Film Awards 2020

Cachoo

Well-Known Member
Messages
8,653
I liked the one hour show compared to many long drawn out award shows.
I think that was part of the reason I liked the Grammy Awards this year; the thrift. (And I thought Haim knocked it out of the park.)
 

Spikefan

Well-Known Member
Messages
1,290
I really want Chadwick Bozeman to win the Best Actor Oscar. I don't care what BAFTA thinks. I find them biased, and not just this year.

I really don't want McDormand to win the third Oscar, or she will be in the same bracket as Streep and Nicholson who have played a lot more great roles - BOW (I know I will get slammed for this statement)

I am about to see A promising young woman, so I will have seen at least one actress and one BP nomination.

I don't care which movie wins the Best Picture, partly because I haven't seen any of them, and partly because this award has been wacky ever since they expanded the field.
I see no problem with McDormand being in the same category as Streep and Nicholson. I to this day think she should already be there for Almost Famous. She, not Kate Hudson is the glue of that movie (I know Kate didn’t win either but I think she sucked all the air). Yes, she doesn’t have the BOW but it really should not be about that. Who was the best in a given year and who is the “glue” of the movie.
 

Vash01

Fan of Yuzuru, Three A's, T&M, P&C
Messages
51,270
I see no problem with McDormand being in the same category as Streep and Nicholson. I to this day think she should already be there for Almost Famous. She, not Kate Hudson is the glue of that movie (I know Kate didn’t win either but I think she sucked all the air). Yes, she doesn’t have the BOW but it really should not be about that. Who was the best in a given year and who is the “glue” of the movie.
I am for the BOW. Had the Is ars been fair, Streep would have 4-5 by now. It us a shame that fir 25 years she did not win an Oscar. McDormand is very good but IMO she is not in the same league. She may still win her third, without waiting for 2-3 decades.
 

VGThuy

Well-Known Member
Messages
35,230
IMO, McDormand has produced more interesting work than the safe baity films Streep churned out in the past two decades, mostly being filler nominations that could have went to more daring work by other actresses.

Anyway, that doesn't matter. It should be about performance, not some idea that only certain actors of a certain stature deserve three Oscars. Besides, McDormand is a triple crown winner (Tony, Emmy, and Oscar winner). She has tons of critics awards and been recognized for stellar work for three decades now. She's worthy.

Also, it's not like Meryl waited forever to win. She won two Oscars within like four years of one another. She won her third 28 years after but got a slew of nominations and had a career where she gets first dibs on roles for actresses her age. McDormand was first nominated in 1989 and won her Oscar 8 years later in 1997. She won her second 21 years after her first one. It's not as if she didn't have to wait either.
 
Last edited:

Vash01

Fan of Yuzuru, Three A's, T&M, P&C
Messages
51,270
IMO, McDormand has produced more interesting work than the safe baity films Streep churned out in the past two decades, mostly being filler nominations that could have went to more daring work by other actresses.

Anyway, that doesn't matter. It should be about performance, not some idea that only certain actors of a certain stature deserve three Oscars. Besides, McDormand is a triple crown winner (Tony, Emmy, and Oscar winner). She has tons of critics awards and been recognized for stellar work for three decades now. She's worthy.

Also, it's not like Meryl waited forever to win. Many careers are shorter than that. She won two Oscars within like four years of one another. She won her third 28 years after but got a slew of nominations and had a career where she gets first dibs on roles for actresses her age. McDormand was first nominated in 1989 and won her Oscar 8 years later in 1997. She won her second 21 years after her first one. It's not as if she didn't have to wait either.
Streep did wait 28 years to win her third Oscar. She was not allowed to win her third, for whatever reason. As if she Should not win a third Oscar. She was put on ice after her second Oscar. No matter how great her performance, she was denied everytime. The nominations were just consolation prizes.

McDormand really had just two really good performances and both won her the Oscars. I assume she is very good in Nomadland (I have not seen the movie), That makes it three. I thought she was just good, not great, in that movie about a small Town (can't remember the name right now). I didn't care for that movie either.
 

PeterG

Well-Known Member
Messages
12,811
I am for the BOW. Had the Is ars been fair, Streep would have 4-5 by now. It us a shame that fir 25 years she did not win an Oscar. McDormand is very good but IMO she is not in the same league. She may still win her third, without waiting for 2-3 decades.

What does BOW mean?

I don't know what "Is ars" means either.
 

Jay42

Between the click of the light
Messages
3,418
I would argue the last time Meryl Streep actually deserved to win an Oscar was for The Devil Wears Prada. She hasn't done anything where her performance couldn't have been done just as well by someone else since then except maybe Julie and Julia. I know Meryl Streep slander is not looked well upon but for someone of her capability phoning in performances for over a decade now and getting awards nominations while neither Amy Adams (arguably Streep's nomination for Florence Foster Jenkins should have gone to Adams) or Glenn Close can seem to win, (I love Olivia Colman immensely but seriously, what does Glenn Close have to do?) it's a little ridiculous.
 

VGThuy

Well-Known Member
Messages
35,230
Streep did wait 28 years to win her third Oscar. She was not allowed to win her third, for whatever reason. As if she Should not win a third Oscar. She was put on ice after her second Oscar. No matter how great her performance, she was denied everytime. The nominations were just consolation prizes.

McDormand really had just two really good performances and both won her the Oscars. I assume she is very good in Nomadland (I have not seen the movie), That makes it three. I thought she was just good, not great, in that movie about a small Town (can't remember the name right now). I didn't care for that movie either.
I know Meryl waited 28 years to win her third. I did the math for you in the post you quoted. And, again, Meryl only waited four years to win her second and two years to win her first after her first nomination while Frances McDormand waited eight years to win her first after her first nomination and 21 years to win her second. So in terms of years, they’re about equal so with regard to timing, Frances didn’t have it much easier. But it doesn’t really matter. BOW doesn’t matter. We’re not choosing the Olympic team or giving a lifetime achievement award You think the Academy looked at Renee Zellweger’s BOW when they gave her a second one? Or Jodi Foster winning her second Best Actress three years after her first before she was 30? Or Christoph Waltz when he won his second only a few years after his first and for another Tarantino film? Diane Wiest winning her second for another Woody Allen film a few years after her first? They never cared about that.

Glenn Close has been waiting thirty-eight years since her first nomination to win her first. It doesn’t matter.

Also, I’m sorry but I have a hard time feeling sorry for Streep and I don’t believe she was “frozen” out from winning her third Oscar. She’s not entitled to any just because of who she is. Every year she lost, she lost due to the Academy simply voting for another person to win. Whether it’s based on that performance, narrative, or any combination of whatever. That’s how it works. I can’t feel sorry for her because ‘s one of the most fortunate actresses out there as she almost always gets nominated while many other actresses who also do great work don’t have her luxury of getting nominated for almost anything she does on screen.

Anyway, both Jack Nicholson and Daniel Day Lewis didn’t have to wait long at all to win their third Oscar. How come no gripes about them? Why focus on McDormand? If you feel the Academy disrespected Meryl for making her wait too long for a third Oscar (and taking someone else’s Oscar away) then McDormand winning or not has NOTHING to do with that and there have already been actors who won their third in shorter amount than McDormand. So it already happened no matter if she wins her third or not two Sundays from now.

Anyway, even if McDormand loses Best Actress, if Nomadland wins Best Picture, then she, as producer, will get a third Oscar for it. So you may be facing seeing her getting her third or even fourth Oscar in two Sundays.
 
Last edited:

VALuvsMKwan

Wandering Goy
Messages
7,636
I know Meryl waited 28 years to win her third. I did the math for you in the post you quoted. And, again, Meryl only waited four years to win her second and two years to win her first after her first nomination while Frances McDormand waited eight years to win her first after her first nomination and 21 years to win her second. So in terms of years, they’re about equal so with regard to timing, Frances didn’t have it much easier. But it doesn’t really matter. BOW doesn’t matter. We’re not choosing the Olympic team or giving a lifetime achievement award You think the Academy looked at Renee Zellweger’s BOW when they gave her a second one? Or Jodi Foster winning her second Best Actress three years after her first before she was 30? Or Christoph Waltz when he won his second only a few years after his first and for another Tarantino film? Diane Wiest winning her second for another Woody Allen film a few years after her first? They never cared about that.

Glenn Close has been waiting thirty-eight years since her first nomination to win her first. It doesn’t matter.

Also, I’m sorry but I have a hard time feeling sorry for Streep and I don’t believe she was “frozen” out from winning her third Oscar. She’s not entitled to any just because of who she is. Every year she lost, she lost due to the Academy simply voting for another person to win. Whether it’s based on that performance, narrative, or any combination of whatever. That’s how it works. I can’t feel sorry for her because ‘s one of the most fortunate actresses out there as she almost always gets nominated while many other actresses who also do great work don’t have her luxury of getting nominated for almost anything she does on screen.

Anyway, both Jack Nicholson and Daniel Day Lewis didn’t have to wait long at all to win their third Oscar. How come no gripes about them? Why focus on McDormand? If you feel the Academy disrespected Meryl for making her wait too long for a third Oscar (and taking someone else’s Oscar away) then McDormand winning or not has NOTHING to do with that and there have already been actors who won their third in shorter amount than McDormand. So it already happened no matter if she wins her third or not two Sundays from now.

Anyway, even if McDormand loses Best Actress, if Nomadland wins Best Picture, then she, as producer, will get a third Oscar for it. So you may be facing seeing her getting her third or even fourth Oscar in two Sundays.
Walter Brennan won his 3 Best Supporting Actor Oscars over a 5-year period from 1936 through 1940 (in fact, I believe that 1936 was the first year for which Supporting Actor Oscars were given).

Don't get me started on AMPAS and Glenn Close vs. Meryl Streep.
 

VGThuy

Well-Known Member
Messages
35,230
First clip of Maia Shibutani skating since her surgery over a year ago and it’s to the music of Minari:

 

VGThuy

Well-Known Member
Messages
35,230
The Independent Spirit Awards announced their winners last night:

Best Feature
“Nomadland”

“First Cow”
“Ma Rainey’s Black Bottom”
“Minari”
“Never Rarely Sometimes Always”

Best Female Lead
Carey Mulligan (“Promising Young Woman”)

Nicole Beharie (“Miss Juneteenth”)
Viola Davis (“Ma Rainey’s Black Bottom”)
Sidney Flanigan (“Never Rarely Sometimes Always”)
Julia Garner (“The Assistant”)
Frances McDormand (“Nomadland”)

Someone to Watch Award
Ekwa Msangi “( Farewell Amor”)

David Midell (“The Killing of Kenneth Chamberlain”)
Annie Silverstein (“Bull”)

Best Male Lead
Riz Ahmed (“The Sound of Metal”)

Chadwick Boseman (“Ma Rainey’s Black Bottom”)
Rob Morgan (“Bull”)
Steven Yeun (“Minari”)
Adarsh Gourav (“The White Tiger”)

Piaget Producers Award
Gerry Kim

Kara Durrett
Lucas Joaquin

Best Director
Chloé Zhao (“Nomadland”)

Lee Isaac Chung (“Minari”)
Emerald Fennell (“Promising Young Woman”)
Eliza Hittman (“Never Rarely Sometimes Always”)
Kelly Reichardt (“First Cow”)

Best New Non-Scripted or Documentary Series
“Immigration Nation”

“Atlanta’s Missing and Murdered: The Lost Children”
“City So Real”
“Love Fraud”
“We’re Here”

John Cassavetes Award
“Residue”

“The Killing of Two Lovers”
“La Leyenda Negra”
“Lingua Franca”
“Saint Frances”

Best Cinematography
Joshua James Richards (“Nomadland”)

Jay Keitel (“She Dies Tomorrow”)
Shabier Kirchner (“Bull”)
Michael Latham (“The Assistant”)
Hélène Louvart (“Never Rarely Sometimes Always”)

Best International Film
“Quo Vadis, Aida?”

“Bacurau”
“The Disciple”
“Night of the Kings”
“Preparations to be Together for an Unknown Period of Time”

Best Editing
“Nomadland”

“I Carry You With Me”
“The Invisible Man”
“Residue”
“Never Rarely Sometimes Always”

Best Ensemble Cast in a New Scripted Series
“I May Destroy You”

Best Male Performance in a New Scripted Series
Amit Rahav (“Unorthodox”)

Conphidance (“Little America”)
Adam Ali (“Little America”)
Nicco Annan (“P-Valley”)
Harold Torre (“Zero, Zero, Zero”)

Best Female Performance in a New Scripted Series
Shira Haas (“Unorthodox”)

Elle Fanning (“The Great”)
Abby McEnany (“Work in Progress”)
Maitreyi Ramakrishnan (“Never Have I Ever”)
Jordan Kristine Seamón (“We Are Who We Are”)

Best New Scripted Series
“I May Destroy You”

“Little America”
“Small Axe”
“A Teacher”
“Unorthodox”

Robert Altman Award
“One Night in Miami”

Best Screenplay
“Promising Young Woman”

“Bad Education”
“Minari”
“The Half of It”
“Never Rarely Sometimes Always”

Best Documentary
“Crip Camp”

“Collective”
“Dick Johnson Is Dead”
“Time”
“The Mole Agent”

Best Supporting Male
Paul Raci (“Sound of Metal”)

Colman Domingo (“Ma Rainey’s Black Bottom”)
Orion Lee (“First Cow”)
Glynn Turman (“Ma Rainey’s Black Bottom”)
Benedict Wong (“Nine Days”)

Truer Than Fiction Award
Elegance Bratton (“Pier Kids”)

Cecilia Aldarondo (“Landfall”)

Best First Feature
“The Sound of Metal”

“I Carry You With Me”
“The 40-Year-Old Version”
“Miss Juneteenth”
“Nine Days”

Best First Screenplay
Andy Siara (“Palm Springs”)

Kitty Green (“The Assistant”)
Noah Hutton (“Lapsis”)
Channing Godfrey Peoples (“Miss Juneteenth”)
James Sweeney (“Straight Up”)

Best Supporting Female
Yuh-jung Youn (“Minari”)

Alexis Chikaeze (“Miss Juneteenth”)
Yeri Han (“Minari”)
Valerie Mahaffey (“French Exit”)
Talia Ryder (“Never Rarely Sometimes Always”)

-------------------------------

Boseman loses his second award in a row. First to Hopkins at BAFTA and now to Riz Ahmed here. I have a feeling he may not win the Oscar despite his heavy favorite status come Sunday. I'm getting a Glenn Close vibe from it, and I think Anthony Hopkins will take it for The Father. Plus, that film is right up Oscar's alley.

Mulligan's win over McDormand here is pretty indicative of her position. This is how I see the Best Actress race:

1. Mulligan - [Broadcast] Film Critics and Spirit Award winner. Some say she could have won BAFTA if the jury didn't snub her for a nomination. I have a feeling this where they'll reward Promising Young Woman. I know people think it'll win Best Screenplay because it won WGA and every other award for it, but I found the screenplay to be the weakest part of that movie and actors LOVE Sorkin and I can see the largest voting branch surprising us by giving it to The Trial of the Chicago 7. So Mulligan, arguably the best part of PYW, will be where they want to reward the movie. I just have a feeling she's in the strongest position to take it in a small plurality where the voters are so split.

2. Davis - SAG winner. Actors are the biggest branch of the Academy but SAG has thousands more members and aren't exclusive the way the Academy is. Usually, when there's a split between BAFTA and SAG, it's about 50/50 on who wins.) Davis has been campaigning very well this season making herself very likable and approachable and has been advocating for all kinds of social justice campaigns for Asian-Americans, spearheading talks with women in film of all ages/roles/races/countries of origins/etc., and the truth is that it's so ridiculous that we haven't had a black actress win Best Actress since Halle Berry in 2001 (2002 ceremony). That said Ma Rainey doesn't seem to be appreciated at all by most of the online film community (they don't get that August Wilson's plays and dialogue is Shakespearean in grandeur, so it's not supposed to be grounded. They also don't seem to respect his works or him as THE African-American playwright), which also hurts Boseman. Also, her character is borderline supporting though I'd argue you can argue either way.

3. McDormand - BAFTA winner. Probably has the most critics awards before the Globes started. Her issue is that people don't usually award a third Oscar so soon after a second and NOT for a low-key subtle grounded performance. However, she's in the Best Pic and Best Director favorite and she carried the film on her two shoulders.

4. Andra Day - Golden Globe - Drama winner. Usually, the drama winner goes on to win multiple awards, but Day, a first-time actress in a movie with bad to middling reviews who says she won't act again, has some things going against her. However, she's in a very tragic/dramatic biopic and has the meatiest most scene chewing performance (thanks to the overwrought direction) and add that to her singing Billie Holiday's songs herself, it's hard to count her out since all of that is Oscar cat nip.

5. Kirby. Venice Film Festival - Volpi Cup for Best Actress winner. Hasn't won any major televised awards but she's the only one other than McDormand (if you don't count the two indie awards) who has been nominated for EVERYTHING. Like Mulligan, she's been making a name for herself among her British peers (and they vote as a bloc sometimes) and she recently had success in The Crown playing Princess Margaret and is known for her theatre work in respected productions. She has a few projects lined up and some may set her up with this award. That said, she hasn't actually won anything since the Venice Film Festival. That said, winning Venice is a big deal as multiple Venice Volpi Cup winners for Best Actress have successfully gone on to win the Oscar this decade.

As for Best Director, I think Chloe Zhao has this in the bag.

Best Picture, Nomadland is still the favorite, but I see a potential upset from The Father since this movie is peaking right during voting time. People seem to be going nuts over it and the subject matter is certainly Oscar bait. Plus, it has a prestigious cast, it's British, has the usual western-style dramaturgical storytelling format while being somewhat new as
the film is told in Hopkins' characters' POV so we don't what we're seeing is accurate or not since he's suffering from dementia
. However, out of all the films nominated, I think Nomadland will be the one we'll most likely be talking about, if at all, because of automation taking over our industries and so many of us will be finding ourselves in the gig economy and needing to be more mobile.

Best Supporting Actor will most likely go to Daniel Kaluuya thought I personally would vote for Paul Raci. This is one of the few times I don't mind category fraud in the case of Lakeith Stanfield because he himself didn't campaign to be put in supporting. The thousands of members in the Actor's branch somehow made that happen.

Best Supporting Actress, this looks like it'll be Youn Yuh-Jung's to lose. Before, this was as open as Best Actress. Non-nominated Jodie Foster won the Globe, Maria Bakalova failed to win her Golden Globe lead Actress in a comedy category but went on to win the critic's choice, and early and small frontrunner Amanda Seyfried failed to get nominated at SAG. Then there was Glenn Close, who although receiving a Razzie nomination for this performance in a film people are hating, always has some support from her fellow actors and the fact that she's on 8 nominations and 0 wins will always make her some sort of threat. But with a SAG, BAFTA, and now Spirits win, I think Youn has it now. Some think Olivia Colman may be spoiler and although she was snubbed at BAFTA (of all places), London critics, Golden Globes, etc. The Father has been hitting its peak. I think the biggest thing about Youn is that Oscar almost NEVER awards Asian actors and don't even nominate them in Best Picture contenders/winners. The tide may be changing here with two East Asian actors nominated in a Best Pic contender and Riz Ahmed being a South Asian nominee.
 

Vash01

Fan of Yuzuru, Three A's, T&M, P&C
Messages
51,270
Nice to see Never rarely... get so many nominations. ThebOscars completely ignored this movie.
 

VGThuy

Well-Known Member
Messages
35,230
Nice to see Never rarely... get so many nominations. ThebOscars completely ignored this movie.
Not only was it ignored, one Academy member actually wrote a letter to the director, misspelled her name, and said he refused to watch it because it promoted abortion. He also made some insinuation about how half the country supported Trump without mentioning him by name but you knew what he was getting at. One of the grossest things that happened this season.
 

Japanfan

Well-Known Member
Messages
24,679
Not only was it ignored, one Academy member actually wrote a letter to the director, misspelled her name, and said he refused to watch it because it promoted abortion. He also made some insinuation about how half the country supported Trump without mentioning him by name but you knew what he was getting at. One of the grossest things that happened this season.

I don't think the film 'promoted' abortion. If it promotes anything, it is a woman's right to choose. It was a 17 year old girl making the choice to get an abortion, knowing she was not ready or able to be a mother.

Not surprising that pro-lifers didn't like the film. I read one review criticizing it because no other choice was considered other than abortion. Well - the character had made her choice, as was her right.

Hollywood rarely touches upon abortion. Robin Wright's character in 'House of Cards' admitted to having 3 and there was a small movie made a long time ago called 'If these Walls Could Talk', with Cher and Sissi Spacek (sp?) that told the story of three women who had abortions at different points in time.

Abortions happen - I heard that one in four women have abortions in their lifetime (in a pro-choice bit from the Handmaid's Tale cast), but don't have a stat to back that up.

Abortion has been legal in most of the developed world for almost 50 years now, and most of the world has moved on. It's easier for women in Catholic countries to get abortions (e.g. Ukrainian women get the procedure done on Swedish ships in international waters, or in Croatia) than it is for women in the Dakotas to get abortions (only one clinic in both states, last I heard).

Not to mention, it was an excellent film. I thought both actresses gave first-rate performances. And the film brilliantly depicted all the women went through to get an abortion. Not just the procedure itself, but having to get the money for it on the sly, having to pay to travel for it. Being stuck overnight in a large, strange city, with no money and nowhere to stay or sleep - and scared.
 
Last edited:

Users who are viewing this thread

Top
Do Not Sell My Personal Information