#Canada150 (Canadian politics and related issues)

skatingguy

Well-Known Member
Messages
11,989
Now if he would just sell a few of the thousands of artifacts in the Vatican and turn the money over to the First Nations to make some reparations....
That would be much better than what's happening now with individual diocese having to sell off property, and some parishes losing their community church, in order to pay for the damages that really should be the responsibility of the whole church.

 

skategal

Bunny mama
Messages
10,020
That would be much better than what's happening now with individual diocese having to sell off property, and some parishes losing their community church, in order to pay for the damages that really should be the responsibility of the whole church.

My husband’s former parish is one of them.

However, in the older part of St. John’s, there is a Catholic Church on almost every corner.

My husband grew up in walking distance of 3 but went to the closest one.

That was never going to be sustainable long term with a dwindling church going population.

After the sex scandal, the Catholic church lost a ton of members in Newfoundland.

So while it is dumb not to just pay out the settlement straight from the Vatican, those properties were going to have to be sold eventually anyway because they cost too much to run without parishioners.
 

overedge

Mayor of Carrot City
Messages
33,356

skategal

Bunny mama
Messages
10,020
Both can happen at the same time. Especially since the Canadian church seems reluctant to compensate the First Nations. https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/saskatoon/cccb-fundraiser-november-timeline-missed-1.6294008
The richest organization in the world saying that they don’t have the funds to pay settlements is ridiculous. :shuffle:

If the diocese doesn’t have it, money can come from the Vatican.

They don’t need to sell anything to raise the funds.

They are just putting up road blocks.
 

Andora

Skating season ends as baseball season begins
Messages
11,680
The richest organization in the world saying that they don’t have the funds to pay settlements is ridiculous. :shuffle:

If the diocese doesn’t have it, money can come from the Vatican.

They don’t need to sell anything to raise the funds.

They are just putting up road blocks.

Well, the "richest organization in the world" also is fine not paying taxes anywhere.

It's sad that Pope Francis can be considered a great pope by virtue of apologizing for a horrific wrong, and not wearing Prada shoes like Joey the Rat did.

I never thought the church would apologize in any form. Indigenous friends of mine will note the apology was still lacking, which I agree with. And yet still, it's amazing it happened.
 

PRlady

Well-Known Member
Messages
40,535
Alert: this is from opinionated American who loves politics and spent a month in your country. Can't keep my thoughts to myself...

1. I was surprised at how many people were down or meh on Trudeau. Of course, Tony Blair looked like God to us Yankees when we had W so it's quite possible that Justin ain't all that from the inside, but nonetheless both DH (a veteran of Israeli political wars) and I were surprised.
2. Canada does so much better honoring First Nations and their history than we do, especially in the national park sites. I know there's still huge issues with reparations and honoring treaties but you are way, way ahead of us in terms of public recognition.
3. Newfies really, really want Americans to understand that they are Newfies first and Canadians second. We only heard about the cod moratorium every single place we went. The guys manning the boat at Western Pond took pains to explain to us (apparently the only Americans on the boat although of course DH got "where are you REALLY from?") that their high schools were graduating half or less the number of students as when they went 20/30 years ago, and they made fun of the couples who volunteered that they were from Alberta by making jokes about all the Newfies there trying to make a living. Fascinating to we outsiders.
4. Canadian Nice is not a myth. We decided that even if we were not too old to qualify for citizenship based on the points system, we would be politely discouraged for our outspoken personalities.
5. I can't tell you how depressing it was us to be asked by SO MANY nice Canadians WTF was wrong with us "down there." :( Of course, we were prepared to offer hours of analysis if anyone wanted it, I was surprised that a few people did. We ended up eating with strangers in Halifax, Trinity and Cavandish which was so nice, even if the dinners turned into comparative political systems discussions.
6. It was DH who noticed, driving small-town Nova Scotia, how many fewer churches there were than around here. I had to look up the United Church of Canada to find out what it was, I was surprised it's bigger than the Anglicans. But in the Maritimes and Newfoundland, that Catholic Church sure does loom large. :scream:
7. If the places we visited on this trip would like to provide us with a free return trip every summer I will be happy to be their Canada Tourism outpost. What a spectacular set of places, and people down here don't realize how relatively accessible it is.

I would also point that we were less snobbish about some aspects of Maritime living than the Tronans we eavesdropped on. ;)
 

Judy

Well-Known Member
Messages
4,415
Alert: this is from opinionated American who loves politics and spent a month in your country. Can't keep my thoughts to myself...

1. I was surprised at how many people were down or meh on Trudeau. Of course, Tony Blair looked like God to us Yankees when we had W so it's quite possible that Justin ain't all that from the inside, but nonetheless both DH (a veteran of Israeli political wars) and I were surprised.
2. Canada does so much better honoring First Nations and their history than we do, especially in the national park sites. I know there's still huge issues with reparations and honoring treaties but you are way, way ahead of us in terms of public recognition.
3. Newfies really, really want Americans to understand that they are Newfies first and Canadians second. We only heard about the cod moratorium every single place we went. The guys manning the boat at Western Pond took pains to explain to us (apparently the only Americans on the boat although of course DH got "where are you REALLY from?") that their high schools were graduating half or less the number of students as when they went 20/30 years ago, and they made fun of the couples who volunteered that they were from Alberta by making jokes about all the Newfies there trying to make a living. Fascinating to we outsiders.
4. Canadian Nice is not a myth. We decided that even if we were not too old to qualify for citizenship based on the points system, we would be politely discouraged for our outspoken personalities.
5. I can't tell you how depressing it was us to be asked by SO MANY nice Canadians WTF was wrong with us "down there." :( Of course, we were prepared to offer hours of analysis if anyone wanted it, I was surprised that a few people did. We ended up eating with strangers in Halifax, Trinity and Cavandish which was so nice, even if the dinners turned into comparative political systems discussions.
6. It was DH who noticed, driving small-town Nova Scotia, how many fewer churches there were than around here. I had to look up the United Church of Canada to find out what it was, I was surprised it's bigger than the Anglicans. But in the Maritimes and Newfoundland, that Catholic Church sure does loom large. :scream:
7. If the places we visited on this trip would like to provide us with a free return trip every summer I will be happy to be their Canada Tourism outpost. What a spectacular set of places, and people down here don't realize how relatively accessible it is.

I would also point that we were less snobbish about some aspects of Maritime living than the Tronans we eavesdropped on. ;)
I think Newfies do believe they are Newfies first lol. Sounds like you had a great trip.
 

manhn

Well-Known Member
Messages
14,304
I think Quebecers think of themselves as Quebecers first. I also think this is true of Albertans.

I don't know. When I visit somewhere outside of Canada, I refer to myself as Canadian or say I am from Canada. When Newfoundlanders visit some country like Japan or Brazil, do they tell people they are from Newfoundland instead of Canada? I am relieved when non-Canadians even know of Canada, let alone some random province or territory.
 

quartz

scratching at the light
Messages
17,575
Other Ontario-ans have no clue where our town is until we say “south of London”. Then they sorta know. When we were in Newfoundland, so many people knew our town, as so many of them have lived in SW Ontario for periods of time or have family who have. A lot of them have come to attend the universities here, Western, Guelph, McMaster, etc.
 

Desperado

Well-Known Member
Messages
1,226
@PRlady - I think you visited the areas with the most renowned nice Canadians. I lived around many opiniated (read rude) people in Montreal and I'm sure there are many in Toronto and elsewhere as well. :D Ottawa used to have very friendly and chatty people, but it's changed over the years and especially since the pandemic, people are way more "in your face" or just plain try to run over you. Getting bigger as a city will do that.

We may however, always try harder with tourists. ;)
 

PRlady

Well-Known Member
Messages
40,535
@PRlady - I think you visited the areas with the most renowned nice Canadians. I lived around many opiniated (read rude) people in Montreal and I'm sure there are many in Toronto and elsewhere as well. :D Ottawa used to have very friendly and chatty people, but it's changed over the years and especially since the pandemic, people are way more "in your face" or just plain try to run over you. Getting bigger as a city will do that.

We may however, always try harder with tourists. ;)
That’s not nothing. Neither Washingtonians nor Israelis try harder with tourists. In DC we grumble at you to get out of the way when you can’t figure out the Metro.
 

UMBS Go Blue

Слава Україні!
Messages
15,575
For what it's worth, I've spent some time in Toronto recently, and I was surprised at a few things:
  • Lots of cars with "F--- Trudeau" stickers
  • Shockingly aggressive driving from some people, on a level with Miami/NYC/California
  • Yet slower drivers do not yield the left lanes - hence highway backups everywhere almost 24/7
  • A breathtakingly booming skyline, especially along the waterfront - it's like a canyon of condos surrounding the Gardiner Expressway
  • But despite such evidence of population growth, the amount of highways in the region appear mostly the same as it was 20-30 years ago
  • How smug some millennials were about being Canadian and being better than Americans, to the point of openly saying "F--- America"
Also, perhaps not politically related, but Lisa LaFlamme's contract with CTV was not renewed. The first thing that comes to mind is that she's only 58, while Lloyd Robertson and Peter Mansbridge carried on well beyond that.


 
Last edited:

Judy

Well-Known Member
Messages
4,415
For what it's worth, I've spent some time in Toronto recently, and I was surprised at a few things:
  • Lots of cars with "F--- Trudeau" stickers
  • Shockingly aggressive driving from some people, on a level with Miami/NYC/California
  • Yet slower drivers do not yield the left lanes - hence highway backups everywhere almost 24/7
  • A breathtakingly booming skyline, especially along the waterfront - it's like a canyon of condos surrounding the Gardiner Expressway
  • But despite such evidence of population growth, the amount of highways in the region appear mostly the same as it was 20-30 years ago
  • How smug some millennials were about being Canadian and being better than Americans, to the point of openly saying "F--- America"
Also, perhaps not politically related, but Lisa LaFlamme's contract with CTV was not renewed. The first thing that comes to mind is that she's only 58, while Lloyd Robertson and Peter Mansbridge carried on well beyond that.


I haven’t been to Toronto in a long time. It’s too big a city for me personally.

Very disappointing about Lisa LaFlamme. Lloyd Robertson was 77 years old when he retired. She’s always been an excellent journalist.
 

Jay42

Between the click of the light
Messages
4,038
3. Newfies really, really want Americans to understand that they are Newfies first and Canadians second. We only heard about the cod moratorium every single place we went. The guys manning the boat at Western Pond took pains to explain to us (apparently the only Americans on the boat although of course DH got "where are you REALLY from?") that their high schools were graduating half or less the number of students as when they went 20/30 years ago, and they made fun of the couples who volunteered that they were from Alberta by making jokes about all the Newfies there trying to make a living. Fascinating to we outsiders.
Oh yeah that totally tracks. When I worked at the first McDonald's I worked at from 2005-2009 when most of the Newfies moved here to work in the oil patch people would joke about Alberta becoming a second Newfoundland a lot. The Newfies I knew were into it because of course Newfoundland was better anyway so why wouldn't we want to be Newfoundland?
 

pat c

Well-Known Member
Messages
13,071
Also, perhaps not politically related, but Lisa LaFlamme's contract with CTV was not renewed. The first thing that comes to mind is that she's only 58, while Lloyd Robertson and Peter Mansbridge carried on well beyond that.



I was unhappy to read that. She did an excellent job of the 2010 olys. Omar isn't in the same league at all. The first thing that came to my mind, was who did she po.
 

Desperado

Well-Known Member
Messages
1,226
I was unhappy to read that. She did an excellent job of the 2010 olys. Omar isn't in the same league at all. The first thing that came to my mind, was who did she po.
Ding! Ding! Ding!

Canadaland has apparently the inside story on LaFlamme's firing, but their site keeps blowing up from the hits so it may take a few clicks to read it. Here's the focus:

"Lisa LaFlamme, chief anchor of CTV National News, was unceremoniously and clumsily fired because she pushed back against one Bell Media executive, say several sources with firsthand knowledge of the situation.

Michael Melling, vice president of news at Bell Media, is responsible for ousting LaFlamme, multiple sources tell Canadaland."

https://www.canadaland.com/bell-exe...rfered-with-ctv-news-coverage-says-colleague/

From my Twitter feed, 100% sure tons of women who used to work at CTV news will be great sources of info for more.
 

skategal

Bunny mama
Messages
10,020
Alert: this is from opinionated American who loves politics and spent a month in your country. Can't keep my thoughts to myself...

1. I was surprised at how many people were down or meh on Trudeau. Of course, Tony Blair looked like God to us Yankees when we had W so it's quite possible that Justin ain't all that from the inside, but nonetheless both DH (a veteran of Israeli political wars) and I were surprised.
2. Canada does so much better honoring First Nations and their history than we do, especially in the national park sites. I know there's still huge issues with reparations and honoring treaties but you are way, way ahead of us in terms of public recognition.
3. Newfies really, really want Americans to understand that they are Newfies first and Canadians second. We only heard about the cod moratorium every single place we went. The guys manning the boat at Western Pond took pains to explain to us (apparently the only Americans on the boat although of course DH got "where are you REALLY from?") that their high schools were graduating half or less the number of students as when they went 20/30 years ago, and they made fun of the couples who volunteered that they were from Alberta by making jokes about all the Newfies there trying to make a living. Fascinating to we outsiders.
4. Canadian Nice is not a myth. We decided that even if we were not too old to qualify for citizenship based on the points system, we would be politely discouraged for our outspoken personalities.
5. I can't tell you how depressing it was us to be asked by SO MANY nice Canadians WTF was wrong with us "down there." :( Of course, we were prepared to offer hours of analysis if anyone wanted it, I was surprised that a few people did. We ended up eating with strangers in Halifax, Trinity and Cavandish which was so nice, even if the dinners turned into comparative political systems discussions.
6. It was DH who noticed, driving small-town Nova Scotia, how many fewer churches there were than around here. I had to look up the United Church of Canada to find out what it was, I was surprised it's bigger than the Anglicans. But in the Maritimes and Newfoundland, that Catholic Church sure does loom large. :scream:
7. If the places we visited on this trip would like to provide us with a free return trip every summer I will be happy to be their Canada Tourism outpost. What a spectacular set of places, and people down here don't realize how relatively accessible it is.

I would also point that we were less snobbish about some aspects of Maritime living than the Tronans we eavesdropped on. ;)
Point 1: Governments in Canada don't tend to last more than 10 years. He is getting near his "best before" date. Also, you are seeing the urban/rural divide at play. JT (liberals/ndp) has much more support in urban areas.

Point 3: Popular among the older set, especially those before 1949 when Newfoundland was a country. My DH's uncle used to have lots of fun with Border Security by telling them he was a Newfoundlander, not Canadian because he was born before 1949 and didn't vote to join Canada. DH was mortified every time. LOL.

Population decline is REAL in Canada and nowhere worse than Newfoundland. This is why there is 20-30% less graduates. There are 20-30% less people born in Newfoundland. I honestly don't know how they are going to manage this in the future. Its sad.

Point 6: Surprised about less churches considering you were in PEI (church on every corner...:lol:)

Glad you had such a wonderful trip. I enjoyed meeting you and your DH.

@manhn, Newfoundlanders as a rule do not say they are from Newfoundland when asked where they are from on vacation. They know that no one knows where Newfoundland is but everyone knows where Canada is. They only specify when asked and then wait for the stupid questions to start (Is there electricity there? Do you live in an igloo? :lol:)

However, people born in Newfoundland will say that they are from Newfoundland to other Canadians even if they haven't lived there for decades. (ie. I'm from Newfoundland but I live in XYZ. :lol:)
 

Judy

Well-Known Member
Messages
4,415
For what it's worth, I've spent some time in Toronto recently, and I was surprised at a few things:
  • Lots of cars with "F--- Trudeau" stickers
  • Shockingly aggressive driving from some people, on a level with Miami/NYC/California
  • Yet slower drivers do not yield the left lanes - hence highway backups everywhere almost 24/7
  • A breathtakingly booming skyline, especially along the waterfront - it's like a canyon of condos surrounding the Gardiner Expressway
  • But despite such evidence of population growth, the amount of highways in the region appear mostly the same as it was 20-30 years ago
  • How smug some millennials were about being Canadian and being better than Americans, to the point of openly saying "F--- America"
Also, perhaps not politically related, but Lisa LaFlamme's contract with CTV was not renewed. The first thing that comes to mind is that she's only 58, while Lloyd Robertson and Peter Mansbridge carried on well beyond that.


The f*** Trudeau stickers may be the freaky freedom peeps who continue to protest about .. well everything.
 

PRlady

Well-Known Member
Messages
40,535
Point 1: Governments in Canada don't tend to last more than 10 years. He is getting near his "best before" date. Also, you are seeing the urban/rural divide at play. JT (liberals/ndp) has much more support in urban areas.

Point 3: Popular among the older set, especially those before 1949 when Newfoundland was a country. My DH's uncle used to have lots of fun with Border Security by telling them he was a Newfoundlander, not Canadian because he was born before 1949 and didn't vote to join Canada. DH was mortified every time. LOL.

Population decline is REAL in Canada and nowhere worse than Newfoundland. This is why there is 20-30% less graduates. There are 20-30% less people born in Newfoundland. I honestly don't know how they are going to manage this in the future. Its sad.

Point 6: Surprised about less churches considering you were in PEI (church on every corner...:lol:)

Glad you had such a wonderful trip. I enjoyed meeting you and your DH.

@manhn, Newfoundlanders as a rule do not say they are from Newfoundland when asked where they are from on vacation. They know that no one knows where Newfoundland is but everyone knows where Canada is. They only specify when asked and then wait for the stupid questions to start (Is there electricity there? Do you live in an igloo? :lol:)

However, people born in Newfoundland will say that they are from Newfoundland to other Canadians even if they haven't lived there for decades. (ie. I'm from Newfoundland but I live in XYZ. :lol:)
Thanks again for your help! You were the last person we saw that we “knew” for weeks. And the churchless expanse was in Nova Scotia, but nowhere were there as many as here. Which translates into a lot fewer theocrats, I guess.
 

Pink Cats

Well-Known Member
Messages
140
Thanks again for your help! You were the last person we saw that we “knew” for weeks. And the churchless expanse was in Nova Scotia, but nowhere were there as many as here. Which translates into a lot fewer theocrats, I guess.
How many churches are there in DC? I live in Nova Scotia and never thought we lacked churches.
 

Judy

Well-Known Member
Messages
4,415
I was unhappy to read that. She did an excellent job of the 2010 olys. Omar isn't in the same league at all. The first thing that came to my mind, was who did she po.
With Bell Media it is all about money and cutting the biggest salary. Sadly.
 

Andora

Skating season ends as baseball season begins
Messages
11,680
It's so cute when Americans comment on our country as if they've just discovered it. Including those who admitted to spending more time here in their past. :yawn:

For what it's worth, I've spent some time in Toronto recently, and I was surprised at a few things:
  • Lots of cars with "F--- Trudeau" stickers
  • Shockingly aggressive driving from some people, on a level with Miami/NYC/California
  • Yet slower drivers do not yield the left lanes - hence highway backups everywhere almost 24/7
  • A breathtakingly booming skyline, especially along the waterfront - it's like a canyon of condos surrounding the Gardiner Expressway
  • But despite such evidence of population growth, the amount of highways in the region appear mostly the same as it was 20-30 years ago
  • How smug some millennials were about being Canadian and being better than Americans, to the point of openly saying "F--- America"
Also, perhaps not politically related, but Lisa LaFlamme's contract with CTV was not renewed. The first thing that comes to mind is that she's only 58, while Lloyd Robertson and Peter Mansbridge carried on well beyond that.



Lisa LaFlamme's firing is politically related tertiarily. Unless some people don't consider aspects of sexism/ageism political. But I used to work for Bell Media, so... I'll leave it at that.

But the other points you raise:
  • Yup, there's a lot of idiots in this country who are taking out a lot of internal issues they have out on our Prime Minister, who has his issues but is largely inoffensive comparative to his political peers. (including Mr. Singh)
  • Yes, the driving around here has gotten increasingly worse since the pandemic. Like it has everywhere. And it makes me grateful for hybrid work.
  • GOD DO NOT GET ME STARTED WITH SLOW LEFT LANE DRIVERS. #(*&@#$ This isn't new, and my cause of death will probably be related to this. It also seems to be represented by all cultures/ages/genders, but no one admits to it other than my friends in Markham.
  • What, you don't think it's progress? Isn't that progress? (snort) I have to go find an article from years ago indicating a bunch of them were 30% empty, to boot.
  • 100% true, and even better: public transit improvements have been slow and lacking, so Toronto has basically been unlivable for decades.
  • That's not new - Canadians have always been smug when we look at the meth lab to the south of us. But if it's any consolation, it's to our own detriment as we continue to ignore our own path to hell.


Point 1: Governments in Canada don't tend to last more than 10 years. He is getting near his "best before" date. Also, you are seeing the urban/rural divide at play. JT (liberals/ndp) has much more support in urban areas.

No, Trudeau does not have more support in urban areas. (And he needs to step down before his being a target drives the party into the ground) The ring around Toronto is increasingly blue, and it's closing in. Drug-- sorry, Doug Ford and his goddamn family came from Etobicoke. Toronto/Ontario cities are not the bastion of liberal/NDP support people think it is. Just look at the last, horrifyingly embarrassing Ontario election.

Speaking of which, I'm surprised there's not more discussion about OHIP heading private. Doug Ford and his cronies have created a catastrophe-- DURING AND AFTER A GODDAMN PANDEMIC-- and now they're actively saying they have to privatize healthcare in order to save it.

If there's any FSUers here who didn't vote, or voted for the Ontario PC party, please accept this from the bottom of my heart: Go **** yourself.
 

Judy

Well-Known Member
Messages
4,415
Not really political but the QAnon - with Canada’s “Queen“ - was in Peterbourgh this past weekend with a small group of their followers. They were there to make civilian arrests with Peterbourgh police at their station. It really didn’t go well for QAnon.
 
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9,208
I've never been a member of a political party, but is voting for party leadership generally different than any other kind of election? My local MP set up in front of a gun store (because of course he did :rolleyes: ) with an amazon box with a hole hacked in the top with a sign on it saying Pierre Pollievre for Prime Minister, collecting ballots. Seemed weird to me, but maybe that's normal?
 

Judy

Well-Known Member
Messages
4,415
I've never been a member of a political party, but is voting for party leadership generally different than any other kind of election? My local MP set up in front of a gun store (because of course he did :rolleyes: ) with an amazon box with a hole hacked in the top with a sign on it saying Pierre Pollievre for Prime Minister, collecting ballots. Seemed weird to me, but maybe that's normal?
I’be never been part of it either. I found this … https://www.itstartsrightnow.ca/membership_in_political_parties but I’ve never done any research.
 

pat c

Well-Known Member
Messages
13,071
I've never been a member of a political party, but is voting for party leadership generally different than any other kind of election? My local MP set up in front of a gun store (because of course he did :rolleyes: ) with an amazon box with a hole hacked in the top with a sign on it saying Pierre Pollievre for Prime Minister, collecting ballots. Seemed weird to me, but maybe that's normal?

No it's not. You have to buy a membership in that party to vote for the leader.

I've thought about doing that, but if you buy a con or ndp membership you can't have another political membership, not sure about the liberal. And my thought was to be able to have some say in who these party choose as their leader. ;) I know people in AB who buy the con leadership just to have some say as to who is chosen as the leader of the party.
 

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