#Canada150 (Canadian politics and related issues)

Jenny

From the Bloc
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20,880
With everyone's indulgence I'd like to start a new Canadian thread on the eve of the country's 150th birthday, given that the last thread's title has not reflected the ongoing discussion in many months.

Today I read two very interesting articles that I wanted to share:

Canada's Secret to Resisting the West's Populist Wave
- which as you may guess before clicking talks about how Canada's historic and current immigration policies have shaped the country, and essentially concludes that since every political party must court the immigrant vote, none of them are willing to raise issues about limiting immigration etc, which often seems to feed populist movements.

The comments are thoughtful and worth reading - appears to be about equally Americans and Canadians (it's in the NY Times, which is generally pro-Canada), and many bring up the country's ongoing struggle with indigenous issues as a way to say it hasn't been and still isn't all "sunny ways" in Canada.

Then I read this article in the Globe and Mail - Black Nova Scotia: Touring a community that's been here longer than 150 years. As you may expect, it's a mixed report of hope and sadness, but I'm glad it shines the light on another important part of Canadian history.

I'm all for celebrations (including the big duckie!), but I'm also glad that our media is taking this opportunity to examine Canada past and present, and give voice to as many Canadians as possible.
 

manhn

Well-Known Member
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12,534
As a child of immigrants, I have experienced direct benefit from many Canadians and Canadian policies. My sponsorship family. The assisted funding for my parents to get training to work. Assisted funding for my parents to buy a home, even if it ended up being in Surrey. Public school. Public libraries. Skating lessons. CBC. Universal health care. My family have wonderful lives Down South but I feel and believe and know that my life would be very different if I were raised somewhere else. I doubt very very much I would be a figure skating fan, for instance.

Someone else can discuss how the country is lacking.
 

Jenny

From the Bloc
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20,880
I too am a child of immigrants who met after they arrived, so yeah, I grew up with many adult relatives who had nothing but good to say about their adopted home. In my formative years our neighbours and my schoolmates were all multi-generation Canadians, mostly of British descent and a handful of Jewish families, so while we all looked alike, I was definitely different in that my parents and the grandparents we lived with spoke with accents, we had our own holiday traditions, and when kids came to my house the food was different than they were used to. I'm glad I grew up as the different kid, because by the time the next waves of non-European immigrants started arriving, I was already ready to welcome them as my family had been.
 

MacMadame

Cat Lady-in-Training
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29,948
I was raised to think of myself as a descendant of immigrants. The immigration of our ancestors was presented as it happened yesterday. Because I knew my grandparents were born in this country, I assumed their parents weren't. Turns out it was their grandparents who immigrated, which for many people would be so far back that it wouldn't be part of the family culture at all! (This makes me a 4th generation immigrant, if I am counting correctly.) But it was very much a part of our identity.
 

Jenny

From the Bloc
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20,880
Interesting @MacMadame because so many Americans will tell you they are Italian American or African American or Irish American, so you would think the country as a whole would embrace other cultures as well?

Some quotes from the first article linked above:

In France, for instance, it is common to hear that immigration dilutes French identity, and that allowing minority groups to keep their own cultures erodes vital elements of Frenchness.

Identity works differently in Canada. Both whites and nonwhites see Canadian identity as something that not only can accommodate outsiders, but is enhanced by the inclusion of many different kinds of people.
In Britain, among white voters who say they want less immigration, about 40 percent also say that limiting immigration is the most important issue to them. In the United States, that figure is about 20 percent. In Canada, according to a 2011 study, it was only 0.34 percent.
Of course, Canada and the US being much younger countries, there are few of us who don't have immigrants among the relatives we have or can still remember.

Another key point in the article, and indeed that seems to be well acknowledged in similar discussions, is that geography plays a significant role. The only land borders are with the US, and it's a helluva long boat ride in any direction, so Canada doesn't get a regular influx of refugees and illegal immigrants, but rather can control, for the most part, who comes.
 

algonquin

Well-Known Member
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4,952
Trudeau forgot to mention Alberta in his speech yesterday. Unfortunate mistake that his political opponents will use to their advantage.
 

WildRose

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2,754
Its just the media trying to create controversy. Personally I thought it was kind of funny. Of all the provinces for him to miss of course it would be Alberta - LOL - but no big deal, it obviously wasn't deliberate and Albertans know that.
Happy Canada Day weekend to all my fellow Canadians - from sunny Alberta!
 

skategal

Bunny mama
Messages
6,076
Its just the media trying to create controversy. Personally I thought it was kind of funny. Of all the provinces for him to miss of course it would be Alberta - LOL - but no big deal, it obviously wasn't deliberate and Albertans know that.
Happy Canada Day weekend to all my fellow Canadians - from sunny Alberta!
I'm jealous that it's sunny where you are!

We have had a rotten 2 days of weather.

The worst I can remember in 17 years living here. It's usually really hot and sunny on Canada Day.

Tomorrow will be nice at least....
 

algonquin

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We had a torrential downpour yesterday afternoon, but it cleared up in time for our barbecue and stayed clear for the fireworks.
 

WildRose

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We have been really fortunate in Alberta this weekend - the weather has been great. Some thunderstorms rolled through yesterday, but that's to be expected when it's hot. Yesterday was kind of hot & muggy but today is all sunshine and big blue sky :)
 

algonquin

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4,952
On another note, Peter Mansbridge's retirement is an end of an era. What a career that man had considering that he was "discovered" at the Churchill airport. I think that he would be a good choice for the next GG, but I am not sure if he speaks French.
 

algonquin

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4,952
So, I read fair bit yesterday to make sense of the Khadr settlement. In a nutshell, it would cost us taxpayers a lot more than 10 million in legal fees if the federal government had not settled. The government would have lost all court challenges. All this could have been avoided if the Chrétien, Martin, and Harper governments had handled the situation differently. CSIS is complicit as well. Khadr should have been bought home and faced trial here. Other countries did that with their Guantanamo Bay prisoners. A lot of online comments have stated that this case would have been handled differently if Khadr was a white Christian. One has to wonder.

Does anyone know if he went through waterboarding?

Here is a link to the Star's editorial. The Globe's editorial is worth a read, but I can't link it.

https://www.thestar.com/opinion/editorials/2017/07/04/deal-for-khadr-acknowledges-violations-of-rights-editorial.html
 
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skategal

Bunny mama
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6,076
:(I heard yesterday that he went through interrogation after sleep deprivation torture.

Never heard anything about water boarding.

I agree the government mishandled it completely.

He should have been brought back to Canada and tried.

Sort of hard to process though that he gets 10.5 million even though he was complicit (at minimum) in an act of terror. :eek:

Especially when you consider the indigenous kids sent to residential school and their compensation levels. :(
 

Jenny

From the Bloc
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20,880
Yes that is the part that alarms me too - essentially giving $10 million to terrorism. Not sure what the alternative solution is though. It's a long and ugly story that needs to be resolved.
 

algonquin

Well-Known Member
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His lawyers asked for 20 million. I agree with @Jenny, I am not sure what an alternative arrangements could be made.
 

Jenny

From the Bloc
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20,880
I have to say though that I do like that this government is owning up to its mistakes - large and small - and taking responsibility for the mistakes of their predecessors and taking action. Often too slowly unfortunately, but at least it's happening rather than the political tradition of blaming others or sweeping things under the rug and leaving it for the next government to figure out. Or, as in some othercoughcountries, spending all their energy just undoing whatever good the last government did without any actual vision for the future.
 

algonquin

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I agree that there is something to be learned from this. Although, Jason Kenney hasn't learned anything. He called the settlement odious. So what is the federal government supposed to do keep fighting this and loosing?
 

algonquin

Well-Known Member
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4,952
Read this in the Globe comment section. Worth Sharing.

What Khadr did or did not do is irrelevant. Whether he was a terrorist or not is irrelevant. Whether he killed someone is irrelevant.

The Canadian government violated his rights. bad guys have rights too. It is the reason murders & rapists walk when the police break the rules.

If you have a problem with holding the government to task for violating your rights, you might want to live in a dictatorship.
 

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