Black don't crack

PeterG

Well-Known Member
Messages
12,484
As long as women look both young and pretty, they have value to me. So all these three can stay.
 

gk_891

Well-Known Member
Messages
4,155
It can often be true. There's not only that saying (Black Don't Crack) but there's also Asian Don't Raisin.
 

agalisgv

Well-Known Member
Messages
26,992
Isn't it pretty uncommon to be wrinkly in your mid-thirties? If you have kids in your teens, you're not going to be that old by the time they are teens themselves.
 

Spun Silver

Well-Known Member
Messages
11,124
It's not that common for a mother to be taken for her teenage daughter. As much as some mothers might try. :/
 

taf2002

Fluff up your tutu & dance away.....
Messages
22,994
I have never heard this expression before. I can't begin to understand what it has to do with (if I'm understanding this right) not looking your age.
 

Kasey

Fan of many, uber of none
Messages
15,180
I'm assuming it describes how darker skin doesn't wrinkle as fast as lighter skin? I think it's not an uncommon phenomenon, but of course, it depends on the individual and how they take care of themselves. My dad is going to be 80 this year and looks at least 15 years younger. But my mom, who is light-skinned, is now 69 and looks 10 or 12 years younger as well. So I think it's a load of horse pucky, and really not something really significant when looking at 2 16 year olds and a 35 year old mom! :)
 

Erin

Well-Known Member
Messages
9,095
I guessed correctly which one was the mom, but I thought there was a big giveaway that has nothing to do with how old the mom looks in the face.
The mom has a suit jacket on, which would be rare for a teenager to be wearing

I'm the same age as the mom and frequently get mistaken for being about 10 years younger, although I've often that thought the reason for that is that I don't have kids ;) The mom does probably look younger than I do, but I also think the daughters look older than teenagers, which adds to the challenge.
 

MacMadame

Cat Lady-in-Training
Messages
29,362
I guessed correctly too. Because it's supposed to be a picture of 2 twins and a mom and there are two almost identical women and one who looks related to them but not identical. Plus that one looked slightly older.
 

Louis

Well-Known Member
Messages
13,291
I guessed correctly, too, and think there's another big clue:
the mom is in the driver's seat of the car
.

It's true, good Black don't crack. But this is also an instagram (not high-res) photo, where the woman is wearing makeup, which can cover a lot. It's pretty easy to look 10-15 years younger on Instagram.
 

altai_rose

Well-Known Member
Messages
3,195
I have a question. Isn't this a racial stereotype? Are only negative stereotypes about black people unacceptable, but positive ones are lauded? :EVILLE::p

On a more serious note, I've heard that black and Asian people tend to have more oily skin, which is protective against wrinkling.
 

skategal

Bunny mama
Messages
5,933
DS is Asian. His skin is quite dry and sensitive and can scar easily and I know this is common for many people of color. Super hydrating products are encouraged for him so his skin won't become aahy and sry. There is a whole protocol that helps him. Regular run of the mill products don't work. Natural share butter and coconut work well.

I assume as he ages this will also be protective against wrinkles. I assume that these ladies have had many years of using protective strategies for their skin as well. They look fabulous. Good on them.
 

FunnyBut

Well-Known Member
Messages
4,934
I guessed wrong. I totally thought Malia Obama was the mother, and expected a huge scandal to ensue.

I do think the mother is blessed with youth, but more extraordinary and deceptive is how much she resembles her daughter.
 

skategal

Bunny mama
Messages
5,933
I guessed correctly based on one looking more tired than the other two. Clearly that had to be the mom....haha!
 

aftershocks

Well-Known Member
Messages
15,405
I have a question. Isn't this a racial stereotype? Are only negative stereotypes about black people unacceptable, but positive ones are lauded? :EVILLE::p

On a more serious note, I've heard that black and Asian people tend to have more oily skin, which is protective against wrinkling.
I don't think the youthful appearance is due to oily skin, as I believe oily, dry, and combination skin are fairly random among ethnic groups (although oily/ dry hair and hair texture/ structure is a different thing). I seriously doubt that all blacks tend toward oily skin. Skin pigmentation also varies across a wide spectrum among black people. I believe the key to having smooth, young-looking skin is generally in the melanin and perhaps something in the genes. But I also think for most people generally, it has something to do with diet and lifestyle and living as stress-free a life as possible.

My grandmother on my father's side lived to 106 (she was fair-skinned though so her long life was probably largely due to having a healthy set of genes; she had severe osteoporosis and arthritis, but generally ate extremely well throughout her life; she was an excellent cook). My grandmother on my mother's side died young from pneumonia. Meanwhile, the famous Delaney sisters lived to over 100 years of age. Neither of them married, and partly attributed their long life to that fact, in addition to practicing yoga daily. ;) https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Having_Our_Say:_The_Delany_Sisters'_First_100_Years

There's lots of positives to celebrate among all ethnic groups. And anyway, what's wrong with celebrating positives about black people? There's certainly a lot to celebrate, which usually tends to be overlooked.

BTW, if you look closely, I think it's easy to see which of the young-looking ladies in the photo is the mother. Although, she certainly doesn't look like their mother, just more like a slightly older sister.

On the issue of skin, the sun does a great deal of damage to everyone's skin, and especially so when your skin lacks protective melanin. Victorian ladies didn't wear those hats for nothing. I don't know whether this video was posted here before. I thought I might have seen it posted in another thread awhile ago, showing what skin looks like under ultraviolet light:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o9BqrSAHbTc How the Sun Sees You
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TBEbMQzjKgc How the Sun Ages You


ETA:
Interesting scientific discovery related to melanin and it's mutation among early Europeans approximately 8,000 years ago:
http://www.ancient-origins.net/news-evolution-human-origins/white-skin-developed-europe-only-recently-8000-years-020287

I don't think the simulation photo of the evolving humans that accompanies the article is exactly an accurate representation, since there were tall humans in Africa as well as in Europe. Africa is where the highest civilizations existed during ancient times.
 
Last edited:

Cachoo

Well-Known Member
Messages
7,031
I have a question. Isn't this a racial stereotype? Are only negative stereotypes about black people unacceptable, but positive ones are lauded? :EVILLE::p

On a more serious note, I've heard that black and Asian people tend to have more oily skin, which is protective against wrinkling.

No, I watched the Oprah episode about melanin. It is no stereotype; it is science. Lucky Oprah! Lucky black people!
From "The Science behind "Black Don't Crack"
Introduction to Melanin: The Darker Berry....

The skin and aging discussion must include the skin pigment called melanin. Melanin is mostly responsible for the determination of skin color and increased melanin is associated with darker skin. Studies confirm that increased melanin allows for better protection against the harmful effects of UV light.

Specifically, melanin has been found to play a role in preventing DNA damage from ultraviolet light and malignant transformation of skin cells. As such, it slows down the appearance of wrinkles and rough skin as well as liver spots that can result over time from the process of continued cellular repair.
 

Gazpacho

Well-Known Member
Messages
5,893
I'm assuming it describes how darker skin doesn't wrinkle as fast as lighter skin? I think it's not an uncommon phenomenon, but of course, it depends on the individual and how they take care of themselves. My dad is going to be 80 this year and looks at least 15 years younger. But my mom, who is light-skinned, is now 69 and looks 10 or 12 years younger as well. So I think it's a load of horse pucky, and really not something really significant when looking at 2 16 year olds and a 35 year old mom! :)
As Cachoo said, there is scientific evidence supporting "black don't crack". I think another factor, in addition to melanin, is that when they do crack, it's not as visible because of their darker skin. A shadow from a wrinkle is really obvious on pale skin, but the same shadow isn't so obvious on darker skin.

I guessed correctly which one was the mom, but I thought there was a big giveaway that has nothing to do with how old the mom looks in the face.
The mom has a suit jacket on, which would be rare for a teenager to be wearing
I guessed correctly based on her neck. That said she looks very young for her age.
I guessed correctly based on one looking more tired than the other two. Clearly that had to be the mom....haha!
Wow, you guys are clever!

The mom does probably look younger than I do, but I also think the daughters look older than teenagers, which adds to the challenge.
That's interesting that the kids don't look younger than their age, but the mom does. I wonder if they mom looked young for her age when she was a teenager, or whether she looked her age but then time stopped. Kobe Bryant seemed to stop aging in his mid 20's. LeBron James looked old for his age when he was a teenager, but he hasn't changed much since then.
 

altai_rose

Well-Known Member
Messages
3,195
Gotcha, thanks for the explanation! Once there's scientific evidence, it can no longer be a stereotype.
 

topaz

Well-Known Member
Messages
14,349
I have dry skin and I only have fine lines around my eyes, mostly due to my allergies.

My skin tone is deep as are the women on my mom's side and there are very little wrinkles. My dad's side of the family has more diverse skin tones but youth quality is there.

I do think the darker the skin and genes matter quite a bit along with the quality of life you live.

Those who drink more alcohol and smoke may show their age more. However, we all have so many options to improve one's skin quality(male or female) if the person chooses.
 

snoopy

Well-Known Member
Messages
11,420
Gotcha, thanks for the explanation! Once there's scientific evidence, it can no longer be a stereotype.
That is only one person's opinion. No offense to cachoo but she doesn't make the official call. I think this thread is based on a stereotype. Of course not all black people age well even if many do and even if melanin helps.
 
Last edited:

Cachoo

Well-Known Member
Messages
7,031
That is only one person's opinion. No offense to cachoo but she doesn't make the official call. I think this thread is based on a stereotype. Of course not all black people age well even if many do and even if melanin helps.
None taken! I enjoy the back and forth on these subjects.
 

Users Who Are Viewing This Thread (Users: 0, Guests: 1)

Top