Best Silver medal LP performance (2) in the Olympics by a man

Best Silver medal LP performance (2) by Men in the Olympics

  • Shoma Uno (2018)

    Votes: 4 4.0%
  • Patrick Chan (2014)

    Votes: 6 6.1%
  • Evgeny Plushenko (2010)

    Votes: 9 9.1%
  • Stephan Lambiel (2006)

    Votes: 11 11.1%
  • Evgeny Plushenko (2002)

    Votes: 12 12.1%
  • Elvis Stojko (1998)

    Votes: 4 4.0%
  • Elvis Stojko (1994)

    Votes: 19 19.2%
  • Paul Wylie (1992)

    Votes: 43 43.4%
  • Brian Orser (1988)

    Votes: 44 44.4%
  • Other

    Votes: 3 3.0%

  • Total voters
    99
  • This poll will close: .

Vash01

Fan of Yuzuru, Three A's, T&M, P&C
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So many to choose from, many Singles male skaters have produced great performances to win the silver medal in the Olympics (sometimes a disappointment, sometimes a thrill).

Pick 2 best silver medal performances by Men (singles) skaters in the Olympics.
 

Vash01

Fan of Yuzuru, Three A's, T&M, P&C
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I am surprised that Stojko's 1994 silver got more votes than his 1998. He made a major error in 1994 (popped the 3A into a single, then he replaced the quad with a clean 3A). He did not plan a quad in 1998, I think, due to injury, but it was heroic to skate clean.
 

jenny12

Well-Known Member
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7,335
I chose Paul Wylie and Elvis Stojko, though there’s also a case for Plushenko in 2002.

1. Paul Wylie’s performance in 1992 was everything you could want from an Olympic moment. He performed with such command and freedom while matching the grand sweep of his music with his expansive skating.

2. Elvis Stojko was never my favorite skater but he had a program that was perfect for him and performed it fully.

Plushenko’s performance was very free and commanding during the first half but he ran out of gas by the end. Also, Brian Orser was great in both 84 and 88.
 
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anonymoose_au

Well-Known Member
Messages
202
Plushy's 2002 Carmen LP for sure!

He literally had NO chance at gold, but he went out there and gave it everything he had, the 4-3-3 attempt, the 3A-half loop-3S. He wasn't going down without a fight. It was glorious.

Honestly it's what's missing in the Russian men these days, that conviction, that ability to rise to the challenge even when victory is all but lost.

Also I love that program, it's so ambitious, Plushy plays all the main characters :) even Carmen herself. It's so extra.
 

Vash01

Fan of Yuzuru, Three A's, T&M, P&C
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51,724
Plushy's 2002 Carmen LP for sure!

He literally had NO chance at gold, but he went out there and gave it everything he had, the 4-3-3 attempt, the 3A-half loop-3S. He wasn't going down without a fight. It was glorious.

Honestly it's what's missing in the Russian men these days, that conviction, that ability to rise to the challenge even when victory is all but lost.

Also I love that program, it's so ambitious, Plushy plays all the main characters :) even Carmen herself. It's so extra.

Yagudin, Plushenko, Kulik, even Urmanov defined the golden age of Russian men's skating. It seems to have gone forever.
 

Japanfan

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24,756
I am surprised that Stojko's 1994 silver got more votes than his 1998. He made a major error in 1994 (popped the 3A into a single, then he replaced the quad with a clean 3A). He did not plan a quad in 1998, I think, due to injury, but it was heroic to skate clean.

He had a groin injury in '98 and was obviously in pain during his skate. Then he limped to the podium in running shoes to accept his silver medal.

Like Elvis or hate him, it's undeniable that he was one fierce competitor.

ETA: In '94 Urmanov also made a major mistake. So, one each. I thought Elvis's 'Dragon' was iconic and wish more skaters would skate to martial arts themed program. Even so, Urmy was just so magical for me on the day. Loved those big ruffled things, and Urmy is really delicious eye candy.

Even so, Elvis's skate was also memorable. Elvis had to fight for every medal and ounce of recognition he got - usually by technical superiority. However, I found it sad when he came back for the 2002 OG skating the same program he did in 94.
 
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tony

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10,259
I pick Orser 1988 and Stojko 1994. Orser, even with one small mistake in his Calgary free skate, was still electrifying.

The reason I wasn't as eager to pick Plushenko in 2002, even with a great technical skate, was the fact that he needed help from someone else if he was going to beat Yagudin-- so the pressure may have really been off of him. Had this competition been like the Grand Prix Final just a few months prior, Plushenko would've been the top spot on my list for sure. That event was so intense.

Even so, Elvis's skate was also memorable. Elvis had to fight for every medal and ounce of recognition he got - usually by technical superiority. However, I found it sad when he came back for the 2002 OG skating the same program he did in 94.
Seeing the real clunkers he had basically from 1998-2001, especially The Mummy with the literal copy of Yagudin's Egyptian movement choreo :lol: , I'm happy he went back to the 'best of' programs in 2002. The 1998 program was nervy but I didn't include it because I simply thought the composition of the program as a whole was pretty meh (and he was 3rd in the LP anyways to Candeloro, who had one of the most memorable free skates of the decade, if not ever).
 

anonymoose_au

Well-Known Member
Messages
202
Oh yeah I just realised that you could vote for two. I also voted for Plushy in 2010. I know a lot of people didn't like Tango Amore at all and that it was a really messy skate.

But I still remember being gobsmacked at how Plushy landed those off-axis jumps. Like I was so impressed. :lol: I thought "This guy must be the best skater in the world to be able to do that!" and I wasn't even a mad fangirl at the time.

Also I just really loved the costume.
 

skateboy

Well-Known Member
Messages
7,497
I went for Plushy in 2002 as my first choice.

Orser as a second choice. He fought hard, although he doubled a planned 2nd 3A and stepped out of a 3F. For me, Boitano was a clear winner. I remember enjoying Orser's passionate skate, but thinking that his arms flailed too much (for my taste).
 

SmallFairy

#teamtrainwreck #teamjapan
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He had a groin injury in '98 and was obviously in pain during his skate. Then he limped to the podium in running shoes to accept his silver medal.

Like Elvis or hate him, it's undeniable that he was one fierce competitor.

ETA: In '94 Urmanov also made a major mistake. So, one each. I thought Elvis's 'Dragon' was iconic and wish more skaters would skate to martial arts themed program. Even so, Urmy was just so magical for me on the day. Loved those big ruffled things, and Urmy is really delicious eye candy.
Elvis was indeed fierce, I enjoyed his power and all in-attitude, and what a great jumper he was. But me too adored Urmanov. IIRC Urmanov’s mistake wasn’t that severe. He had a wonky landing on his 3f, ended up close to boards and did a turn, but he stayed on one foot.
 

SmallFairy

#teamtrainwreck #teamjapan
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I went for Plushy in 2002 as my first choice.

Orser as a second choice. He fought hard, although he doubled a planned 2nd 3A and stepped out of a 3F. For me, Boitano was a clear winner. I remember enjoying Orser's passionate skate, but thinking that his arms flailed too much (for my taste).
I have no idea how it ended up being so close between the two Brian’s. Boitano is definitely the clear winner for me too. Orser I felt was a bit frantic and tried a bit too hard. His tech content was also lower.
 

Japanfan

Well-Known Member
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24,756

Elvis was indeed fierce, I enjoyed his power and all in-attitude, and what a great jumper he was. But me too adored Urmanov. IIRC Urmanov’s mistake wasn’t that severe. He had a wonky landing on his 3f, ended up close to boards and did a turn, but he stayed on one foot.
And Elvis only made a small error also - doubling a triple, IIRC.
 

Vash01

Fan of Yuzuru, Three A's, T&M, P&C
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I have no idea how it ended up being so close between the two Brian’s. Boitano is definitely the clear winner for me too. Orser I felt was a bit frantic and tried a bit too hard. His tech content was also lower.
Orser was artistically superior. He made two technical errors. One on the 3f step out, and the other was doubling the 3A. IMO the latter hurt him more than the more visible one on the 3f. Boitano had two 3As and a 3f3t combination. The tie breaker was technical that year. So Boitano won.
 
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jenny12

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I have no idea how it ended up being so close between the two Brian’s. Boitano is definitely the clear winner for me too. Orser I felt was a bit frantic and tried a bit too hard. His tech content was also lower.

Agreed. The power, the immense ice coverage. I loved Orser but his skating looked small compared to Boitano’s.
 

Panja

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68
I am not even a real fan of Plushenko's skating but his Carmen in 2002 was great (although I liked his rival better), and I thought he skated great too in 2010. Having said that, we could only vote for two but I loved Stojko especially in 1994 (and he did win the WC after) and Paul Wylie's skate in 1992 was such a moment.
 

alj5

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3,483
I'm also going with Wylie & 1994 Stojko. Wylie was just amazing and imho should've won the event.

1994 Stojko had a program that was hands down my favorite program from him, and even though he popped the 3A the rest of his skating was rock solid and was about as "artistic" as he could get.
 

caseyedwards

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obviously plushenko in Vancouver. He did quad triples triple axels level 4 spins had oodles of personality and hip thrusts and dynamite facial expressions. He deserves credit for being the most technically advanced jumper in Vancouver
 

jenny12

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7,335
obviously plushenko in Vancouver. He did quad triples triple axels level 4 spins had oodles of personality and hip thrusts and dynamite facial expressions

I’m pretty sure he lost the gold because the judges felt attacked by those hip thrusts. 😜
 

caseyedwards

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I’m pretty sure he lost the gold because the judges felt attacked by those hip thrusts. 😜
He had to be plushenko he couldn’t be an Inman Carroll or morozov! Tons of men hired Morozov for 2010 and first thing he told all of them- “don’t do quads”
 
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blue_idealist

Well-Known Member
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2,611
I am surprised that Stojko's 1994 silver got more votes than his 1998. He made a major error in 1994 (popped the 3A into a single, then he replaced the quad with a clean 3A). He did not plan a quad in 1998, I think, due to injury, but it was heroic to skate clean.
I picked Stojko in 1994 since I was comparing these in relation to how the gold medal winners skated, not just with each other. Plushenko '02 was my second choice since he probably would have won any other Olympics if he didn't have to compete against the great Yagudin. It was hard to leave out Orser and Wylie, especially since I think Wylie should have won over Petrenko in the end, but like the '94 ladies, the '92 men's event was fairly weak.
 

floskate

Vacant
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9,829
Orser all the way. Also why aren't Orser 1984 (amazing) and Jan Hoffmann 1980 (also amazing) not options? Remember, had they used factored placements in 1980 (came into effect in 1981), Jan would be the Olympic champion. He'd been competing since 1968, overcome knee injuries which derailed 1976, staying in and then skated the performance of his life when it mattered most 12 years later. He doesn't get the respect he deserves IMO.
 

bardtoob

Clichy Competitive Audition Protocol Auditor
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briancoogaert

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13,531
My choices are Orser 88 and Wyllie 92.
Orser because he was so close to being perfect, just a slightly error on the 3F, too bad.
And Wyllie because of the performance he delivered, I love watching it, even 30 years later, and the fact that I think Petrenko was overscored :p ).
 

Marco

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I don't "get" the Orser love. For me Boitano and even Petrenko in 1988 had more attention to detail in their programs. Looking back I am surprised he was that close to gold. Boitano may be bland to some but he didn't display much weakness in that program. Orser only had 1 3axel, no 3/3s and an awkward mistake.

I also don't get Wylie. Yes the choreography was nice and he executed it well - but those jumps were tiny, esp next to Petrenko, and he couldn't even do a 3/3 or a good 3/2.

Too bad Patrick Chan couldn't replicate that Trophee Eric Bompard performance in Sochi.
 

Dai's Blues for Klook

Active Member
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108
I picked Wylie and Stojko (1994) because I thought they should have won, lol.

Would have picked Lambiel if we were talking about the SPs! I've watched it 100s of times.

I don't get Orser's 1988 LP either. 😅
 

jenny12

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It was hard to leave out Orser and Wylie, especially since I think Wylie should have won over Petrenko in the end, but like the '94 ladies, the '92 men's event was fairly weak.

Agreed. I’ve always enjoyed Petrenko’s balletic style but the amount of mistakes he made in his free program in 92 was almost ridiculous.

I enjoyed Orser as a skater but when you compare him to Boitano, I think the difference is pretty clear. Boitano skated like he could get across the entire rink with a single crossover.
 

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