2018 U.S. Elections - Midterms & More

MacMadame

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DORISPULASKI

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I know. Not all the sexists are on the political right.
http://amp.slate.com/news-and-polit...ock-turner.html#click=https://t.co/CcBpNybtvs

Yes, it will be all the Recall-Yes folks' fault that mass incarceration will occur, I hear. :rolleyes:

The terrible feminists should just suck it up and go back to the days when nice girls who got raped did not report it. Like before 1977
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edith's_50th_Birthday

Otherwise more POC will get even more excessive sentences, he claims, thus attempting (again just like Trump) to drive a wedge between white women and POC.

Instead, how about calling for a recall of judges giving excessive sentences to POC vs. whites, rather than touting an almost free pass for young, white rapists?
 
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Artistic Skaters

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I have a mixed opinion about the recall of the judge. He did not outdo himself to make a statement of empathy for the victim during the trial, however it seemed more inappropriately boorish than a recall issue. And since he used the probation guidelines for sentencing, it doesn't really get to the root cause of the problem, as noted by the prosecutor of the case who pursued a longer sentence but disagreed with the recall. The recall is a victory for the movement but a reasonable case can also be made that changing the probation guidelines & strengthening the laws is more beneficial than recalling the judge.

ETA: On the other side of the spectrum, Brock Turner's appeal was supposed to be June 28, but will be rescheduled for a later date. Perhaps too close to recall?
*** Oral arguments delayed in Brock Turner appeal case :
https://www.daytondailynews.com/new...ck-turner-appeal-case/Om5LNepaF9mBUjoYwVvNRL/
 
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DORISPULASKI

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Appeal?

So didn't the judge say he believed Turner showed contrition for the rape and took responsibility for his actions, which was one reason for the minimal sentence?

I take it he is not going to plead guilty on this appeal? :rolleyes:
 

MacMadame

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The problem is that the judge's statements at trial showed a bias toward Turner that was not supported by the evidence. He talked about Turner being contrite, for example, when he very clearly wasn't.

The Recall campaign went through his past cases and found a pattern of him being extra easy on defendants like Turner, especially Stanford alum. I thought it was very clear that the judge identified with Turner too much and that impacted his judgement. He also made comments that showed he didn't "get it" when it came to sexual assault.

All the No side could come up with in response is to call anyone who planned to vote Yes names (they were emotional, ignorant, liars, etc.) and use the slippery slope fallacy.

Given that, I can live with his recall.

Plus, they have changed the minimum sentence for this particular crime. So it's possible to do both.
 

attyfan

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Appeal?

So didn't the judge say he believed Turner showed contrition for the rape and took responsibility for his actions, which was one reason for the minimal sentence?

I take it he is not going to plead guilty on this appeal? :rolleyes:
An appeal deals with legal errors made at Turner's trial (such as whether the jury was correctly instructed, etc); It is not a proceeding where there are pleas of any kind. Only if the appellate court finds some error so severe that Turner should be given a new trial will Turner have an opportunity to enter a plea (assuming he wants to).
 

ballettmaus

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The chairmen of the DCCC and NRCC each expressed their opinion on how hacked material should be handled. https://edition.cnn.com/2018/06/07/politics/midterm-election-hack-dccc-nrcc-meeting/index.html

Rep. Ben Ray Luján, the chairman of the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee, said campaigns should "absolutely not" use those materials against opponents "in any form or fashion."

But his counterpart at the National Republican Congressional Committee, Rep. Steve Stivers, said he wouldn't "run down one of my candidates for using something that's in the public domain."


"The media needs to understand when they're reporting about stolen, hacked materials, that you're contributing to the encouragement of the stealing of those documents," Luján said.

"Half the reporters in here have covered it, Ben," a laughing Stivers said.

"I understand that," Luján shot back. "We all have a responsibility to make sure that we're protecting our democracy and fighting against foreign actors in America."
This! x infinity!
 

Artistic Skaters

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According to previous articles, Brock Turner & family have been very outspoken that they don't believe he is a Tier III sex offender & should not have to remain on the registry. It sounds like they are pursuing the appeal hoping to have him removed from the list. They also wanted all those statements about BT's super duper values & integrity submitted by his friends & teachers included but they were not accepted during the trial. :rolleyes:
 

ilovepaydays

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Yes, I know I haven't posted an update in awhile, but I wanted to wait for a bunch of hotly contested primaries to get through. Also, I want to change my update posts to make them shorter/concise. I think most major primaries will be contested by July. Sorry! :saint:
-------------------------------

That being said - there are some interesting primaries coming up this Tuesday, and I think there are many FSUers who live in these states.......

June 12, 2018 Primary - Races to watch
  • Maine
    • U.S. House: ME-02 - Bruce Poliquin in the only Republican House member in that entire region. District is on Democrats' target list.
    • U.S. Senate: Angus King is an Independent but he currently caucuses with the Democrats. The Democrats and GOP are having primaries for their candidates, but they all suck. King is likely safe for re-election.
    • Governor: LaPage is term limited for re-election, but he is REALLY REALLY unpopular.
  • North Dakota
    • U.S. Senate: Heidi Heitkamp (Democrat) is in the same red state vulnerable camp as other Democrats like Nelson(Florida), Donnelly (Indiana), Tester (Montana), McCaskill (Missouri), and Manchin (West Virginia). The GOP could easily flip this seat.
    • U.S. House: At large seat (Kevin Cramer) is safe. The Democrats would be smart to focus on Sen. Heitkamp getting re-elected.
  • Nevada
    • U.S. Senate: Dean Heller is probably the most vulnerable Republican running for re-election.
    • U.S. House: NV-03 is on Democrats' target list. Rosen is running for the Senate seat.
    • Governor: Sandoval (Republican) is term limited - but the Democrats could have a pickup here.
  • South Carolina
    • U.S. House: All seats are beyond gerrymandered.
    • Governor: Harry McMaster (Republican), who was the Lt. Governor and succeeded Nikki Haley, will probably win the general election easily. He just has to survive this primary - and probably the runoff if he doesn't get 50%.
  • Virginia
    • U.S. House: Several seats are vulnerable for GOP, but what happens in VA-10 (Comstock) will likely be an indicator how the general election night will go for Democrats and Republicans.
    • U.S. Senate: Who gets the GOP nod to go against Tim Kaine is just :watch:, to say the least. Kaine is pretty safe, but if Corey Stewart or E.W. Jackson wins the GOP nod, the ads won't be. Hopefully, Nick Freitas will win the GOP primary and all will probably be right in the world.
 
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ballettmaus

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The Supreme Court upheld Ohio's voter purge practices. https://www.washingtonpost.com/poli...d043e33f1dc_story.html?utm_term=.d31974ba559d

Decisions like this one is why I think that relying on November doesn't work (and why I think that people (also) need to go out on the streets and protest like they did in the late 60s if they really want to change anything).
It makes me fear that come election day voters who did vote in the last election will find out that they've been removed from voter rolls "accidentially".
 

ballettmaus

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People just need to be aware of the shenanigans and re-register. Disciplined voting practices are the only way to change things.
In an ideal world, that is all that they have to do.
In the real world, since this targets minority voters, they may not be aware for some reason or another. It might also be used to suppress the vote and voters who did vote will be purged anyway and they won't find out until election day.

I'm not arguing that people should not turn out to vote. I'm saying that voters shoudn't rely solely on an election that is done with a system that has not only been breached by a foreign power but has also been abused in many ways to bring change. I also think it's dangerous to let everything hinge on midterms and sit tight until then. November is still five months away. A lot can happen in five months and I don't trust Republicans to play fair and not to suppress the minority vote wherever and however they can.


On a side note, I think history has shown that that voting is not the only way to change things. Voting did not make the wall come down. The people and their protests did.
Women didn't gain the right to vote because of voting (obviously ;)).
And while my knowledge is less extensive, I believe that the Civil Rights Movement and the protests/marches played a significant part in the end of segregation.
A more recent example that protests work is Armenia. They forced their Prime Minister to resign.
 

Peaches LaTour

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https://www.nytimes.com/2018/06/06/us/politics/judge-perksy-brock-turner-recall.html

Judge Aaron Persky, who sentenced Stanford student Brock Turner to 6 months for rape, was recalled in California's election yesterday, the first time a judge has been recalled in CA in 80 years.
And Turner is appealing his conviction.

The ouster of the judge wasn't poplar with quite a few people within the ranks of the judicial system, saying it sets a dangerous precedence.

However, I applaud his removal.
 

ballettmaus

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Protests only work if they influence voters.
Protests work if protesters turn out in droves. Yes, it does require a certain amount of influencing but I think that usually when there are mass protests, it's because enough people are already fed up with a situation and it's the people in power who need to be influenced/who they want to influence.

The wall came down because of numbers of protesters and persistance not because of any votes and/or elections. The GDR was ultimately a dictatorship.

And in Armenia the people protested right after the elections because their prime minister tried to circumvent term limits. https://www.washingtonpost.com/news...theyre-in-the-streets/?utm_term=.1ed120cbe5e0

I don't know the exact process that led to the 19th amendment and the Civil Rights Act but I'm sure that without persistence and the numbers of activists none of the people in power would have bothered to make any changes.

I'm under the impression that a lot of Americans are fed up and that many are aware of the dangers. Those in a leading role also keep pointing it out and they tweet and speak in anger and condemn. But I've not seen a single one calling for protests and it baffles me. It seems like the next logical step (since everything else didn't seem to have worked up until now) and I'm sure if one of them started to protest, others would follow. It doesn't mean that they don't need to vote and that they shouldn't try to mobilize voters. But as I said, it's a long time until November and there is something that can be done now.
 
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VALuvsMKwan

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Abigail Spanberger will be "getting up in the grill" of the appropriately named Dave Brat in my Virginia Congressional district's election in November.
 

Vash01

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Protests work if protesters turn out in droves. Yes, it does require a certain amount of influencing but I think that usually when there are mass protests, it's because enough people are already fed up with a situation and it's the people in power who need to be influenced/who they want to influence.

The wall came down because of numbers of protesters and persistance not because of any votes and/or elections. The GDR was ultimately a dictatorship.

And in Armenia the people protested right after the elections because their prime minister tried to circumvent term limits. https://www.washingtonpost.com/news...theyre-in-the-streets/?utm_term=.1ed120cbe5e0

I don't know the exact process that led to the 19th amendment and the Civil Rights Act but I'm sure that without persistence and the numbers of activists none of the people in power would have bothered to make any changes.

I'm under the impression that a lot of Americans are fed up and that many are aware of the dangers. Those in a leading role also keep pointing it out and they tweet and speak in anger and condemn. But I've not seen a single one calling for protests and it baffles me. It seems like the next logical step (since everything else didn't seem to have worked up until now) and I'm sure if one of them started to protest, others would follow. It doesn't mean that they don't need to vote and that they shouldn't try to mobilize voters. But as I said, it's a long time until November and there is something that can be done now.
In an ideal world, that is all that they have to do.
In the real world, since this targets minority voters, they may not be aware for some reason or another. It might also be used to suppress the vote and voters who did vote will be purged anyway and they won't find out until election day.

I'm not arguing that people should not turn out to vote. I'm saying that voters shoudn't rely solely on an election that is done with a system that has not only been breached by a foreign power but has also been abused in many ways to bring change. I also think it's dangerous to let everything hinge on midterms and sit tight until then. November is still five months away. A lot can happen in five months and I don't trust Republicans to play fair and not to suppress the minority vote wherever and however they can.


On a side note, I think history has shown that that voting is not the only way to change things. Voting did not make the wall come down. The people and their protests did.
Women didn't gain the right to vote because of voting (obviously ;)).
And while my knowledge is less extensive, I believe that the Civil Rights Movement and the protests/marches played a significant part in the end of segregation.
A more recent example that protests work is Armenia. They forced their Prime Minister to resign.
Those are very insightful posts Balletmaus. We in the Democratic Party are perhaps being naive thinking that if people vote, many problems will be solved.

There were protests after Trump was elected, but that seems to have calmed down. We definitely need protests but we also need masses vote democratic to save the country from this monster. Unfortunately the GOP will make it very difficult for certain people to vote, through any means. If that happens, protests must follow, but will they? We can learn a lot from other countries.
 
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VALuvsMKwan

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One can hope that this will just make it that much easier for Sen. Tim Kaine to win re-election - even though there are plenty of die-hard bigots in the Old Dominion.

ETA: I wonder if some of this might be Democrats crossing over to vote for the least electable Republican candidate, since VA has open primaries. Looking at county/city voting stats, there were several localities in Northern VA that went plurality-Stewart where that might be a partial explanation at least.
 
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Wyliefan

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Ugh, this SUCKS. If Democrats did that, it makes me furious. (Not that I'm not already furious at the Republicans.) This isn't a game. There's a real risk this nut could win. I didn't think Trump could win either, and look where we are now.
 

Vash01

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Ugh, this SUCKS. If Democrats did that, it makes me furious. (Not that I'm not already furious at the Republicans.) This isn't a game. There's a real risk this nut could win. I didn't think Trump could win either, and look where we are now.
I doubt that democrats did that in large enough numbers to flip the results. There could be isolated ones, but when you look at the GOP candidates, you have to wonder who is worse?
 

ilovepaydays

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Vash01

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Meanwhile, in California - voters will get to decide if they want to split into three states.

This article shows more details on (by county) how the 3 states would separate. So - I guess - for example - USC will have to rename itself?

Plus, even if this passed - it looks like Congress would have to approve any new states in the union. (Article IV, Section 3, Clause 1 of the U.S. Constitution) What are the odds they will do that?

:watch:
I think it is a stupid idea that came out of the mind of one rich guy. He wants Northern/Southern/Coastal(?) CA.

Are we not divided enough already, as a country?

Hopefully there is enough sanity left in CA to vote out this guy.
 

ballettmaus

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Ugh, this SUCKS. If Democrats did that, it makes me furious. (Not that I'm not already furious at the Republicans.) This isn't a game. There's a real risk this nut could win. I didn't think Trump could win either, and look where we are now.

Apparently, Republican voter turnout was very low, so that could be a reason for Stewart doing well, too. Extremists usually do well when there's low turnout. At least, I'm hoping that's the reason. According to the WaPo he got fewer votes than in the 2017 gubernatorial primary.
In Virginia, Republican turnout was lower than it had been for 2017’s gubernatorial primary; Stewart, who had lost that race with 155,780 votes, won Tuesday’s Senate primary with 136,410 votes.
https://www.washingtonpost.com/poli...80389a4e569_story.html?utm_term=.f0aa47e01a03



I'm already getting election anxiety. I'm not sure if I can take another one like 2016. :(
 

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