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FSU Reading Rainbow (book thread)

Discussion in 'Off The Beaten Track' started by genevieve, Oct 11, 2015.

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  1. genevieve

    genevieve drinky typo pbp, closet hugger Staff Member

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    I just finished reading Tana French's The Secret Place (dumb title, good book, #5 in her Dublin Murder Series), and was wondering where the heck my next book went - I had to unpack my suitcase in the closet, as I'd put in away after my trip without emptying the pockets. I found all kinds of things in there :shuffle:

    So, next up: Bellweather Rhapsody by Kate Racculia. I bought it based on an employee endorsement in the store, but that was 6 weeks ago and I can't recall why, but I'm excited to get started.
     
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  2. Marge_Simpson

    Marge_Simpson Well-Known Member

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    Just read Alexandra Fuller's "Don't Let's Go To The Dogs Tonight". I knew almost nothing about Rhodesia/Zimbabwe, so I did learn something, and her account of growing up there as one of the privileged, was interesting. OTOH, I couldn't like her or any of her family members, a bunch of dysfunctional alcoholics IMO. And unapologetic rascists.
     
  3. oleada

    oleada Well-Known Member

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    I read Dangerous Girls on he plane today, in one sitting. OMFG!

    I did not see it coming at all. I bought the whole thing, hook, line and sinker.
     
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  4. Erin

    Erin Well-Known Member

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    Now I'm going to have the Reading Rainbow song stuck in my head every time I come to this thread (and I would have long forgotten the song if it weren't for the Community episode where Troy meets LeVar Burton and is curled up in the fetal position singing the song).

    It really is that kind of book! I wish there were more that were that good.

    I read The Good Girl one evening late last week and it's very similar to Pretty Baby, although perhaps a little bit stronger. Similar in that there is 3 points of view being told
    including one who appears sinister but has really just had a really rough life
    , there are some shifts back and forth in time, there is a bit of a mystery to what's going on, etc. Also, the only main character that I really liked was the cop, kind of like how the husband was the best character in Pretty Baby. And by the end, I felt sorry for just about everyone involved, with one or two exceptions. I did think it was an interesting choice that even though there were three narrators for most of the book, Mia (the girl who was kidnapped and appears to be the main character from the book's overview description) is not one of the narrators - we don't hear from her until the very end. The epilogue where she speaks is by far the most interesting part of the whole book and probably improved my opinion of the rest of the book. I can't say too much more without spoiling but it was a quick read so if someone is on the fence about reading it, at least it won't take up too much of your time.
     
  5. Susan1

    Susan1 Well-Known Member

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    I just reserved this on the library site (even though it's compared to Gone Girl). It's from 2014. Pretty Baby is 2015. If I like The Good Girl, I'll read that one. Went to Mary Kubica's website. She graduated from Miami University in Ohio!
     
  6. TheGirlCanSkate

    TheGirlCanSkate Well-Known Member

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    My library just got this in so I read it Saturday. http://lgbtweekly.com/2015/08/28/new-childrens-book-highlights-experience-of-transgender-youth/ It was a good read, but more like a middle schooler vs a 4th grader. Mostly because I just read http://www.amazon.com/Gracefully-Gr...8&qid=1444673969&sr=1-22&keywords=transgender and thought they were super similar (both involve a "boy" auditioning for a "girls" role in a class play. I am enjoying this "new" genre for kids and love that mainstream inexpensive publishers like scholastic are selling them. If anyone grew up in a US school, you'll know that scholastic does book sales at schools so it really does put the books into the hands of kids who have a few dollars to buy a book. In both books, there is one adult who is helpful and at least one supportive family member.
     
  7. IceAlisa

    IceAlisa discriminating and persnickety ballet aficionado

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    I am reading it now. Mean girls.
     
  8. puglover

    puglover Well-Known Member

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    I love Tana French's books too. A few times when reading I have laughed out loud. The Irish just have a great turn of phrase. I have been somewhat disappointed in the recent releases of a few authors I look forward to. Sue Grafton, Lee Child - okay - but I kind of had to make myself finish both. I recently read "The Bullet" by Mary Louise Kelly as it had great reviews. I really liked it. It was an intriguing concept and a little far fetched at times but I liked her writing style and the book held my interest. I am now reading another book of hers - "Anonymous Sources". I am liking it as well.
     
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  9. IceAlisa

    IceAlisa discriminating and persnickety ballet aficionado

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    Forgot to mention: one of the common criticisms of The Secret Place is that it uses text speak.

    :huh:

    OMG WTF it's the 21st century teenagers talking. Tana French is like totally 4 realz.
     
  10. IceAlisa

    IceAlisa discriminating and persnickety ballet aficionado

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    And another thing: this is something I've been wondering for years. Why are American girls (and Irish girls too, it seems) taught that all boys want is sex but girls don't want it nearly as much and are all about the romance, or being liked. :huh:

    Don't girls have hormones too? Why are they portrayed as these asexual beings to themselves and others? Don't girls want to have sex too??

    And I haven't met boys who bought into the slut/frigid dichotomy when I was young. Sex wasn't a big deal as long as it was was safe from all perspectives (personal safety, pregnancy prevention and STI prevention). Why is it a big deal here? The gender roles are assigned early on and girls seem to buy into them, to their own detriment.

    In college I was very interested in this, became a counselor at the student health center and taught about safe sex, did outreach programs (in Catholic schools!) on how to put a condom correctly, how to prevent pregnancy and STIs, etc.

    Can't say I learned the answers to the above questions even today.
     
  11. flyingsit

    flyingsit Well-Known Member

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    I just read Martin Pistorius' Ghost Boy and haven't cried that much reading a book in a long time.
     
  12. genevieve

    genevieve drinky typo pbp, closet hugger Staff Member

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    I read a review that complained about that, and it's a leetle over the top, but the way she wrote the actual dialogue? Seemed realistic? It definitely made me "hear" the words in the same way that Faithful Place gave such a strong sense of rhythm among the older Mackeys. The only places that felt a little cringe-y were the many mentions of musical artists. That seemed more gratuitous in a "this is what Teh Kidz are talking about!" way than providing a frame for the story or any of the characters. Oh, and that title. Not that it's a terrible title for a book (although it's not great), but the item in the story to which it refers would just not be called that. I think it was just to connect the titles of her two Mackey family books.

    I do love the way French moves each book along, taking a previous side character and making them the focus of the next book. I think she's realized that Frank Mackey is her best character, and pulling a minor character from 2 books back instead of her last one (Broken Harbour) was a good choice.
     
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  13. IceAlisa

    IceAlisa discriminating and persnickety ballet aficionado

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    So far I have seen Justin Beiber mention but it was by the nearly middle-aged detective. I am only around page 180, damn you, work.

    The title does seem hackneyed but as you said, it serves a purpose. What do you think that board would have been called instead? The bitching place? I certainly have no idea.
     
  14. agalisgv

    agalisgv Well-Known Member

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    Sure, but oftentimes girls desire sex with the expectation that it leads to a relationship of some sort. Guys don't necessarily assume sex=relationship to the same extent some girls do.

    But those are generalities, and as such, won't apply to many individuals.
    Because from a religious POV, sex is supposed to be reserved for marriage. And the US is substantially more religious than many portions of Europe, and certainly compared to the Soviet Union back in the day. I think as people become less religious, there are less inhibitions WRT sex. But it still informs a larger cultural ethos of sex being something special that you share with a partner in a serious, monogamous relationship (h/t Patti Stanger :D).
     
  15. IceAlisa

    IceAlisa discriminating and persnickety ballet aficionado

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    But why should that be the case? I say, it shouldn't, but I am, at heart, a rude Euro, at least in this context.
    *shaking my head*
     
  16. agalisgv

    agalisgv Well-Known Member

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    I just think that it tends to be the case, whether it should or not--at least in many portions of the US.
     
  17. Prancer

    Prancer Cursed for all time Staff Member

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    For me, sex was always a terribly, terribly risky proposition. The specter of pregnancy and the consequences of that were always hovering over me, to the point that it overrode all else. And much of that came from religion.
     
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  18. TheGirlCanSkate

    TheGirlCanSkate Well-Known Member

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    I think most books for teens in the US are still based on moral literature in the 1900's. Present lessons and if you break rules, you fail. If you follow them, you succeed. There have been some breakouts - Judy Blume for example. I suppose a parent, my generation grew up with the Just say no to drugs movement and we hoped our kids would say no to sex.

    Instead of being something special, sex seems to have a more violent message now. Instead of reading what I read in Cosmo as a teen (if I want sex I'll have it and use a diaphragm or the pill - even with strangers in the airport (ha ha ha)), but it seems now girls are not taught there is a pleasure involved and are just used like toys to satisfy boys.

    I just read Marcus Samuelsson's biography and he says the reason he was adopted was because in Sweden, single parenting and abortions don't have the same stigma as they do in the US. This results in very few unwanted infants, so they had to look abroad to adopt a son. A very different climate in the US.
     
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  19. agalisgv

    agalisgv Well-Known Member

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    That's actually true for the US too--at least in comparison to the 1950's and before. That's why there is such a shortage of newborns available for adoption, and why so many either adopt older children, first become foster parents, or adopt abroad.
     
  20. IceAlisa

    IceAlisa discriminating and persnickety ballet aficionado

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    I assume no birth control/condoms was available. Thankfully, it seems at least this has changed. But the mentality persists. It shocks me every time a woman who claims to be a feminist, uses the word "slut." What is the male equivalent of that?
     
  21. agalisgv

    agalisgv Well-Known Member

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    gigolo
     
  22. MacMadame

    MacMadame Cat Lady-in-Training

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    Slut.

    No, a gigolo is someone who is in a relationship for money.
     
  23. IceAlisa

    IceAlisa discriminating and persnickety ballet aficionado

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    I have not seen or heard men referred to that way. There is a word in Russian though. Russians never pass up an opportunity to call people names.:D
     
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  24. IceAlisa

    IceAlisa discriminating and persnickety ballet aficionado

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    Last edited: Oct 13, 2015
  25. Prancer

    Prancer Cursed for all time Staff Member

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    Of course birth control and condoms were available. But both had a failure rate and both were very likely to have been discovered in my possession, which would have put me on the street.

    This also applied to my brothers, BTW. But since none of them were going to get pregnant, the implications were a little different for them.
     
  26. PrincessLeppard

    PrincessLeppard Holding Alex Johnson's Pineapple

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    None of my students use "gigolo". Their go-to word is "man-whore." And it isn't necessarily derogative.
     
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  27. puglover

    puglover Well-Known Member

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    "He made her think of a piece of warm bread dipped in olive oil" - I honestly just read that in the current book I am slogging through. Now that is real romantic speak if ever I have heard it.
     
  28. puglover

    puglover Well-Known Member

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    Even better "her rage could boil shrimp". How is that for a descriptive phrase?
     
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  29. IceAlisa

    IceAlisa discriminating and persnickety ballet aficionado

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    :lol: What are you reading!
     
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