Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 21 to 24 of 24
  1. #21
    Internet Beyotch
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    NorCal
    Posts
    15,804
    vCash
    500
    Rep Power
    23556
    Quote Originally Posted by Prancer View Post
    I think the government has the right of it in trying to get the bad schools to become better schools.
    Yes but they tried and tried and the schools didn't get better. At some put you have to give up on them.
    Actual bumper sticker series: Jesus is my co-pilot. Satan is my financial advisor. Budha is my therapist. L. Ron Hubbard owes me $50.

  2. #22

    Join Date
    Apr 2001
    Location
    City of Blinding Light
    Posts
    15,906
    vCash
    500
    Rep Power
    12302
    Corinthian will sell the majority of its campuses, and teach out the remaining five. They are going to offer some kind of refund to certain students, but no details were released on that yet. The sale must happen within six months.

    Some people are working to try to get the loans students have for these colleges discharged, but I don't know if that will happen.
    http://chronicle.com/article/Corinth...&utm_medium=en
    Use Yah Blinkah!

  3. #23
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    At the airport.
    Posts
    129
    vCash
    500
    Rep Power
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by Japanfan View Post
    In that case there not be serious inequities because the graduates of for-profit and regular institutions? In which case, employers would be aware of it? Why then would anyone go to these schools?

    There may be such schools in Canada, but I'm not aware of any. In my view the very concept of a 'for profit' school is bizarre.
    These schools prey on the lower-income student who has little to no knowledge of higher education. For-profit schools don't so much have admission counselors as a sales force. Many prospective students believe the sales pitch. Yet even those who graduate are still deficient in skills needed for a job in their chosen course of study. Employers do know this. For many, a degree earned at these "institutions" are indeed worthless. In fact, there have been public service ads on the NYC subway with photos and short bios of students who have been scammed along with a city hotline to call for questions about one of these schools.

    And yes, the idea of profit associated with education is indeed antithetical to education itself. Most of these schools are not regionally accredited and degrees and credits earned there are not transferable.

  4. #24
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    At the airport.
    Posts
    129
    vCash
    500
    Rep Power
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by Gazpacho View Post
    Yes, there are serious inequities. The students that end up at these schools are often not from educated families and don't know the difference between a for-profit and non-profit. They know it's a college, and a private one, so they infer that the colleges must be better than their local public community colleges. They're drawn in by the fancy advertising, and when they visit the campus or ask for more information, the colleges put on a hard sell and promise the world to them.
    This is so, so true.

    Instead, community colleges are a wonderful resource. And just because it has the heading of "community" does not mean the academic standards are diminished. Here in Massachusetts, many instructors at community colleges are professors at other universities. Community college credits are also transferable; the associate's degree earned at one gains you automatic admission to complete a bachelor's degree at any state university in Massachusetts.

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •