Page 5 of 12 FirstFirst ... 34567 ... LastLast
Results 81 to 100 of 235

Thread: Miss/Ms/Mrs.?

  1. #81

    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Posts
    3,205
    vCash
    400
    Rep Power
    33741
    Quote Originally Posted by Anita18 View Post
    And of course I don't get bent out of shape when strangers call me Mrs. They don't know, they only see the ring on my finger, why should I be mad at them? But I think it's normal to be annoyed when friends and relatives call you that when they know you preferred to be called differently. But yeah, there are more worthy things to be outraged by. Still, annoyance =/= real life non-emoticon outrage.
    you have friends and relatives that call you by a title and not my your name??

  2. #82

    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Posts
    3,205
    vCash
    400
    Rep Power
    33741
    Quote Originally Posted by Louis View Post
    I don't address people by "Dr." either, unless I'm in a physician's office . And, sorry to those of who you prefer to be addressed this way, but I roll my eyes at anyone who insists on being called "Dr" or has "PhD" on a business card outside of an academic or possibly a consulting setting. I find it's a sign of a big ego more than anything else. Most of the PhDs I know in the corporate world don't advertise the fact. Similarly, I find that the most senior executives often don't even include a title but just the name of their department.

    My general rule of thumb is the simpler the business card (no titles, degrees, professional designations, etc.), the more I tend to like the person . And often the more important the person.
    I'm leaning more towards Louis's stance on this, but have a similar no titles outlook.

    Two of my closest friends have PhDs in non medical subjects, and neither use Dr. One of them would be Dr Watson and would forever have the obvious jokes made so she never uses it, the other is the most laid back and brilliant lawyer I've ever known, and her one story about "using" her title cracks me up. She's in her 40s and a renowned expert in her field. During an enquiry she was up against an old male QC whereas she is "just" a solicitor. In the opening they all decide how to refer to one another and my friend just presumed everybody would be on first name terms and referred to the QC by his first name. He pitched a fit and demanded that Mrs Lastname have the common decency to address him as Mr Lastname. To which my friend replied that she would if he could please do her the honour of calling her by her correct title of Dr not Mrs. pissing contest won she went on to wipe the floor with him during the enquiry

  3. #83
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Iowa
    Posts
    11,026
    vCash
    500
    Rep Power
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by Lanie View Post
    I don't know. Ms. I think. Mrs. seems so old to me, I hate going by Mrs. Lastname. My friends are all teaching their kids to call people 'Miss Firstname' which is just weird as well. It seems popular in Christian circles.
    Maybe it is the Texan in me (I grew up calling adults preferedtitle lastname) but I kind of resent that kids in this neighborhood call me by my first name. I'd be fine with Ms. Firstname (not really in the group you described, though I taught preschool, so am used to it). But just first name seems disrespectful. It's going to be doubly hard if I have kids, because I certainly don't want them doing that.

  4. #84
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    completely beside myself
    Posts
    425
    vCash
    500
    Rep Power
    0
    Although I actually don't think anyone should be called "doctor" whether MD, PhD, or whatever (I think everyone, including medical doctors, should be Mr. or Ms.) as long as there is a practice of calling anyone doctor, it should apply equally to all who have earned a doctoral degree. Frankly, I find it very arrogant that anyone should decide on their own that my PhD is somehow less "doctor-worthy" than someone else's MD. According to the academic standards of my country, I earned a doctoral degree -- and thus the title "Dr." -- every bit as much as MDs did, and it's no one's place to decide that I, or others like me, are unworthy of the title.

  5. #85
    Bountifully Enmeshed
    Join Date
    Apr 2001
    Location
    At the Christmas Bizarre
    Posts
    38,171
    vCash
    250
    Rep Power
    47117
    Quote Originally Posted by Anita18 View Post
    That's even worse than what my coworker was faced with at the grad school, when someone at the career center told her to go home and take care of her children. (It's even more laughable when I observed at graduation that most of the graduating classes were women, and a good number of them were mothers! Not many had more than one though...)
    There was a female professor in the department who used to rant about married women and mothers going to grad school because we were just a bunch of bored housewives taking slots that could have been better used by young, single women who might actually have academic careers one day. I never heard anything like that from the male professors, but a lot of them were awfully quiet when she was spouting off.

    One of the women she complained about most later became a professor in the same department. I've always wondered how the two of them get along.

    But grad school, at least when I was there, was not at all the enlightened place that people always seem to think it is.

    Quote Originally Posted by Anita18 View Post
    Apparently he expects he'll become a baby once he got married.
    He told me once that he was going to college so he could get a job that paid well enough that he could afford a wife who would stay home and do nothing but take care of him, so yeah. I may be wrong about this, but I think he was raised by a single mother who cultivated this attitude in Himself.

    I wonder what ever happened to him. I know what became of some of the students in that class, but I can't even remember his name.

    Quote Originally Posted by Skittl1321 View Post
    Maybe it is the Texan in me (I grew up calling adults preferedtitle lastname) but I kind of resent that kids in this neighborhood call me by my first name. I'd be fine with Ms. Firstname (not really in the group you described, though I taught preschool, so am used to it). But just first name seems disrespectful. It's going to be doubly hard if I have kids, because I certainly don't want them doing that.
    I live one of the most conservative burgs in the US, so I guess this is no surprise, but I can't remember a child here ever calling me by my first name. I am always Mrs. Prancer--and its always Mrs., never Ms.
    "The secret to creativity is knowing how to hide your sources."-- Albert Einstein.

  6. #86
    From the Bloc
    Join Date
    Apr 2001
    Location
    California, I wish
    Posts
    17,379
    vCash
    500
    Rep Power
    11617
    Quote Originally Posted by mikemba View Post
    Although I actually don't think anyone should be called "doctor" whether MD, PhD, or whatever (I think everyone, including medical doctors, should be Mr. or Ms.) as long as there is a practice of calling anyone doctor, it should apply equally to all who have earned a doctoral degree. Frankly, I find it very arrogant that anyone should decide on their own that my PhD is somehow less "doctor-worthy" than someone else's MD. According to the academic standards of my country, I earned a doctoral degree -- and thus the title "Dr." -- every bit as much as MDs did, and it's no one's place to decide that I, or others like me, are unworthy of the title.
    Doctor has a two meanings though - there's the person with an advanced degree, and there's the person who practices medicine and is a doctor by profession as well as education. Most people from a very young age have known doctors who practice medicine, so when they think of doctors that's who they think about first. I do think that when people say someone is not a "real" doctor what they usually mean is that they are not the kind of doctor that most people are used to.

    I don't think anyone thinks someone with a PhD is "unworthy" of the title, but I agree with Louis that outside of formal academic and directly related professional settings, it's as irrelevant as any other degree or professional designation or whatever titles or letters after your name you have earned or otherwise have.

    There's also the issue, and this is unfortunate for those who actually earned it, of honorary degrees - one hears about those as they are often bestowed on celebrities or other prominent people, and occasionally one hears that thereafter they insist on being called Dr Celebrity.

  7. #87
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Atlanta
    Posts
    2,404
    vCash
    500
    Rep Power
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by mikemba View Post
    Although I actually don't think anyone should be called "doctor" whether MD, PhD, or whatever (I think everyone, including medical doctors, should be Mr. or Ms.) as long as there is a practice of calling anyone doctor, it should apply equally to all who have earned a doctoral degree. Frankly, I find it very arrogant that anyone should decide on their own that my PhD is somehow less "doctor-worthy" than someone else's MD. According to the academic standards of my country, I earned a doctoral degree -- and thus the title "Dr." -- every bit as much as MDs did, and it's no one's place to decide that I, or others like me, are unworthy of the title.
    I agree with you. I actually was in my medical doctor's office the day after I graduated with my PhD. He made a point of referring to me as doctor in his notes to the nurse. That made me smile. Though he's called me by my first name for 20 years, I was appreciative that he recognized how much work I had done to earn that title. Lately I just use the title to mess with telemarketers.

  8. #88

    Join Date
    Nov 2001
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    24,950
    vCash
    500
    Rep Power
    91872
    Quote Originally Posted by mikemba View Post
    Although I actually don't think anyone should be called "doctor" whether MD, PhD, or whatever (I think everyone, including medical doctors, should be Mr. or Ms.) as long as there is a practice of calling anyone doctor, it should apply equally to all who have earned a doctoral degree. Frankly, I find it very arrogant that anyone should decide on their own that my PhD is somehow less "doctor-worthy" than someone else's MD. According to the academic standards of my country, I earned a doctoral degree -- and thus the title "Dr." -- every bit as much as MDs did, and it's no one's place to decide that I, or others like me, are unworthy of the title.
    ITA. At least in the USA- and I am sure in many other countries- Ph.D.s are called 'Dr.'. The degree is Doctor of Philosophy, so it is perfectly justifiable (although I have never seen the JD's called 'Dr.'). I am not saying that everyone should call me Dr., no matter what the situation, and I wouldn't limit it to academics only. When I went to the Mayo clinic, I was always addressed as 'Dr.' Outside of Mayo, only one of my specialists calls me 'Dr.' I used that title on the form I filled in. All others ignore it and call me Miss or Mrs. (rarely Ms.), or just use my first name (and I am OK with the first name).

    If they call me Mrs. I have to correct them and ask them to call me Ms. Perhaps I should add that I prefer Dr. but either first name or Ms. will be OK. I don't insist that they call me 'Dr.' but I think if they see the title, it will be nice if they paid attention to that. At work, everyone is called by first name so no issue there. However, when I had my email signature as (My full name), Ph.D., outsiders were still calling me either Ms. or Mr. So I dropped the Ph.D. after my name and added 'Dr.' before my name. Still some ignore it and call me Ms. I usually reply that it's OK to call me by my first name, but if they want to be formal, I prefer being addressed as 'Dr.'

    I also noticed that in my Toastmasters group (it's big- I know those in Arizona, and a few others) whenever someone got a Ph.D., they immediately started signing their names as 'Dr.'- both men and women. As someone who finished the Ph.D. long ago (I went straight through BS-MS-PhD), I had felt that it was irrelevant in that environment so I never used it. When I saw others being called Dr. I wanted to be called Dr. too. So sometimes I use it in that environment, but most of the time not. I just don't feel that it fits in, unless the type of speech I am giving would benefit from that extra information.

    Jill Biden- our second lady has a Ph.D. in English literature. She insists that she be called Dr. Biden (not Mrs. Biden) because she says- I earned it.

  9. #89

    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Location
    with the traditionless
    Posts
    5,630
    vCash
    500
    Rep Power
    8583
    So apparently, the title of Dr. is supposed to signify the person deserves respect and a higher position in society? On one hand, I’d like to encourage the recognition of education in our society. But on the other hand,
    What would Jenny do?

  10. #90
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    completely beside myself
    Posts
    425
    vCash
    500
    Rep Power
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by Jenny View Post
    Doctor has a two meanings though - there's the person with an advanced degree, and there's the person who practices medicine and is a doctor by profession as well as education.
    Yes, I agree. But there is a difference: I don't say that I am a "doctor" (common noun, fully spelled out) as my profession. But the title that goes before my name is "Dr." every bit as much as it is for an MD.

    With reference to just calling people by their first names, I have 2 thoughts on this. I prefer the practice of referring to someone formally unless they invite you to address them by first name.

    Also, I don't believe in calling some people by title and others by first name. For example, it really irks me when I get a call saying "This is Dr. Smith's office calling for Mikemba." If they address the physician formally then they should address the patient formally. And if they take the liberty (which I don't like) of addressing the patient informally, then they should refer to the physician by his/her first name as well.

    So I say, either informal for everyone or formal for everyone, with my prefernce being to start with titles until you agree that both of you will go by first names.

  11. #91

    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Location
    BC
    Posts
    9,148
    vCash
    500
    Rep Power
    36769
    So I say, either informal for everyone or formal for everyone, with my prefernce being to start with titles until you agree that both of you will go by first names.
    So, elementary teachers should refer to their students as Mr. and Miss?

  12. #92
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    completely beside myself
    Posts
    425
    vCash
    500
    Rep Power
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by snoopy View Post
    So apparently, the title of Dr. is supposed to signify the person deserves respect and a higher position in society?
    No. That's why I said that I think that everyone should be called simply "Mr./Ms." no matter what their education.

    However, as long as the tradition of calling people with doctorates "Dr." continues, I don't think anyone should decide that some people who have earned the title "Dr." should get it (e.g. MDs), while other people who have also earned it (e.g. PhDs) should be considered undeserving of their titles.

  13. #93
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    completely beside myself
    Posts
    425
    vCash
    500
    Rep Power
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by manhn View Post
    So, elementary teachers should refer to their students as Mr. and Miss?
    No. I'm referring to adults. I thought that was implied.

  14. #94

    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Location
    with the traditionless
    Posts
    5,630
    vCash
    500
    Rep Power
    8583
    Quote Originally Posted by mikemba View Post
    However, as long as the tradition of calling people with doctorates "Dr." continues, I don't think anyone should decide that some people who have earned the title "Dr." should get it (e.g. MDs), while other people who have also earned it (e.g. PhDs) should be considered undeserving of their titles.
    That reminds me of the time I referred to a medical doctor by her full name without the use of Dr. I was in a room with a GP and two nurses, and I said “my surgeon was ‘Mary Smith’ ”. Ha, there was stunned silence for 30 seconds that I dared to be so obstinate. Medical doctors could do with a bit of getting over themselves on that topic.
    What would Jenny do?

  15. #95

    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Posts
    3,205
    vCash
    400
    Rep Power
    33741
    Quote Originally Posted by snoopy View Post
    That reminds me of the time I referred to a medical doctor by her full name without the use of Dr. I was in a room with a GP and two nurses, and I said “my surgeon was ‘Mary Smith’ ”. Ha, there was stunned silence for 30 seconds that I dared to be so obstinate. Medical doctors could do with a bit of getting over themselves on that topic.
    I thought there was some medical dick swinging about becoming so qualified that go beyond Dr and become a Mr./Ms. again. I know here in the UK, I've been corrected calling a consultant or surgeon Dr. and been emphatically told Mr. X in response to a question I asked about Dr. X.

  16. #96
    Bountifully Enmeshed
    Join Date
    Apr 2001
    Location
    At the Christmas Bizarre
    Posts
    38,171
    vCash
    250
    Rep Power
    47117
    Quote Originally Posted by antmanb View Post
    I thought there was some medical dick swinging about becoming so qualified that go beyond Dr and become a Mr./Ms. again. I know here in the UK, I've been corrected calling a consultant or surgeon Dr. and been emphatically told Mr. X in response to a question I asked about Dr. X.
    That used to confuse the heck out of me when I read British novels; someone would go off to see Mr. XYZ, famous medical consultant on Harley Street, and I would think, "What kind of top medical consultant isn't a doctor?"

    It wasn't as bad as the whole solicitor/barrister confusion, but still. We just have doctors and lawyers.
    "The secret to creativity is knowing how to hide your sources."-- Albert Einstein.

  17. #97
    I <3 Kozuka
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Vancouver/Seattle
    Posts
    19,219
    vCash
    730
    Rep Power
    44756
    Quote Originally Posted by manhn View Post
    So, elementary teachers should refer to their students as Mr. and Miss?
    I had a professor in college who insisted we call him by his first name, but addressed us as Mr. or Miss [Lastname] in class.
    "The team doesn't get automatic capacity because management is mad" -- Greg Smith, agile guy

  18. #98

    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Location
    with the traditionless
    Posts
    5,630
    vCash
    500
    Rep Power
    8583
    Quote Originally Posted by antmanb View Post
    I thought there was some medical dick swinging about becoming so qualified that go beyond Dr and become a Mr./Ms. again. I know here in the UK, I've been corrected calling a consultant or surgeon Dr. and been emphatically told Mr. X in response to a question I asked about Dr. X.
    I may be contradicting myself but, after having a medical condition, I recognize that not all (medical) doctors are created equal. An office doctor is “applied medicine” versus a medical researcher or possibly a medical consultant - who is “theoretical medicine”. The applied medicine docs are just doing what the theoretical docs tell them to. Any serious moving forward of our medical understanding is done by the researchers, not the office doctors. So I have some sympathy with the “more qualified” viewpoint. But really, to me, all that means is titles only tell you so much about a person's abilities.
    What would Jenny do?

  19. #99
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Iowa
    Posts
    11,026
    vCash
    500
    Rep Power
    0
    I always like when you see Dr. Lastname, PhD.

    It seems redundant, until you realize the Dr. title is acquired through MD, and the PhD is additional. They want that PhD on it, so that other Drs know they are "better".

  20. #100
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Apr 2001
    Location
    Rejecting your reality and substituting my own
    Age
    30
    Posts
    11,006
    vCash
    500
    Rep Power
    0
    I have a friend who earned her PhD last week, and will be going to medical school in the fall. So she gets her "Dr." status early, and we joked we'd call her "Double D" once she got her MD.

Page 5 of 12 FirstFirst ... 34567 ... LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •