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  1. #1

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    Edea Ice Fly break down time?

    Hi Everyone-
    I have a question to those skating in the Edea Ice Fly boots. My daughter recently changed from custom Harlicks to Edea for the lighter weight. She loves them but after only two months the memory foam seems to be compacting already. She has a narrow foot and she is starting to slip around in them as the foam compacts more and more. She only weighs 70 lbs and is working on double axel/ first triple. Do those of you that have narrow feet see this happening? We have heated them and molded the heal in more but she is still slipping around Some girls at our rink say they buy new ones every 6 months? Thinking of going back to Harlick if they come out with a true light weight boot, not just a carbon fiber sole on the current leather boot. Thanks for any information! We just don't want to buy new boots every 6 months if she will always be fighting to get them to fit correctly for any amount of time:/

  2. #2

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    My skater kid has the next level down from the Ice Fly. She's about 112 lbs (I think? Definitely more than 70 lbs) and does 2A, 3S, 3T, skates 15-19 hours a week. Smallish foot. She got 12 months out of first pair, 18 months out of second pair. Only problem we had was tongue pulled out of second pair, but that was more her fault for not completely untying skates. When she gets a new pair, they are really, really tight--like a cast. It takes about 3-4 weeks for her foot to mold. Maybe your daughter's skates were a bit too big to begin with? I know some kids at our rink with very particular foot issues who can't use Edeas. 2 pair a year isn't unheard of for kids who skate a lot or are bigger.

  3. #3
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    Ice Fly is rated for quads. It sounds like she was not fitted properly or is tying them wrong, which caused them to break down.

  4. #4

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    Hmmm......things to think about! Thanks for the input The boots have been fitted twice by two different shops that deal with Edea a lot. Both have said they fit properly. She is tying them correctly per the method Edea recommends. She does have an extremely narrow heal and that is why she has always had the custom boots. Maybe her foot is just better suited to Harlick. Both skate shops we have seen said they believe the problem is the memory foam is compacting extremely fast. She skates about 20-23 hours per week and has been in the boots 2.5 months and they were perfect until this last week. Thanks again for the ideas!

  5. #5

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    I would be EXTREMELY surprised if a teenage girl working on a double Axel had already broken down a boot that is designed for quads and worn by skaters like Ilia Kulik and Max Aaron...

    Did you leave them in the sun or is there any way they could have been damaged?

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    Edea skates are the latest craze, probably because they are silver and sparkly--perfect for appealing to the pre-teen and teen set. It's brilliant marketing by Edea, that's for sure. Sadly, they are way, WAY too stiff for developing skaters. And despite claims to heat molding and all that other stuff that says they will give you a "custom fit," this really isn't the case. The last itself is probably not correct for your daughter. Not every skate brand is for every skater. It seems like going back to Harlick is the better idea. And if she wants silver and sparkly, I'm sure Harlick could add some silvery details to make her look trendy.

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    I should add that skate shops are keen to sell Edea because the markup is so much greater for them. The shops make more money on Edea skates than they do on Harlick, hence the emphasis. Same with Jackson. The markup is huge. Shops have greater financial incentive to sell skates mass-produced skates like Edea and Jackson than they do on handmade skates like Harlick, SPTeri, and Klingbeil (even though Klingbeil is sort of in limbo, but you get the idea) so of course they are going to tell you that Edea is better. Yeah--better for THEM but not necessarily better for YOU.

  8. #8

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    deleted
    Last edited by Willowway; 07-20-2014 at 02:31 AM.

  9. #9

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    A skate shop that pushes a brand of skate because it has a higher markup on that brand - not because it's the right skate for the skater - is not a skate shop that I would go to. Unless I had no other choice.
    You should never write words with numbers. Unless you're seven. Or your name is Prince. - "Weird Al" Yankovic, "Word Crimes"

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    Quote Originally Posted by overedge View Post
    A skate shop that pushes a brand of skate because it has a higher markup on that brand - not because it's the right skate for the skater - is not a skate shop that I would go to. Unless I had no other choice.
    Of course the shops will not tell you what the markup is. I had a conversation with Don Klingbeil before he sold the operation (I think I have one of the last pairs of Klingbeils made in Queens) where he gave me a LOT of this information where he explained the state of the skating boot industry to me and why he found it impossible to compete. He had a superior product at a competitive price yet all things considered, shops would favor the mass-produced boots because of the higher markup. The cost to the consumer would be in the same ballpark but the margin for the shopowner was completely different. A shop owner that I'm friendly with confirmed what he said. Some won't even sell Harlick or SPTeri any more. They will only sell the mass-produced stuff because it's easier and brings a higher margin. It's much easier to put a plastic skate in an oven and call it a "custom fit" when the plastic melts than it is to measure a foot properly for a true custom boot. To be fair, many skaters do perfectly well with the mass-produced boots. Look at Gracie Gold. Edea skates have worked well for her. But like any footwear, they are not going to work for everyone.

  11. #11

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    Did you read my post? I wasn't commenting on what the different markups were, or whether buyers were aware of them. I was pointing out that a skate shop that tries to get consumers to buy something simply because of the markup is not serving its customers well, and that I would not shop there if I had a choice.
    You should never write words with numbers. Unless you're seven. Or your name is Prince. - "Weird Al" Yankovic, "Word Crimes"

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    Quote Originally Posted by overedge View Post
    Did you read my post? I wasn't commenting on what the different markups were, or whether buyers were aware of them. I was pointing out that a skate shop that tries to get consumers to buy something simply because of the markup is not serving its customers well, and that I would not shop there if I had a choice.
    Yes, I did. And many shops--like many other businesses--are simply concerned about the bottom line. And why wouldn't they be? Of course shops are going to push the stuff with the higher markup. No one is in business for a public service. Not even skate shops.

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    A skate shop serves a relatively small and specialized market. And it's a competitive market in which word of mouth and reputation can travel very fast. If a skate shop is pushing goods on the basis of its own profit and not what's suitable for the customer, word is going to get around, and customers will go elsewhere if they have an alternative. Selling goods strictly on the basis of markup is a foolish short sighted strategy.

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