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  1. #661
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    Okaaaaaay. Stephen King HAS TO have read Ken Follett' s website about how to write a best seller because all of a sudden we have a sexy sex scene approximately 1/3ish through the book, RIGHT WHERE Ken said to place it.

    I dunno whether to laugh cry or applaud.
    Have a nice day!

  2. #662

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    Have to say for any J.K. Rowlings fans out there - that I am currently listening to her new book - penned under the name of Robert Galbraith - entitled "Silkworm" - and I am loving it. It definitely has it's share of gore and hideous imagery, not unlike some of the later Harry Potter books, but she really brings her characters alive and makes you care about them, as well as treating you to an enjoyable, suspenseful, and engrossing whodunit. As I think of most of the mystery/detective books I have read, they tend to portray police/detectives as either - A. flawed and damaged but smart and dedicated or - B. stupid, mean spirited and bigoted - and this is no exception. The main characters in this book are a carry over from her first book "Cuckoo Calling" and we learn more about them - including their pasts - but I understand this is to be a 7 book series - and she does leave some questions for her to revisit in later books. Not all books are great when read on Audible - but this narrator is just excellent. I can't claim to know English dialects but he makes the characters quite distinguishable from one another and does a bang up job of women's voices.
    pug lover

  3. #663

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    Finished "Silkworm" last night and I feel slightly depressed that it is over and I don't have it to look forward to at the end of the day.
    pug lover

  4. #664
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    I stayed up super late reading it last night and am about to continue. Love it. I think it's better than Cuckoo's Calling so far.

  5. #665
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    Well, I never thought I'd say these words: I thoroughly enjoyed a book that was written entirely in 2nd person.

    How to Get Filthy Rich in Rising Asia, by Mohsin Hamid (who wrote The Reluctant Fundamentalist among others) is a novel disguised as a self-help book -- hence the second person. It's a tad gimmicky, but I knew that going in so I was okay with it. And the gimmick worked. It's not thought-provoking or insightful in any way, although there are some observations about urban living in an un-named "rising Asia" city that's probably based on Lahore or Islamabad. Hamid manages to develop his characters -- also un-named -- with prose that is both efficient and elegant. The story is both universal and specific to the particular time and place in which it is told.

  6. #666
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    So the library had only the large print copy of marisha pessl first novel and I'm going to read it because I do like the way she writes even tho so far I don't care for the subject matter but my god it's a strain on the arms to hold it far enough away to focus!!! This is perhaps the *only* time I'll concede that an e-reader might indeed be a useful piece of equipment.
    Have a nice day!

  7. #667

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    My Kindle Fire HD has died so I am thankful for the last trip to B&N netted me a stack of paper books to feed my booklust. Paper books work without charging. I do miss playing Candy Crush on the Kindle screen, though; it's easier than on my phone.

    As for what I'm reading, as opposed to how, I'm jumping time periods like a grasshopper on speed. I finished the furturistic teen "Selection" series, jumped back to Colonial New England for Steven Lewis' "The Blind in Darkness" and am now in medieval Ireland in Cora Harrison's "My Lady Judge," which is a pretty interesting start to a series of mysteries in a remote Western kingdom just beginning to feel the threat of English domination from Henry VIII. The Irish code of law is fascinating and the main character being an older independent woman running a law school while fending off the advances of her liege lord is definitely unusual and I'm glad I was able to get a couple of the next volumes on the swap site.
    I'd rather be thought of as absolutely ridiculous than as absolutely boring.

  8. #668
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    I'm about 1/3 of the way through The Humans by Matt Haig, and loving it so far. I'm pretty sure it was someone here who recommended it, so thank you!

  9. #669
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    Quote Originally Posted by michiruwater View Post
    I stayed up super late reading it last night and am about to continue. Love it. I think it's better than Cuckoo's Calling so far.
    Hmmmm. I wasn't thrilled with Cuckoo's Calling, I wonder if this one is worth a try.

    I am finished with most of my vacation reading.

    Nicholas and Alexandra by Robert Massie was excellent and heartbreaking.

    I really didn't like The Family Tree by Carole Cadwalladr, way too contrived and self-conscious. Full of cliches and quite a bit of racism, namely the objectification of the Black male (exotic odors, tropical and animal appeal, really?)
    "Nature is a damp, inconvenient sort of place where birds and animals wander about uncooked."

    from Speedy Death

  10. #670
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    She still has a lot of cutesy descriptions and is sometimes overly verbose with them, but it's less jarring than it was in Cuckoo's Calling, which I nonetheless loved. This feels like she's settled a lot more comfortably into it all, and the mystery at the core of the novel is a lot more intriguing. In the previous one it was a lot of celebrities and stuff - the dead woman was a model - but everything about this murder is more grotesque and I'm 68% in and have not the slightest clue who might have done it.

  11. #671

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    Quote Originally Posted by IceAlisa View Post
    Nicholas and Alexandra by Robert Massie was excellent and heartbreaking.
    I agree on both counts. If you liked that one, you may also want to read The Romanovs: The Final Chapter by the same author, which was written after the bones were discovered.

    I felt like I did a lot of reading on my vacation, but most of it was my Rick Steves travel books and a couple re-reads (The Lost Crown and Victoria's Daughters, the former because I was in Russia and the latter because of the eldest daughter's marriage into the Prussian royal family). The only new book I read was The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks for one of my book clubs, which sounded like it was going to be a fiction novel, but turned out to be even stranger than fiction! Very interesting and well-written, if a bit confusing for a science neophyte like me.

  12. #672
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    Quote Originally Posted by Artemis@BC View Post
    Well, I never thought I'd say these words: I thoroughly enjoyed a book that was written entirely in 2nd person.

    How to Get Filthy Rich in Rising Asia, by Mohsin Hamid (who wrote The Reluctant Fundamentalist among others) is a novel disguised as a self-help book -- hence the second person. It's a tad gimmicky, but I knew that going in so I was okay with it. And the gimmick worked. It's not thought-provoking or insightful in any way, although there are some observations about urban living in an un-named "rising Asia" city that's probably based on Lahore or Islamabad. Hamid manages to develop his characters -- also un-named -- with prose that is both efficient and elegant. The story is both universal and specific to the particular time and place in which it is told.
    I really liked The Reluctant Fundamentalist (also written in second person and gimmicky, with some really heavy-handed elements, but I still really enjoyed it) so I got this one. Thanks!

    Quote Originally Posted by IceAlisa View Post
    I really didn't like The Family Tree by Carole Cadwalladr, way too contrived and self-conscious. Full of cliches and quite a bit of racism, namely the objectification of the Black male (exotic odors, tropical and animal appeal, really?)
    Sorry about that.
    "The secret to creativity is knowing how to hide your sources."-- Albert Einstein.

  13. #673

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    Quote Originally Posted by immoimeme View Post
    The Kite Runner is faaaaaaantastic. I couldn't put it down at ALL. I had to know what happened next THAT'S a good book!!
    It was good. I like a thousand splendid suns a bit better tho. Both are good reads.

    Quote Originally Posted by Zemgirl View Post
    The Stephanie Plum books were fun at first, but they are so repetitive that I gave up after 7 or 8. I also think that Stephanie needed a career change at least 10 years ago, nobody can stay that inept for that long. Wouldn't it have been fun if Evanovich had made her a crime reporter or something like that?

    As for Morelli/Ranger, I can't believe that's still being dragged out.
    Count me as another one who quit about book 12 or 13.

    I'm reading Kathy Reich's latest one. I dunno.......it's lost its spark.

    Louise Penny otoh, is still capturing my attention and I look forward to her new one coming out the end of August - The Long Way Home.
    Gone crazy. Be back soon.

  14. #674
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    Quote Originally Posted by Prancer View Post



    Sorry about that.
    Don't be! It sounded good to me too.
    "Nature is a damp, inconvenient sort of place where birds and animals wander about uncooked."

    from Speedy Death

  15. #675
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    Quote Originally Posted by michiruwater View Post
    She still has a lot of cutesy descriptions and is sometimes overly verbose with them, but it's less jarring than it was in Cuckoo's Calling, which I nonetheless loved. This feels like she's settled a lot more comfortably into it all, and the mystery at the core of the novel is a lot more intriguing. In the previous one it was a lot of celebrities and stuff - the dead woman was a model - but everything about this murder is more grotesque and I'm 68% in and have not the slightest clue who might have done it.
    Thanks, will keep in mind.
    Quote Originally Posted by Erin View Post
    I agree on both counts. If you liked that one, you may also want to read The Romanovs: The Final Chapter by the same author, which was written after the bones were discovered.

    I felt like I did a lot of reading on my vacation, but most of it was my Rick Steves travel books and a couple re-reads (The Lost Crown and Victoria's Daughters, the former because I was in Russia and the latter because of the eldest daughter's marriage into the Prussian royal family). The only new book I read was The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks for one of my book clubs, which sounded like it was going to be a fiction novel, but turned out to be even stranger than fiction! Very interesting and well-written, if a bit confusing for a science neophyte like me.
    Nicholas and Alexandra was really stressful for me to read for some reason. On one hand, I had sympathy for the anguished mother who couldn't help her son and on the other, did she have to stick her incompetent nose into everything? (and pushed that part of the world into a death spiral as she did so?) I have The Final Days but will have to take a break--too tragic to read back to back. On a shallow note, Nicholas was a good looking guy, have never noticed before.

    Victoria's Daughters was a great read. Makes you grateful for vaccinations, doesn't it?

    I've meant to read Henrietta Lacks for years and somehow hasn't gotten around to it. Recommended to my gyn though.
    Last edited by IceAlisa; 07-04-2014 at 08:56 AM.
    "Nature is a damp, inconvenient sort of place where birds and animals wander about uncooked."

    from Speedy Death

  16. #676

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    Quote Originally Posted by michiruwater View Post
    She still has a lot of cutesy descriptions and is sometimes overly verbose with them, but it's less jarring than it was in Cuckoo's Calling, which I nonetheless loved. This feels like she's settled a lot more comfortably into it all, and the mystery at the core of the novel is a lot more intriguing. In the previous one it was a lot of celebrities and stuff - the dead woman was a model - but everything about this murder is more grotesque and I'm 68% in and have not the slightest clue who might have done it.
    This is a very good description - the one thing that I think would be a question to ask yourself before purchasing this book is - Did you find the main characters of Cuckoo's Calling interesting or appealing? I agree this is a much better story - about something I would think the author knows a lot about - the writing and publishing world. However, she is a writer that devotes a lot of pages to developing her characters, what they think and feel (even to how they mentally dissect conversations), and if Corcoran and Robin don't hold your interest - that could be a problem. Although, they are a lot more fleshed out and real then what we knew of them in her first book.
    pug lover

  17. #677
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    I finished it. The ending was significantly more satisfying in Silkworm than in Cuckoo's Calling. I thought everything wrapped up quite nicely and made sense. I stayed up way too late last night to finish it, though But it was worth it!

  18. #678

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    Spoiler review:

    Yesterday I took a break from Olivia Moaning to read Slammerkin. I had mixed feelings about this one. On the one hand, I give Donoghue credit for doing a pretty good job of recreating 18th century England. I especially liked the conceit of a character who named her children after protagonists in the novels of Eliza Haywood, Charlottes Lennox and Smith, and Samuel Richardson. On the other hand, it's a gritty story. An ugly story. The main character isn’t particularly likeable, but she is redeemed in the end by her refusal to place the blame for her ultimate crime on someone else, even though the opportunity to do so is essentially handed to her on a silver salver. Hard, selfish, opportunistic, deceitful though she is throughout most of the novel, she does have an inner core of decency which prevents her from destroying another innocent life.
    My job requires me to be a juggler, but that does not mean that I enjoy working with clowns.

  19. #679

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    Quote Originally Posted by Prancer View Post
    I really liked The Reluctant Fundamentalist (also written in second person and gimmicky, with some really heavy-handed elements, but I still really enjoyed it) so I got this one. Thanks!
    Quote Originally Posted by immoimeme View Post
    The Kite Runner is faaaaaaantastic. I couldn't put it down at ALL. I had to know what happened next THAT'S a good book!!
    I bought both of those books a while back from a thrift store and they've been sitting on my bookshelf ever since. The Reluctant Fundamentalist always grabs my attention when I walk past it but then I forget about it. I should read it sometime. I'm currently reading another book that I bought from the same thrift store, 1984. That also sat on my bookshelf for a very long time. I'm enjoying it but I only get a chance to read it in little chunks. Hence, it's taking me a while to finish.
    "If people are looking for guarantees, they should buy appliances at Sears and stay away from human relationships."~Prancer

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    1984 was one of the seminal books of my teenage years. I was about 13-years-old when I read it. I finished it when I was alone in the house. Because I was so young, I couldn't believe the ending and cried for hours. I remember being bewildered and angry.

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