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  1. #541
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    Cool! When I was reading the books I thought they'd make for a good screen adaptation -- and TV is better than movie(s) here methinks.

    I think it would work well to mix up the storylines from the three books too, rather than try to keep them compartmentalized in a "trilogy."

  2. #542
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    Finished reading The Hope by Herman Wouk. Not nearly as powerful as Winds of War and War and Remembrance - or The Caine Mutiny for that matter, but still enjoyable. The Hope is historical fiction about the state of Israel. It starts in 1948 at the point where Leon Uris' Exodus ends; with the birth of Israel. It then follows the history through the 6-day war. I see The Glory goes beyond the 6-day war to set up present day history - so maybe I will get to the sequel at some point.

    I also read a Michael Innes mystery, The Ampersand Papers. I haven't read Michael Innes before - always mixing him up with Hammond Innes. I enjoyed this very english mystery for light (but not necessarily easy) reading.
    Last edited by A.H.Black; 06-06-2014 at 02:26 AM.

  3. #543
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    Prancer will appreciate this. There is a new mystery anthology (Faceoff) that pairs two different writer's characters. David Baldacci is the editor and gives a little background about the two authors before each story. Lee Child's Jack Reacher is paired with Joseph Finder's Nick Heller in a story titled Good and Valuable Consideration. Finder is apparently a meticulous plotter and outliner while Child never knows where his story is going to go. Which totally explains why suddenly Reacher is doing things that have you going WTF? The two writing together was done by email with Finder constantly pestering Child about where his part of the story was going to go next. Child never knew until he got there.

    I only got this yesterday and have only read one other story which paired R L Stine with Linc Child and Doug Preston. Needless to say it was the weirdest Pendergast story I've ever read.
    Those who never succeed themselves are always the first to tell you how.

  4. #544
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    "Night film" was (italics) interesting (italics) but the ending was not unexpected. I guess you could read it once. I don't feel it's re-readable. I do feel the author did a nice job of weaving together somewhat disparate internet memes to produce a coherent fictionalized whole.
    Have a nice day!

  5. #545

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    I just picked up "The Mapmaker's War" by Ronlyn Domingue, read the first two pages, flipped through the rest of the book, and posted it to the swap site. It's written in second-person present tense, with wierd punctuation and the strangest grammatical format I've even seen. The blurb on the back cover sounded interesting but not enough to make me struggle through that prose, no matter how beautiful and lyrical it's supposed to be. Nope, gonzo. There's a wait-list for it on the swap site so hopefully somebody else will be able to enjoy it.
    I'd rather be thought of as absolutely ridiculous than as absolutely boring.

  6. #546
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    I have a hard time with novels written entirely present tense at all- it just seems so wrong and unnatural. Let alone 2nd person present tense. Yuk.

    I couldn't read "Wolf Hall" and sequels or "The Orenda" for that reason, although I probably would have otherwise enjoyed them.



    Quote Originally Posted by zaphyre14 View Post
    I just picked up "The Mapmaker's War" by Ronlyn Domingue, read the first two pages, flipped through the rest of the book, and posted it to the swap site. It's written in second-person present tense, with wierd punctuation and the strangest grammatical format I've even seen. The blurb on the back cover sounded interesting but not enough to make me struggle through that prose, no matter how beautiful and lyrical it's supposed to be. Nope, gonzo. There's a wait-list for it on the swap site so hopefully somebody else will be able to enjoy it.
    I know. But I do not approve. And I am not resigned.
    (Edna St Vincent Millay)

  7. #547
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    Quote Originally Posted by LilJen View Post
    Yay for old awesome Mercer Mayer. not the new 'little critter' dreck.
    Some only remember him for the Little Critter books, but Mercer Mayer is a fine artist & did beautiful illustrations for many of the classic tales. I have several first editions - East of the Sun & West of the Moon is my favorite.

  8. #548
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    Quote Originally Posted by rfisher View Post
    Prancer will appreciate this. There is a new mystery anthology (Faceoff) that pairs two different writer's characters. David Baldacci is the editor and gives a little background about the two authors before each story. Lee Child's Jack Reacher is paired with Joseph Finder's Nick Heller in a story titled Good and Valuable Consideration. Finder is apparently a meticulous plotter and outliner while Child never knows where his story is going to go. Which totally explains why suddenly Reacher is doing things that have you going WTF? The two writing together was done by email with Finder constantly pestering Child about where his part of the story was going to go next. Child never knew until he got there.
    They should try to match writers with similar styles. I can see a lot of potential for bloodshed in this scenario.

    Quote Originally Posted by zaphyre14 View Post
    I just picked up "The Mapmaker's War" by Ronlyn Domingue, read the first two pages, flipped through the rest of the book, and posted it to the swap site. It's written in second-person present tense, with wierd punctuation and the strangest grammatical format I've even seen. The blurb on the back cover sounded interesting but not enough to make me struggle through that prose, no matter how beautiful and lyrical it's supposed to be. Nope, gonzo. There's a wait-list for it on the swap site so hopefully somebody else will be able to enjoy it.
    Isn't it funny how distracting and irritating things like that can be? Weird punctuation and nonstandard spacing do that for me. But tense weirdness doesn't really bother me at all.
    "The secret to creativity is knowing how to hide your sources."-- Albert Einstein.

  9. #549
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    Quote Originally Posted by Prancer View Post
    They should try to match writers with similar styles. I can see a lot of potential for bloodshed in this scenario.
    .
    It was actually pretty good, albeit, there was a rather brutal take down of the bad guy. It was also funny. I think Child should have Finder oversee his writing more often. I think the writers must have liked putting very different characters together.
    Those who never succeed themselves are always the first to tell you how.

  10. #550

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    Today I received Conclusion of the Memoirs of Miss Sidney Bidulph (1767) by Frances Sheridan, novelist, playwright, and mother of Richard Brinsley. (Little known fact: in need of ideas for The School for Scandal, Richard "borrowed" from his mother's work.) Anyway, I read Memoirs of Miss Sidney Bidulph about 20 years ago, loved it, and was so frustrated that the sequel was just not to be had. And now I can finally read it. According to the blurb on the back, it's a forerunner of Les Liaisons Dangeureuses (1782); Sheridan's works were translated into French, which has me wondering if M. de Laclos did some "borrowing" himself.
    My job requires me to be a juggler, but that does not mean that I enjoy working with clowns.

  11. #551

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    Quote Originally Posted by Wyliefan View Post
    I know my dad liked it (retired Army guy, loves military history). I haven't read it myself, though.
    It is a classic; and wonderful, IMO.
    Mr. Sharra lived nearby; so, the book got lots of press when it was written'released.

  12. #552

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    In killing time befor today's Big Release, I read Yet Another "Hunger Games" Inspired Teen novel "The Selection" by Kiera Cass (and if that isn't a pen name, I'll wear a tiara to work!) and surprisngly enjoyed it enough to consider picking up Vol. 2 when I'm at B&N this afternoon. There's the typical lover's triangle; Poor but Beautiful Juliet leaves her secret Even Poorer Romeo for a chance to snag The Handsome Prince who's conducting a nationwide search for his bride in a televised version of The Bachelor. Our Juliet/Cinderella goes into the competition with only the hope of earning money and status to help her starving family but ends up more attracted to the Prince than she planned on. The alternate history presented is pretty interesting, although only briefly explained as part of a history lesson for the Selected girls and the caste system of the society seems pretty well defined.

    With still a few hours to go, I'm alo reading an older Antoinette Stockinberg paranormal "Embers" on my Kindle, set in Bar Harbor, Maine. The mystery revolves around a fantastic dollhouse that may hold the clue to solving a 50-year-old murder and bringing justice and rest to the the ghostly victim. I thought I had read all of Stockinberg's books when they first came out but I don't remember this one. And it reads fast.
    I'd rather be thought of as absolutely ridiculous than as absolutely boring.

  13. #553
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    Quote Originally Posted by zaphyre14 View Post
    In killing time befor today's Big Release, I read Yet Another "Hunger Games" Inspired Teen novel "The Selection" by Kiera Cass (and if that isn't a pen name, I'll wear a tiara to work!) and surprisngly enjoyed it enough to consider picking up Vol. 2 when I'm at B&N this afternoon. There's the typical lover's triangle; Poor but Beautiful Juliet leaves her secret Even Poorer Romeo for a chance to snag The Handsome Prince who's conducting a nationwide search for his bride in a televised version of The Bachelor. Our Juliet/Cinderella goes into the competition with only the hope of earning money and status to help her starving family but ends up more attracted to the Prince than she planned on. The alternate history presented is pretty interesting, although only briefly explained as part of a history lesson for the Selected girls and the caste system of the society seems pretty well defined.
    This one sounds like it was also inspired by The Princess Academy. http://www.amazon.com/Princess-Acade...2412809&sr=1-3

  14. #554

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    I rushed off to B&N after work yesterday and came home with my prize: Diana Gabaldon's "Written in My Own Heart's Blood" and several others that look interesting. Along with the Kiera Cass sequel "The Elite", and Cassandra Clare's "The City of Heavenly Fire", I picked up Jo Beverly's "A Shocking Delight" and Sam Thomas' "The Midwife's Tale: A Mystery." I'm thrilled with my purchases and can't wait to curl up and read, read, read! This working-for-a-living gig is getting in the way!
    I'd rather be thought of as absolutely ridiculous than as absolutely boring.

  15. #555

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    Quote Originally Posted by zaphyre14 View Post
    I rushed off to B&N after work yesterday and came home with my prize: Diana Gabaldon's "Written in My Own Heart's Blood" and several others that look interesting. Along with the Kiera Cass sequel "The Elite", and Cassandra Clare's "The City of Heavenly Fire", I picked up Jo Beverly's "A Shocking Delight" and Sam Thomas' "The Midwife's Tale: A Mystery." I'm thrilled with my purchases and can't wait to curl up and read, read, read! This working-for-a-living gig is getting in the way!
    I have MOBY on my Kindle and started it last night. My friend asked me if I'd finished it yet; I told her that I read pretty quickly, but not fast enough to finish a 1000+ page book on a work day

    Before that I read Naomi Novik's His Majesty's Dragon, which I really liked.

  16. #556
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    Hmmm.....I can't decide whether to order MOBY or not. I didn't finish the last one and just skipped to the end half-way through the book. Maybe I'll just wait for someone to tell me if they all die and she wraps up the series.
    Those who never succeed themselves are always the first to tell you how.

  17. #557

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    I read the new novel by Stephen King - Mr. Mercedes - over the weekend. It is not in the horror, supernatural genre but a murder/detective novel. There is no mystery or whodunit as you know from the outset who the guilty party is. King is a good wordsmith and some of the characters are really interesting but I really didn't like the book. Not too sure why - I do agree that the true monsters live among us and are not figments of our imagination - but scarier. This "monster" starts out interesting but somehow the whole thing seems drawn out and loses steam - at least for me.
    pug lover

  18. #558

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    Quote Originally Posted by rfisher View Post
    Hmmm.....I can't decide whether to order MOBY or not. I didn't finish the last one and just skipped to the end half-way through the book. Maybe I'll just wait for someone to tell me if they all die and she wraps up the series.
    It's Gabaldon, not George R.R. Martin People may be tortured or sexually assaulted, but she usually leaves them alive.

    Jamie will obviously be dead by the end, because he can't time-travel and she's confirmed that the ghost in the 1940s scenes from book 1 is him.

  19. #559
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    Prancey, found this one in the El Cheapo bin and it has your name all over it.
    The fastest thing out of New Jersey since Tricky Nicky in a Muscovian handbasket

  20. #560
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    Quote Originally Posted by Zemgirl View Post
    It's Gabaldon, not George R.R. Martin People may be tortured or sexually assaulted, but she usually leaves them alive.

    Jamie will obviously be dead by the end, because he can't time-travel and she's confirmed that the ghost in the 1940s scenes from book 1 is him.
    Most of my apathy comes because I despise Breanna (Roger is OK), have never cared for Lord John (I read one of his books and haven't bothered with the others), and don't particularly care for any of the other ancillary characters. I liked book 1 (it was different and the twist of Claire not being the virgin was good), didn't like 2 (I hate when authors have fictional characters interact with real historical figures--I mean the whole scene with the King of France was just stupid), liked Book 3 once Clarie got back to Scotland (I found Jamie's story in England to be boring), didn't like 4 and 5 because I think her "brilliant" idea of writing in vingettes made for a disjointed narrative. I know she thinks it's brilliant, but I didn't like it at all, plus she ran out of story. I lost interest in 6 about 1/3 of the way into the book when she started changing POV and person with the writing. She'd never have gotten away with that if it was her first book. You have to be really, really good to do that, and she's not that good. The original story was never intended to go as far as it did and has done so because of $$$$$. Gabaldon is like Evanovich. She started out with a great premise, gained a large following and the writing has deteriorated. Evanovich's has because her daughter is writing the books now I don't know what Gabaldon's issue is apart from the fact she has a superinflated ego and thinks she's a better writer than she actually is. IMHO.
    Those who never succeed themselves are always the first to tell you how.

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