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  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jenny View Post
    I hope kids today have access to programs like this.
    Scholastic is still around and is pretty much exactly the same as it was when I was a kid--same brochures, same look. In addition to the classroom orders, Scholastic sponsors a book fair at the elementary school here every year that's open to the public, not just to the kids at the school, and sometimes you can find some paperbacks from way back when you were a kid on sale to a whole new generation . I still go most years and buy books for the classrooms of some of my kids' former teachers.

    There are a couple of other programs out there--the names escape me at the moment--that are similar to Scholastic; somewhat different selections and things, but same basic idea.
    "The secret to creativity is knowing how to hide your sources."-- Albert Einstein.

  2. #22
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    The only problem I have with Scholastic (both the brochures and the book fair) is there is a lot more emphasis on a toy or knick-knack sold with the book. It used to be rare for a book to come with a 'thing' and now it seems many do: which a lot of parents complain is a waste of money.

    (I know the book fair- one parent was furious because they sent in money and all the kid bought was 'stuff'. Not a thing to read. Since kids shop during school hours without supervision of their purchases. The parent was not told that non-books were sold.)

  3. #23

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    Quote Originally Posted by Skittl1321 View Post
    (I know the book fair- one parent was furious because they sent in money and all the kid bought was 'stuff'. Not a thing to read. Since kids shop during school hours without supervision of their purchases. The parent was not told that non-books were sold.)
    Yeah, there is a lot of junk sold at the book fair (in addition to lots of books). So you've got to be pretty specific when giving instructions to the kids. My kids know that they can buy the junk, but it'll come out of their allowance. Book purchases, OTOH, don't.

    But, my daughter has a Nook now and she loves browsing for books on it.
    Creating drama!

  4. #24
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    I still haven't forgiven Scholastic for forcing JK Rowling to change the name from Philosopher's Stone to Sorcerer's Stone.

    I'm only partly joking here. The "might have beens" if the book hadn't been published at all in the US are impossible to predict. But while I applaud anything that gets books into the hands of kids, the Sorcerer's Stone incident to me is an indicator of the "lowest common denominator" mentality that Scholastic seems to have. That they had no faith in young American readers' ability to understand -- or be enticed by -- the book without the name change. (Not to mention that the "philosopher's stone" has a history of its own completely outside the world of Harry Potter ...)

  5. #25

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    I just ordered The Humans. Thanks for the recommendation! This thread seems to be where I go most often for new book ideas, so this is really a "thanks" to everyone.

  6. #26
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    I help Mini Ice with his reading and book report writing as he is a math/techie type like his daddy. I helped him through Sarah, Plain and Tall after which he asked for the sequels!

    I think the series are a lovely set of books for children where serious, real life problems are examined from a child's perspective with absolutely no sugar-coating. The Russian in me is thrilled! I mean in the old country in a required reading children's book a man deliberately drowns his dog.

    Right now we are working on a book report on Caleb's story. And Mini Ice has asked for the remaining sequels! I am so thrilled that he is interested in the reading and is really involved with the characters. Great job getting my kid to read, Patricia MacLachlan!
    "Nature is a damp, inconvenient sort of place where birds and animals wander about uncooked."

    from Speedy Death

  7. #27
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    Just got addicted to Peter Tremayne's Sister Fidelma mysteries. They're set in 600s Ireland. Also hooked on Michael Jecks's Sir Baldwin/Knights Templar mysteries (kind of deceptive series name-it's set after the Order was suppressed and Sir Baldwin's an ex-Templar, though it's variously relevant in some books) but the trick there is I don't think they sold much over here so I have to play Amazon used sellers to hunt down UK copies. (I really ought to be reading Bastiat's "The Law" and "Economic Harmonies" but the latter in particular is really daunting for light reading....)

  8. #28
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    A question for those who've read the Flavia de Luce series by Alan Bradley: would you recommend them to a 12-year-old girl who is a good reader? A friend asked me concerning her daughter. I have read them all and loved them. I described the series as best I could and I'm sure she'll read reviews, but I just wondered what some of you think.

  9. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by Grannyfan View Post
    A question for those who've read the Flavia de Luce series by Alan Bradley: would you recommend them to a 12-year-old girl who is a good reader? A friend asked me concerning her daughter. I have read them all and loved them. I described the series as best I could and I'm sure she'll read reviews, but I just wondered what some of you think.
    Hmm, good question! I think they'd probably work, for a mature 12-yr-old. They are murder mysteries of course, but I don't recall there being much graphic detail. And the language level isn't too high either. There are scenes of sisterly bullying, but there's probably not a single youth/YA book out there that doesn't have some bullying content.

    The most problematic parts might be the idiosyncrasies of time and place, they might somewhat of a challenge for a girl that age to comprehend. But that's one of the joys of reading, isn't it: exploring new worlds.

    (p.s. You know the newest book in the series is out this week, right? I wasn't quite quick enough to be at the front of the library queue, but I shouldn't have to wait too long.)

  10. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by Artemis@BC View Post
    Hmm, good question! I think they'd probably work, for a mature 12-yr-old. They are murder mysteries of course, but I don't recall there being much graphic detail. And the language level isn't too high either. There are scenes of sisterly bullying, but there's probably not a single youth/YA book out there that doesn't have some bullying content.

    The most problematic parts might be the idiosyncrasies of time and place, they might somewhat of a challenge for a girl that age to comprehend. But that's one of the joys of reading, isn't it: exploring new worlds.

    (p.s. You know the newest book in the series is out this week, right? I wasn't quite quick enough to be at the front of the library queue, but I shouldn't have to wait too long.)
    Thank you for your comments. Those are pretty much the same things I told the mother. And yes, I put the new book on my Kindle just last night. Haven't had a chance to read much yet, but I'm really looking forward to it. Flavia is one of my favorite characters.

  11. #31
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    I haven't read all the Flavia de Luce books, but the ones I have read would have been easy for me at twelve and probably more appropriate than a lot of the things I was reading around then.
    "The secret to creativity is knowing how to hide your sources."-- Albert Einstein.

  12. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by Prancer View Post
    I haven't read all the Flavia de Luce books, but the ones I have read would have been easy for me at twelve and probably more appropriate than a lot of the things I was reading around then.
    Ooh, do tell!

  13. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by Prancer View Post
    I don't know if most people are familiar with this, but if not:

    http://usa.imaginationlibrary.com/

    Dolly Parton has started a program that sends a child a book a month from birth to age five. The children must be living in a community that has registered for the program.

    Gotta get that addiction started early.
    Yay for Ms Parton!

    It's gotten harder and harder for me to buy Kindle books of late. :/ I fear this means there will be an amazon.se store soon, and that they won't be selling as many English titles. I really despise the idea that I can't find books in the original language because someone, somewhere bought the rights to the Swedish translation, which I have zero interest in reading if I can read the language the book was written in.

    Got about 5 pages left of Winter's Bone and then I think I'll continue with Ted Chiang's The Lifecycle of Software Objects.

  14. #34

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    I've been reading Louise Penny's newest - How the Light Gets in. I enjoyed the books I read before, but the Beautiful Mystery and this one have reeled me in. She's on my when she writes a new one I'll read it list.

    Gone Girl into a movie. It's been a while since I read the book, but it would be a tough movie to make unless they did it with narration - Morgan Freeman in Shawshank for instance.
    Gone crazy. Be back soon.

  15. #35
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    Pat - I LOVED those two books in the Gamache series. I actually read The Beautiful Mystery before any other books in the series. Then I started at the beginning and reread it later while waiting for the last book.

    I remember reading Valley of the Dolls when I was 10. Probably not kiddie lit?

  16. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by Artemis@BC View Post
    Ooh, do tell!
    I started reading adult books when I was about 12.

    Quote Originally Posted by dbell1 View Post
    I remember reading Valley of the Dolls when I was 10. Probably not kiddie lit?
    Yeah, like that. I even remember reading that one.

    I read some really filthy stuff between 12 and 18--like, stuff I would consider filthy even now.
    "The secret to creativity is knowing how to hide your sources."-- Albert Einstein.

  17. #37
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    Well back then I don't recall "young adult" books as a genre. It was more like when you outgrew say "the adventures of katie john" you read whatever was available, like "valley of the dolls" or mickey spillane or readers digest condensed books (awfully desperate) etc.

    I'm reading "black house" by Stephen king and peter straub. 8 pages in I think I can guess who wrote what.
    Have a nice day!

  18. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by immoimeme View Post
    Well back then I don't recall "young adult" books as a genre.
    I don't know if they were called Young Adult, but there were books for teenagers and I read some of those. They just weren't nearly as interesting .

    I definitely remember reading Reader's Digest Condensed Books . My grandma had a huge collection of them and that's what I read when we visited. If I started on a story that interested me, she always gave me the book, as neither she nor anyone else ever read them.

    I have some fond memories of Reader's Digest Condensed Books.
    "The secret to creativity is knowing how to hide your sources."-- Albert Einstein.

  19. #39
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    I'm finishing up The Devil Wears Prada. I bought a few years ago when Borders was going out of business...I bought SO many books during those few weeks. I'm recommitting myself to reading more this year. I've already finished one book so far this month (Dark Witch by Nora Roberts) and I'm nearly done with Devil. After I finish that, I'm going to read this book my sisters recommended called Cane River by Lalita Tademy. It's an Oprah's Book Club book and I usually don't read those kinds of books but I'm trying to expand my interests this year. After Cane River my cousin suggested that I read Divergent. I'm leery about jumping on board with trendy YA books (the movie is coming out soon) but she recommended The Hunger Games to me and I ended up loving it, so for now I'll trust her judgement. The movie looks interesting enough so I'm hoping it will hold my attention...

  20. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by kwanatic View Post
    ... my cousin suggested that I read Divergent. I'm leery about jumping on board with trendy YA books (the movie is coming out soon) but she recommended The Hunger Games to me and I ended up loving it, so for now I'll trust her judgement. The movie looks interesting enough so I'm hoping it will hold my attention...
    Don't get your hopes up for Divergent (the book). The first one is not bad, but no where near Hunger Games league. The 2nd and 3rd books in the trilogy are awful.

    However there is a half-decent story in there somewhere, and I think the movie(s) might actually be not bad. It will get rid of the clunky writing, and they can gloss over the plot holes and 2-dimensional characters with special effects.

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