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Thread: Pet Food Recall

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    Pet Food Recall

    Saw this on catforum.com, where I also am a member.

    http://www.foodsafetynews.com/2014/0.../#.UvXX7krVmpg

    Ohio company Pro-Pet, LLC, has initiated a voluntary recall of dry dog and cat foods because of possible Salmonella contamination.
    I'm adopting a cat in a week's time, and the first order of business is to transition it to a species-appropriate diet, which dry food absolutely is not.

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    The ironic thing is that a lot of people feed their pets dry food with the idea that it is safer since it won't "go bad" as fast when it sits out.
    Actual bumper sticker series: Jesus is my co-pilot. Satan is my financial advisor. Budha is my therapist. L. Ron Hubbard owes me $50.

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    Cats have salmonella in their guts most of the time. It poses no danger to them.

    If I owned a cat or dog, I'd be a bit pissed that the FDA is preoccupied with this and has thrown up its hands over the jerky treats killing animals and put them back on the shelves.

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    The PTB are just plain clueless about nutrition is why. My focus is on feline because I am getting a cat, not a dog, & I am astounded at the misconceptions out there that are pushed by vets (whose severely lacking nutrition education is usually taught by a pet food rep) & blindly accepted by owners. Dry food is actually the worst thing you can feed a cat - it is moisture-depleted, extremely high in carbs and the protein mostly comes from plant sources. It's no wonder that FLUTD, CKD, diabetes, IBD and obesity are so common in cats. Feeding raw homemade will go a long way to cut down or even eliminate the chance of developing these problems. A good canned food beats dry for moisture content too.

    http://catinfo.org - This site is my Bible for feline nutrition. It is maintained by a vet who is a feline nutrition specialist. I wish I could have her as my vet, because she is one of the few who aren't pimps for Science Diet and other unhealthy foods.

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    I normally post about recalls but was having computer issues so I am happy Karina1974 posted the information. Best advise I can give, is if it is sold in the supermarket or discount stores, AVOID!!! Don't believe the hype behind the commercials. The best dog foods don't advertise on tv.

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    Quote Originally Posted by judiz View Post
    I normally post about recalls but was having computer issues so I am happy Karina1974 posted the information. Best advise I can give, is if it is sold in the supermarket or discount stores, AVOID!!! Don't believe the hype behind the commercials. The best dog foods don't advertise on tv.
    Found that out the hard wag this week. I got a 2nd cat so decided to by a discount brand from the supermarket the result was horrible! Abigail my younger kitty who never had any problems suddenly lost her appetite and had diarrhea. So I got rid of it and went back to the brand I usual got for her and all problems went away. I'll never do that again!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Buzz View Post
    Found that out the hard wag this week. I got a 2nd cat so decided to by a discount brand from the supermarket the result was horrible! Abigail my younger kitty who never had any problems suddenly lost her appetite and had diarrhea. So I got rid of it and went back to the brand I usual got for her and all problems went away. I'll never do that again!
    I hope Abigail made a full recovery, I should amend my statement. The best dog AND cat foods do not advertise.

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    I have always fed my cat dry food and she is as fat as a house. And crazy. Maybe I should try something different but she is 12 years old and I don't know how happy she would be.

    We feed our puppy dry food and have been told that dry food is the best and to never get her hooked on wet food. Hmm...
    -Brian
    "Michelle would never be caught with sausage grease staining her Vera Wang." - rfisher

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    I've noticed that the advice from the vet has changed over the years regarding benefits of dry vs wet food for cats. I have always fed both to my cats. Recently my current cat started gaining weight and they suggested that I severely restrict the dry food. My cat is very happy with that as she has always preferred the wet stuff, but I thought the way she goes after that is what was causing the weight gain. Don't know.

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    Quote Originally Posted by BigB08822 View Post
    We feed our puppy dry food and have been told that dry food is the best and to never get her hooked on wet food. Hmm...
    Old-fashioned information based on what was known about pet nutrition 20-30 years ago. People still say it but it's not true.

    The problem is that cats, in particular, are carnivores. That means they eat primarily meat and raw meat in the wild. They are also descended from dessert cats so they are used to getting the fluids they need from their food and don't have a strong thirst instinct. But to make a kibble hold together and still be cheap, it needs to have a lot of starch in it and hardly any moisture. Cats can't digest starch properly.

    When you give cats a choice of what to eat, they don't necessarily eat exactly what they would eat in the wild -- which is more like the nutritional composition of a mouse -- but they don't eat more than about 20-26% of their calories from carbs and about 50-60% comes from protein. Most commercial kibble you get at the supermarket is 40-50% carbs and only about 8-10% moisture.

    As for drinking, even if you give your cats water, studies show they will drink some but not as much as they should. They will be slightly dehydrated compared to eating moisture-rich food such as raw or canned.

    Now, some cats are fine on kibble. Just like some people eat all wrong and never get heart attacks or obese. But lots of cats eat kibble and get type II diabetes or kidney problems or urniary tract infection or struggle with obesity and all of these problems are caused by being on a high carb diet and/or a diet with little moisture.

    For dogs, they have evolved from being true carnivores to being omnivores like we are so it's not as critical that they not be fed grains (they can digest them), but they should still be fed a meat-based diet, not a grain-based diet and they can still have issues with not getting enough fluids if they are fed only kibble. Most kibble gets a lot of its protein from grains and not meat unlike when you feed canned food.

    Another reason it may not be as critical with dogs is that a lot of dogs are fed table scraps so they are getting moisture and meat that way.
    Actual bumper sticker series: Jesus is my co-pilot. Satan is my financial advisor. Budha is my therapist. L. Ron Hubbard owes me $50.

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    Quote Originally Posted by BigB08822 View Post
    I have always fed my cat dry food and she is as fat as a house. And crazy. Maybe I should try something different but she is 12 years old and I don't know how happy she would be.
    Here's Dr. Lisa Person's page on transitioning cats off of a dry food diet. She successful transitioned all of her cats from dry to wet and, ultimately, to raw food, and her cats ranged in age from 2 to 10 years. It took her 3 months, but she managed it.

    http://www.catinfo.org/docs/TipsForT...ing1-14-11.pdf

    The key is to do it slowly and with patience and incorporate various tricks for the stubborn cats. The
    most important issue is actually making the change, not how fast you accomplish it. I must say
    that my cats tested every ounce of patience I had over a 3 + month period of time during their transition
    from dry to canned food. They had been on dry food their entire lives and did not recognize canned food
    as food. My cats ranged in age from 2 years to 10 years at the time of the transition.

    The single biggest mistake I see people make time and again is to say that their cat "won't touch" the new
    food and then panic and fill up the bowl with dry food. In many cases, it is simply not that easy to get cats
    off of dry food! So, roll up your sleeves and be prepared to patiently out-stubborn your cat.
    IMO every cat owner needs to read her website. When I was first reading up on what "having a cat" entailed, her's was the 2nd site I bookmarked. It is very unfortunate that the majority of vets still lack the knowledge that she and vets like Dr. Jean Hofve (littlebigcat.com) and the folks who run feline-nutrition.org espouse - that feeding your cat a species-appropriate diet can cut down or even eliminate the chances of the cat developing ailments that dry foods and high-carb foods contribute to. I love this quote from Dr. Pierson:

    Many cats suffer each day because of the water-depleted diets (read: any dry kibble) that humans insist on feeding to them. Out of all of the subjects discussed on my website, urinary tract health - especially urethral obstructions - is the subject that I am most passionate about.

    If the reader had to witness the tremendous suffering that a cat must endure when his (or, rarely, her) urethra becomes obstructed they would understand why this subject is so important.

    To be quite frank, if humans - including my veterinary colleagues - had a cork inserted into their urethra until they experienced the excruciating pain secondary to bladder distension and rupture, I have no doubt that they would start to take this issue much more seriously.
    Quote taken from -> http://www.catinfo.org/?link=urinarytracthealth
    Last edited by Karina1974; 02-10-2014 at 02:36 PM.

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    I have a dog. I have been feeding him Precise Holistic dry dog food. He drinks enough, so dry is not an issue with him. Plus, he has a sensitive stomach and wet dog food tends to give him the runs. Precise also makes cat products, both dry and canned. It is a small, family owned company in TX.

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    I give my dog Merrick Dry with a little Earthborn Holistic to hide his heart worm medication.

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    One thing I notice with Kiki and wet food is that she appears to love it but really doesn't eat much of it. I have given it to her a few times as a treat. She runs over as soon as she hears the can open and gets a whiff of it. She basically tackles me as I put the plate down but then she proceeds to almost exclusively lick off all the juice and leaves all the meat. If I leave the plate down long enough she will sometimes go back and nibble on the meat but rarely is more than half of it eaten.
    -Brian
    "Michelle would never be caught with sausage grease staining her Vera Wang." - rfisher

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    Wet food tends to have more calories than dry (per volume) so pets need to eat less of it to get the same calories.
    Actual bumper sticker series: Jesus is my co-pilot. Satan is my financial advisor. Budha is my therapist. L. Ron Hubbard owes me $50.

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    I've heard that wet is critical for cats, but not dogs.

    We're a dog only house, and our dog gets a grain free dry food. He personally can't digest grains and fails to keep them down.

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    ^^^Cats, being originally desert animals, don't have a high thirst drive. As such, they must get their moisture intake IN their food. A cat's natural prey is 65-70% water; dry food OTOH, is only about 10%.

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