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  1. #21
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    My Top Ten:

    Marina Anissina
    Ludmila Belusova
    Joffrey Bourdon*
    Barbara Fusar-Poli
    Anastasia Gimazetdinova
    Laetitia Hubert
    Olga Markova
    John Misha Petkevich
    Oleg Protopov
    Irina Rodnina

    Bourdon, of course, is a legend in much the same way that the Yeti or Sasquatch is a legend.

  2. #22

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    Quote Originally Posted by Vagabond View Post
    Bourdon, of course, is a legend in much the same way that the Yeti or Sasquatch is a legend.


    What about Nikolai Hedrizkov?

  3. #23

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    Michelle Kwan, Janet Lynn, Dick Button, Sonja Henie, Katarina Witt, the Protopopovs, Grinkov and Gordeeva, Shen and Zhao, Alexi Yagudin, Brian Boitano, Kurt Browning, John Curry, Dorothy Hamill, Peggy Fleming, Irina Slutskaya, Midori Ito.
    Last edited by giselle23; 10-26-2013 at 09:12 PM.

  4. #24

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    Sonja Henie, Dick Button, The Protopopovs, Peggy Fleming, Janet Lynn, Toller Cranston, John Curry, Dorothy Hamill, Scott Hamilton, Torvill and Dean, Katarina Witt, Brian Boitano, Gordeeva & Grinkov, Kurt Browning, Klimova & Ponomarenko, Midori Ito, Michelle Kwan, Evgeni Plushenko. If they win Gold in Sochi, add Yu-Na Kim and Patrick Chan.

  5. #25
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    I like most of your list, but I would take Yagudin off and put Kwan on.
    I'd take Yagudin off and leave Kwan off. I think Kwan is/will be legendary for US skating fans, but my impression has been fans in other parts of the world were much less wowed by her, and the list creator specified legendary world wide.

    I'd also make it Rodnina & Zietsev, since I found her first partner totally un-memorable. I would, in fact, leave off pretty much everyone that folks have suggested adding so far except for Janet Lynn and Dorothy Hamill. The only other pair I think have a case for adding would be Mishkutenok/Dmitriev partly because they defined a whole new style of pairs.

    I think a case can also be made for Scott Hamilton, as he won pretty much everything he entered for 4 seasons, brought a new kind of interpretive ability to ice skating, and really developed pro style skating.

    I think Kristi Y and Kurt Browning will also be remembered for decades in the US, I don't know if their legend will hold up world wide.

    For ice dance, Torvill & Dean are legendary, Klimova/Ponomarenko are a sentimental add for me, having spent 8 years rooting for them, but IMO no other dance team comes close to those two.

    I take legendary as meaning a skater people will still talk about in 30 or 50 years, the way fans today are still aware of Button and Henie and Curry. I think it is way too early to know which skaters of the past decade will hold up as legendary.

    Do we need to add Gillis Grafstrom, who defined figure skating in the early part of the 20th century, when it really was about skating figures? I guess, in her own way, Trixi Schuba is pretty legendary too.

  6. #26

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    I'd go with both unique, irreplaceable, and changed the sport. From that perspective:

    I'd add Cecelia Colledge, who really changed ladies skating from the look of Sonja Henie's skating to the more balletic look of today.

    And perhaps Reginald J. Wilkie and his partner Dapne Wallis who created the Argentine Tango, Quickstep, and Paso Doble CD's, and Courtney Jones who won Worlds in ice dance four times, two with June Markham, and two with Doreen Denny. With partner Peri Horne, he created the Starlight Waltz & Silver Samba CD's.

    And no one in ice dance, should be any more legendary that Lyudmila Pakhomova.

  7. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fandango View Post
    ...among skating fans worldwide, whatever that means (to you)???

    Personally I'd say: Sonja Henie, Dick Button, The Protopov's, Irina Rodnina & her partners, Toller Cranston, John Curry, Torvill & Dean, Katarina Witt, Kurt Browning, Gordeeva & Grinkov, Alexei Yagudin, Evgeny Plushenko, Shen & Zhao, Yuna Kim.

    ???
    It really is subjective by country, but I think one thing we can all agree on (regardless of country) is that titles and records, et al, count, they matter. Also who invented such & such. I'm thinking about all my figure skating books and the history of such, and I always see Sonja Henie's name (of course), as well as Gillis Grafstrom (record holder of most Olympic Medals won), Ulrich Salchow (1st mens Olympic Champion and inventor of the salchow jump), Madge Syers (1st womens Olympic Champion), Karl Schafer/Dick Button/Katarina Witt/Protopopovos/G&G/et al (2-time Olympic Champions), Irina Rodnina & her partners, etc., things like that. Oops, and also Jackson Haines, the inventor of modern day figure skating. And of course the 21st century's Evgeni Plushenko, second only to the 20th century's Gillis Grafstrom in number of Olympic Medals won, as a single, not a pair. To stand the test of time/history, one must have done more than won an Olympic Gold Medal to be added to the greats, the giants of figure skating. jmho from reading my figure skating books.

    Great topic btw.


    ETA: the difference between being an asterik in the figure skating history books (e.g. first to do such & such or youngest man/woman) versus being a legend and having a whole page or video dedicated to one is as I said earlier, one must have done more than won an Olympic Gold Medal. There must be more to one's story. However, I will concede that in order to be even considered as such one must have first won an Olympic Gold Medal first & foremost, that's a prerequisite.
    Last edited by NadineWhite; 10-27-2013 at 02:43 PM.

  8. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jammers View Post
    Yagudin not legendary? How does his record pale in comparison to Plushenko? Yagudin basically had to retire at 22 so he didn't even hit his peak as a skater and already had 4 World titles and a dominating win at the Olympics. Plushenko's record might not look as good if Yags had kept skating during the next Olympic cycle.
    I think we have to judge based on actual records, not what if... What if Yagudin or Plushenko would have skated in the '30s? Well, we don't know what would have happened.

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    I will concede that in order to be even considered as such one must have first won an Olympic Gold Medal first & foremost, that's a prerequisite.
    How ridiculous!

  10. #30

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    To me, legendary would mean someone who by their skating accomplishment changed the face of figure skating in their time to affect this current status of skating - that would take us back to the early, early parts of skating. (these are just the ones off the top of my head, I am sure I could think of many, many more)

    Axel Paulson: Axel jump as well as most of his career
    Alois Lutz: Lutz jump
    Sonia Heine: enough said
    Donald Jackson: first triple flip in competition, although some dispute that
    Dick Button: for a variety of things, Double Axel, commentator
    Katerina Witt: triple jump in competition, costume rule, etc
    Midori Ito: first triple axel in competition by a woman
    Kurt Browning: first ratified quad in competition
    Janet Lynn: changed figure skating through the eventual demise of figures in skating
    Zajic: jump rules
    B/S - S/P: scandal changed skating from 6.0 to the CoP
    Shen/Zhou: changing the face of pairs skating in China
    Brian Botanio: the 'tano Lutz (but I am not sure about that one - if someone was doing that before Brian made it mainstream)
    Torvil and Dean: Bolero, unanimous 6.0s for presentation
    Tim Goebel: first man to do multiple quads in one program
    Michelle Kwan: mostly because of her longevity, but also because of her numerous titles in her career
    Tara Lipinski: Is she one of the reasons behind the age restrictions at Olympics?
    Lucinda Ruh: fastest spins I ever saw

    However, some of you define legendary in a different manner. Most of what I posted are North American in nature, I am sure that other posters from around the world could add their "firsts" or changes in figure skating
    Last edited by numbers123; 10-27-2013 at 06:56 PM.

  11. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by NadineWhite View Post
    It really is subjective by country, but I think one thing we can all agree on (regardless of country) is that titles and records, et al, count, they matter. Also who invented such & such. I'm thinking about all my figure skating books and the history of such, and I always see Sonja Henie's name (of course), as well as Gillis Grafstrom (record holder of most Olympic Medals won), Ulrich Salchow (1st mens Olympic Champion and inventor of the salchow jump), Madge Syers (1st womens Olympic Champion), Karl Schafer/Dick Button/Katarina Witt/Protopopovos/G&G/et al (2-time Olympic Champions), Irina Rodnina & her partners, etc., things like that. Oops, and also Jackson Haines, the inventor of modern day figure skating. And of course the 21st century's Evgeni Plushenko, second only to the 20th century's Gillis Grafstrom in number of Olympic Medals won, as a single, not a pair. To stand the test of time/history, one must have done more than won an Olympic Gold Medal to be added to the greats, the giants of figure skating. jmho from reading my figure skating books.

    Great topic btw.


    ETA: the difference between being an asterik in the figure skating history books (e.g. first to do such & such or youngest man/woman) versus being a legend and having a whole page or video dedicated to one is as I said earlier, one must have done more than won an Olympic Gold Medal. There must be more to one's story. However, I will concede that in order to be even considered as such one must have first won an Olympic Gold Medal first & foremost, that's a prerequisite.
    Jackson Haines, of course, didn't win an Olympic Gold Medal as he performed before the Olympic era.

    In general, I do think results are a big factor but not the only factor. For example, Dick Button obviously has the results and the "firsts"/records he holds are truly astounding. But I'd argue that his legendary status is certainly boosted by how big a presence he was in figure skating AFTER his competitive career. More than any other commentator, I'd argue (certainly English speaking commentator, but I'd be intrigued to hear foreign examples as well) he's shaped what an audience feels modern figure skating should be.

    Vash mentioned this in the successful skater becomes successful coach thread, but I'd argue you've got skaters like Mishin and Moskvina who, as coaches, shaped the sport in profound ways.

    I have no problem with Shen/Zhao being thought of in that stratosphere. The most successful Chinese figure skaters ever. At least one skate for the all time lists. Athletically very gifted with HUGE elements. If they help foster a successful generation, well, I think it would be "inarguable" (inasmunch as anything is inarguable on the internet, anyway).

  12. #32

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    Tonya Harding

  13. #33

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    I'm not sure of exactly how many names my own list would include, but Chen Lu would probably make the cut.

  14. #34
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    The skaters already listed are legendary to me.

    I'm also including in my list Paul Wiley, Todd Eldredge, Nancy Kerrigan, Elizabeth Punsalan and Jerod Swallow, Dorothy Hamill, Scott Hamilton and Viktor Petrenko.

    There's more, but my list would be very long by the time I finished.
    Angie
    “I have not failed. I’ve just found 10,000 ways that won’t work.” ~ Thomas A. Edison

  15. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by numbers123 View Post
    To me, legendary would mean someone who by their skating accomplishment changed the face of figure skating in their time to affect this current status of skating - that would take us back to the early, early parts of skating. (these are just the ones off the top of my head, I am sure I could think of many, many more)

    Axel Paulson: Axel jump as well as most of his career
    Alois Lutz: Lutz jump
    Sonia Heine: enough said
    Donald Jackson: first triple flip in competition, although some dispute that
    Dick Button: for a variety of things, Double Axel, commentator
    Katerina Witt: triple jump in competition, costume rule, etc
    Midori Ito: first triple axel in competition by a woman
    Kurt Browning: first ratified quad in competition
    Janet Lynn: changed figure skating through the eventual demise of figures in skating
    Zajic: jump rules
    B/S - S/P: scandal changed skating from 6.0 to the CoP
    Shen/Zhou: changing the face of pairs skating in China
    Brian Botanio: the 'tano Lutz (but I am not sure about that one - if someone was doing that before Brian made it mainstream)
    Torvil and Dean: Bolero, unanimous 6.0s for presentation
    Tim Goebel: first man to do multiple quads in one program
    Michelle Kwan: mostly because of her longevity, but also because of her numerous titles in her career
    Tara Lipinski: Is she one of the reasons behind the age restrictions at Olympics?
    Lucinda Ruh: fastest spins I ever saw

    However, some of you define legendary in a different manner. Most of what I posted are North American in nature, I am sure that other posters from around the world could add their "firsts" or changes in figure skating
    In your logic:
    Evgeni Plushenko: 4+3+2 and 4+3+3 combo in history
    Elvis Stojko 4+3 combo

  16. #36

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    Nina Bates
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  17. #37

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    Quote Originally Posted by lala View Post
    In your logic:
    Evgeni Plushenko: 4+3+2 and 4+3+3 combo in history
    Elvis Stojko 4+3 combo
    yes. Those things did indeed change today's skating expectations.

  18. #38

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    Quote Originally Posted by Susan M View Post
    I'd take Yagudin off and leave Kwan off. I think Kwan is/will be legendary for US skating fans, but my impression has been fans in other parts of the world were much less wowed by her, and the list creator specified legendary world wide.

    I'd also make it Rodnina & Zietsev, since I found her first partner totally un-memorable. I would, in fact, leave off pretty much everyone that folks have suggested adding so far except for Janet Lynn and Dorothy Hamill. The only other pair I think have a case for adding would be Mishkutenok/Dmitriev partly because they defined a whole new style of pairs.

    I think a case can also be made for Scott Hamilton, as he won pretty much everything he entered for 4 seasons, brought a new kind of interpretive ability to ice skating, and really developed pro style skating.

    I think Kristi Y and Kurt Browning will also be remembered for decades in the US, I don't know if their legend will hold up world wide.

    For ice dance, Torvill & Dean are legendary, Klimova/Ponomarenko are a sentimental add for me, having spent 8 years rooting for them, but IMO no other dance team comes close to those two.

    I take legendary as meaning a skater people will still talk about in 30 or 50 years, the way fans today are still aware of Button and Henie and Curry. I think it is way too early to know which skaters of the past decade will hold up as legendary.

    Do we need to add Gillis Grafstrom, who defined figure skating in the early part of the 20th century, when it really was about skating figures? I guess, in her own way, Trixi Schuba is pretty legendary too.
    Kwan has 5 World Championships, so I think a significant portion of the "rest of the world" is wowed by her or at least acknowledges her legendary status. Janet Lynn is more of a legend in Japan than in the US. She certainly belongs on the list, too.

  19. #39
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    Kwan has 5 World Championships, so I think a significant portion of the "rest of the world" is wowed by her
    Championships are awarded by judges, who score by the rulebook and don't need to be wowed. My point was that she was not as popular nor held in such high regard by fans in other parts of the world. I think legendary is defined more broadly than titles. Kwan was an excellent textbook skater, remarkable for her jumping consistency, but she didn't really bring anything new to skating nor change the sport in any way.

  20. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by her grace View Post
    Tonya Harding
    In Boxing, most certainly. Why, Ali, Louis, and Dempsey have NOTHING on her.

    And Denise Biehlmann should be included for that LOVELY move named after her.

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