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  1. #1
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    Isadora Williams puts Brazil on Olympic skating map

    Article/interview: http://web.icenetwork.com/news/2013/...ic-skating-map
    Excerpts:
    Icenetwork: You were born in Atlanta and raised in the U.S. What is your connection with Brazil, and why did you choose to compete for this country?

    Williams: My mother is from Belo Horizonte in Minas Gerais, Brazil, and I also have a very large family that lives in Brazil. Brazil is absolutely beautiful, and we try to visit as often as we can. My mother always talked to me about representing her country in figure skating, but I don't think either of us ever expected it to go this far. For me, the idea of representing a sport that had little tradition in Brazil seemed really intriguing.
    ...
    Icenetwork: How do you see figure skating developing in your country? Are there young girls who already follow your example?

    Williams: Yes, but Brazil lacks the programs and facilities to really promote figure skating. We have yet to build an Olympic- or NHL-sized rink. I recently went to Rio de Janeiro for a presentation at a half-sized rink called Barra on Ice and was able to meet many young, aspiring skaters. They were so supportive of my skating, and I was very impressed by their ambition and enthusiasm toward the sport.

    I would love for there to be a full-sized rink for them and future Brazilian figure skaters to train in.
    Her SP at 2013 Nebelhorn (50.35, 8th place) was much better than her FS and got her the Olympic spot - here it is (British Eurosport): http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XcONWYwZZFk
    Link to her ISU bio: http://www.isuresults.com/bios/isufs00012577.htm

    Re-posting this video that aired in Brazil in March 2013 that still plays:
    Quote Originally Posted by Sylvia View Post
    Isadora Williams, 17, will represent Brazil at her first Senior Worlds - here's a news story on her that aired on Brazilian TV: http://globoesporte.globo.com/esport...-gelo/2451275/
    She is coached by Andrei Kriukov in Ashburn, Virginia.
    Last edited by Sylvia; 10-08-2013 at 11:19 PM. Reason: To add more info
    "Randy [Starkman (1960-April 16, 2012)] lived by the same motto as the rest of us. The Olympics isn’t every four years, it’s every single day. He just got it." --Canadian Olympic kayaker Adam van Koeverden

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    it's wonderful when young girls can inspire others in countries with less of a tradition in figure skating to take up this beautiful sport.

    it was heart breaking to see her expressions after the FS at Nelbelhorn ... she didn't realize at all that she managed to hang onto the last Olympic spot!

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    I enjoyed reading the IN article (thanks for posting it Sylvia).

    In particular I noted her words about realizing her dream, and that she will work harder than she has ever done before and will incorporate harder jumps into her programs.

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    Williams: Yes, but Brazil lacks the programs and facilities to really promote figure skating. We have yet to build an Olympic- or NHL-sized rink. I recently went to Rio de Janeiro for a presentation at a half-sized rink called Barra on Ice and was able to meet many young, aspiring skaters. They were so supportive of my skating, and I was very impressed by their ambition and enthusiasm toward the sport.
    If that is true, given the ISU requirement below, how does Brazil qualify to be a member of the ISU?

    3. Minimum requirements
    In order to guarantee the activity of Members in organizing and administering the ISU sport disciplines, the following minimum requirements for
    Membership in the ISU shall be required.
    .....
    (ix) in existence in the country one or more actively operating natural or artificial ice rinks of a size adequate to practice the respective ISU sport discipline.
    "I miss footwork that has any kind of a discernible pattern. The goal of a step sequence should not be for a skater to show the same ice coverage as a Zamboni and take about as much time as an ice resurface. " ~ Zemgirl, reflecting on a pre-IJS straight line sequence

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    WHEEEEE!!!!!
    Go Izzy!!


    Quote Originally Posted by BittyBug View Post
    If that is true, given the ISU requirement below, how does Brazil qualify to be a member of the ISU?
    No idea.
    It's not like it doesn't have one now (but it used to), Brazil has never had a single decent sized ice rink. All of rinks are stamp sized mall rinks.
    Dá-lhe, Isadora!!
    Lead me not into temptation. I can find it, and eat it, all by myself.

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    Quote Originally Posted by beepbeep View Post
    WHEEEEE!!!!!
    Go Izzy!!




    No idea.
    It's not like it doesn't have one now (but it used to), Brazil has never had a single decent sized ice rink. All of rinks are stamp sized mall rinks.

    Go Isadora!!
    Yes, unfortunately Brazil don't even have a decent sized ice rink... It's sad, because everybody here in Brazil are charmed when they have access to this sport (only in the OG...)
    Isadora is an athlete with a lot of willpower to achieve your dream, because it's not easy being a brazilian athlete. There is a great lack of support, especially economic to athletes, and great force is necessary to achieve goals without this support.
    But either way she achieved her dream, and the merit is all hers, her family and coaches. And all of us Brazilians who follow skating are very proud of her and we'll be cheering a lot for her and that sport has more popularity and structure to be practiced here.

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    Congrats. It is always heartening to note the lesser known countries in ice skating doing well. I hope the government is able to give her scholarship to train overseas in view of the limited resources in Brazil. It will really help her. good luck.
    Prosperity makes friends, adversity tries them. – Publilius Syrus

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    Quote Originally Posted by spikydurian View Post
    Congrats. It is always heartening to note the lesser known countries in ice skating doing well. I hope the government is able to give her scholarship to train overseas in view of the limited resources in Brazil. It will really help her. good luck.

    She skates in the DC area and was born in Atlanta.

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    Quote Originally Posted by spikydurian View Post
    Congrats. It is always heartening to note the lesser known countries in ice skating doing well. I hope the government is able to give her scholarship to train overseas in view of the limited resources in Brazil. It will really help her. good luck.
    Quote Originally Posted by reese View Post
    She skates in the DC area and was born in Atlanta.
    reese has answered it

    I've written this about a hundred times by now, but here's you 1253464th reminder
    She IS Brazilian: any child born of at least one Brazilian parent, wherever in the world, is Brazilian.
    Her mom is Brazilian, so there you have it.

    And her family has paid for all of her skating. The Brazilian ice sports governing body is absolutely shite, and, as of now and as far as I know, never given financial support to either her or Luiz Manella (I think they paid for traveling/entry fees of some competitions).
    Dá-lhe, Isadora!!
    Lead me not into temptation. I can find it, and eat it, all by myself.

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    Quote Originally Posted by beepbeep View Post
    reese has answered it

    I've written this about a hundred times by now, but here's you 1253464th reminder
    She IS Brazilian: any child born of at least one Brazilian parent, wherever in the world, is Brazilian.
    Her mom is Brazilian, so there you have it.

    And her family has paid for all of her skating. The Brazilian ice sports governing body is absolutely shite, and, as of now and as far as I know, never given financial support to either her or Luiz Manella (I think they paid for traveling/entry fees of some competitions).
    How much money could they possibly have to give support outside of travel/entry fees?

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    Quote Originally Posted by beepbeep View Post
    The Brazilian ice sports governing body is absolutely shite, and, as of now and as far as I know, never given financial support to either her or Luiz Manella (I think they paid for traveling/entry fees of some competitions).
    They probably don't have any money to give. I know that's the case with a lot of the smaller ISU members who are run on a largely voluntary basis.
    To think that fun is simple fun, while earnest things are earnest, proves all too plain that neither one thou truthfully discernest.

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    Recently the Brazilian Confederation of Ice Sports also underwent a management crisis, and this has also affected for a moment the support for athletes who practice these sports. This was also a hurdle in recent times.
    Last edited by Lety; 10-09-2013 at 05:48 PM.

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    Isadora's SP at Nebelhorn was wonderful. I thought she actually should have got a higher score.

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    I believe I read in an interview she gave she visits Brazil, but has never lived there. I think if you are going to represent a country at the Olympics, there should be some minimal residential requirement for the country you are representing. That being said, I do think she did a good job with her short program and looks promising.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Iceman View Post
    I believe I read in an interview she gave she visits Brazil, but has never lived there. I think if you are going to represent a country at the Olympics, there should be some minimal residential requirement for the country you are representing. That being said, I do think she did a good job with her short program and looks promising.
    (my bolding)
    Why? You don't think being a citizen of that country is enough? Isadora happened to pick a sport where taking up residence in one of her countries (Brazil) wouldn't get her anywhere due to lack of facilities and coaching options. If she had chosen soccer (football) for instance, then it might have made for an interesting choice of residencies or been able to realistically split-time.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Iceman View Post
    I believe I read in an interview she gave she visits Brazil, but has never lived there. I think if you are going to represent a country at the Olympics, there should be some minimal residential requirement for the country you are representing. That being said, I do think she did a good job with her short program and looks promising.
    Suppose the shoe had been on the other foot and she'd been born in, say, Germany, to an American father and a German mother, and grown up there. And suppose she trained in Germany but wanted to compete for the U.S. Would we as a society say, no, you cannot do it unless you move here, or would we say, we are proud you want to represent us, now go out and do your best?

    And why should the ISU or IOC care, as long as her Federation wants her and she has citizenship?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Lety View Post
    Recently the Brazilian Confederation of Ice Sports also underwent a management crisis, and this has also affected for a moment the support for athletes who practice these sports. This was also a hurdle in recent times.
    I understand it was also a political crisis between CBDG (Brazilian Ice Sports Federation) and the Brazilian Olympic Committee (COB), with allegations of corruption flying both ways. During that time, CBDG athletes got no financial help at all.

    Quote Originally Posted by bmcg View Post
    How much money could they possibly have to give support outside of travel/entry fees?
    Things tend to be done a bit different in Brazil: if a hight level athlete trains at a club, the club tends to pick up the tab. And, if the club doesn't have a sponsor, the sports ministry pays the club back. I don't know what kind of agreement CBDG with its athletes as far as helping with training fees, since the athletes train outside of the country are not affiliated to a club.

    Quote Originally Posted by allezfred View Post
    They probably don't have any money to give. I know that's the case with a lot of the smaller ISU members who are run on a largely voluntary basis.
    The thing is, they do.
    We don't have a figure skating federation, we have CBDG, which rules all ice sports (speed/figure sakting, bobsled, skeleton, curling and hockey) and they get money from COB and the Sports Ministry. The problem is that nobody knows exactly where the money goes.
    Every time the winter olympics roll around, the press has the "look at taxpayers money being wasted in winter sports, which are pointless for the country since we'll make a fool of ourselves at the games".
    Dá-lhe, Isadora!!
    Lead me not into temptation. I can find it, and eat it, all by myself.

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    Quote Originally Posted by beepbeep View Post

    The thing is, they do.
    We don't have a figure skating federation, we have CBDG, which rules all ice sports (speed/figure sakting, bobsled, skeleton, curling and hockey) and they get money from COB and the Sports Ministry. The problem is that nobody knows exactly where the money goes.
    Every time the winter olympics roll around, the press has the "look at taxpayers money being wasted in winter sports, which are pointless for the country since we'll make a fool of ourselves at the games".
    Sorry to hear that beepbeep. That's really awful for the skaters.

    Countries like Brazil should be putting all the funding they get into their young skaters to develop the sport more.
    To think that fun is simple fun, while earnest things are earnest, proves all too plain that neither one thou truthfully discernest.

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    beepbeep, sorry to hear about the lack of support for winter athletes in Brazil. It's frustuating indeed. It is quite common that with limited budget allocated to athletes, it is always the more popular sports which get the bigger cake leaving the athletes of less popular sports to foot their own training bills. I wish the government could consider allocating some kind of scholarship to athletes who have proven to be able to reach a high standard on their own so that the monies can go into supporting them to obtain better coaching and training facilities.
    Prosperity makes friends, adversity tries them. – Publilius Syrus

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    Quote Originally Posted by Iceman View Post
    I believe I read in an interview she gave she visits Brazil, but has never lived there. I think if you are going to represent a country at the Olympics, there should be some minimal residential requirement for the country you are representing. That being said, I do think she did a good job with her short program and looks promising.
    I agree, Iceman, and was disappointed to read that she's actually from the USA, not a native of the country that she's representing. Still, I enjoyed her and her skate the first time I saw her skate at Nebelhorn, as she reminded me of Shakespear's R&J quote about a rose.

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