Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123
Results 41 to 47 of 47
  1. #41
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Iowa
    Posts
    10,415
    vCash
    500
    Rep Power
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by heckles View Post
    Some Episcopalian and other traditionally liturgical denominations have contemporary services, but that's a source of controversy in itself. What's happened in some of those congregations, especially with the youth, is that they grow to like the contemporary worship style and eventually end up switching to unaffiliated mega-churches offering the same worship style. A "gateway drug" of sorts.
    Even Catholic churches often offer contemporary worship- their Life Teen masses. It's still the same mass, but with a rock band. However, since I'm looking at churches that do this, maybe it was a gateway drug. Of course, I'm moving churches more over tolerance issues than music.

    One nice thing is even the 'mega churches' here have fewer than 200 people at a service. There just isn't a population here to support a mega church.

  2. #42
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    3,025
    vCash
    500
    Rep Power
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by Skittl1321 View Post
    One nice thing is even the 'mega churches' here have fewer than 200 people at a service. There just isn't a population here to support a mega church.
    The advantage of mega-churches is that you can find exactly your demographic, if that's what you want. Singles over age 50 have a group specific to that...Mexican food fans have a Monday night group...more power to them, if it's fun for them.

  3. #43
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Posts
    23,837
    vCash
    500
    Rep Power
    0
    Here's my suggestion for you--try a Disciples of Christ church. Here's one in the area:
    http://www.icdisciples.org/en/

    The denomination is liberal, and has formal connections to UCC. But it tends to have a more traditional worship service that would feel familiar to you. They have communion every Sunday like Catholics do. They are a small denomination, but extremely social justice oriented, so tend to have many programs and ministries to get involved in whatever the size of the congregation. And if you want to feel intellectually fed, the Disciples have one of the strongest intellection/scholarly traditions of any denomination out there. Think of them like the Jesuits. A very learned clergy, and they appeal to very learned congregations. Many of your top theological/divinity schools in the US are actually affiliated with the Disciples (eg. Yale, University of Chicago, Texas Christian University, etc.) because of that long scholarly tradition. They have no credo statements except that they believe in Christ and communion--everything else is open for debate. You can have some conservative folk, and some extremely liberal, but they all fit in within the belief system of the denomination.

    Anyhow, you might want to give it a try. Ditto for elkask8.

    ETA: I'm not a member of the Disciples of Christ denomination btw--just my own .02 on what I think might be a good fit for you.

  4. #44

    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Posts
    3,258
    vCash
    500
    Rep Power
    7853
    Quote Originally Posted by KatieC View Post
    but I also always considered myself Protestant, not Catholic, regardless of what the Nicene Creed says. .
    The word "catholic" in the Nicene creed means "universal" not Roman Catholic. It is always written with a small c, not the capital C.

  5. #45
    Skating supporter
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    Born in Nova Scotia but living in Ottawa, Ontario (Canada's Capital)
    Posts
    3,484
    vCash
    500
    Rep Power
    5293
    Quote Originally Posted by sk8pics View Post
    I did not know this. Thanks for the info. But surely many people of all denominations respect leaders of other faiths. I hope so, anyway. But thanks for this.
    I didn't mean that we are unusual in respecting leaders of other faiths, but rather that we recognize and respect the Pope, as a faith leader, but do not follow his directives.

    By the way, I deliberately wrote the word catholic with a small "c" as referenced in the Nicene Creed, ie. meaning universal and not Roman Catholic.
    Can't skate but love to watch

  6. #46

    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Posts
    3,258
    vCash
    500
    Rep Power
    7853
    Quote Originally Posted by victorskid View Post
    I didn't mean that we are unusual in respecting leaders of other faiths, but rather that we recognize and respect the Pope, as a faith leader, but do not follow his directives.

    By the way, I deliberately wrote the word catholic with a small "c" as referenced in the Nicene Creed, ie. meaning universal and not Roman Catholic.
    Thank you for the clarification. Yes, I know the distinction between the words catholic and Catholic. I know a lot of people who do not understand that, though.

  7. #47
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Midwest
    Posts
    4,723
    vCash
    500
    Rep Power
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by agalisgv View Post
    Here's my suggestion for you--try a Disciples of Christ church. Here's one in the area:
    http://www.icdisciples.org/en/

    The denomination is liberal, and has formal connections to UCC. But it tends to have a more traditional worship service that would feel familiar to you. They have communion every Sunday like Catholics do. They are a small denomination, but extremely social justice oriented, so tend to have many programs and ministries to get involved in whatever the size of the congregation. And if you want to feel intellectually fed, the Disciples have one of the strongest intellection/scholarly traditions of any denomination out there. Think of them like the Jesuits. A very learned clergy, and they appeal to very learned congregations. Many of your top theological/divinity schools in the US are actually affiliated with the Disciples (eg. Yale, University of Chicago, Texas Christian University, etc.) because of that long scholarly tradition. They have no credo statements except that they believe in Christ and communion--everything else is open for debate. You can have some conservative folk, and some extremely liberal, but they all fit in within the belief system of the denomination.

    Anyhow, you might want to give it a try. Ditto for elkask8.

    ETA: I'm not a member of the Disciples of Christ denomination btw--just my own .02 on what I think might be a good fit for you.
    I grew up in that denomination. It is extremely important to know that they value the independence of the local church above all else. The result is that while some are very liberal and tolerant, some are preaching evangelical theology and conservative politics and no one anywhere is going to intervene on either side. My aunt and uncle's Disciples church is exceedingly liberal and social justice oriented. The church my mother and her siblings grew up in later had a pastor with no degree of any kind that I once heard preach a sermon about how God set the Bible up so that the verses numbered "3:16" were all more important than the rest (a thesis that holds up for all of the three seconds it takes you to look up a random verse with that number). A Disciples church near my parents' house functions like an evangelical mega-church complete with conservative politics.

    In other words, a Disciples church is going to be like rolling dice.

Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •