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  1. #21

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    Quote Originally Posted by Gazpacho View Post
    Those statements/actions by the golfers I mentioned certainly sound whiny and wimpy when you consider that gymnasts compete on a four inch beam with the crowd and another gymnast's floor music in the background.

    At the same time, the gymnasts are so used to it and have grown up with it, so they can tune it out more easily than a golfer who hasn't had to deal with it, and it's harder to adapt when you're older.

    Are there entry fees for golf tournaments with contracts signed? If not, then suing event organizers for allowing non-flash photography and having snarky spectators removed by police is outrageous. If there are entry fees, then I can see a valid argument.
    Yes, there are entry fees. The lowest ones are on the LPGA futures tour - $500 a pop. It goes up from there. Players pay $5,000 to compete at the PGA tour qualifying school.

    Bubba Watson encouraged the crowd to cheer at the Ryder Cup and again at the 17th hole in Phoenix (a notorious party hole). He said that the constant noise was fine and he preferred that to having one person make a noise when everyone else is quiet.
    AceOn6, the golf loving skating fan

  2. #22

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    Quote Originally Posted by cruisin View Post
    They do announce, at skating events, that flash photography is not permitted. But, people do it anyway. I don't know if they can confiscate the camera, but they certainly can make them leave. Maybe it should be printed on the ticket, like a contract. so, if they violate the contract, the ticket is void and they have to leave.
    When I was announcing for our little comp the other weekend, I made a point of telling people not to use flash photography, but I also explained why. It seems to me that the standard spiel is "Please remember, no flash photography is allowed" but no-one ever says why. Even if at comps the announcer just said, "Please remember, no flash photography as it is very dangerous for the skaters" it would be better. Regulars know why flashes are banned, but casuals might not and might think that they say that because they want people to buy the official photos. (No lie, I actually had this argument with a parent at the rink one day. "Oh, it's just so the official photographer makes more money!")

  3. #23

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    All of the skating tickets I have ever bought (admittedly not that many) state on the back on the ticket that no flash photographer is allowed and that they are able to confiscate your camera and/or make you leave. There are several other rules, too, but I can't remember them. I don't think it makes any difference. The Chinese also use flash photography at the ballet, open, acrobatics etc. etc.

  4. #24
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    It's a good thing to make announcements but I've found that it's not enforced at most of the comps or shows I've been at. Yeah, sometimes there's a zealous usher who jumps on any infraction but generally, no. I arrived late at a comp one evening due to a flight delay and when I got there the usher wanted to lead me to my seat (close to the ice) in the middle of a free skate. When I said I'd wait until the skate was done she looked at me like I was crazy.
    Last edited by milanessa; 06-29-2013 at 04:08 AM.
    3539 and counting.

    Slightly Wounding Banana list cont: MacMadame.

  5. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by misskarne View Post
    When I was announcing for our little comp the other weekend, I made a point of telling people not to use flash photography, but I also explained why. It seems to me that the standard spiel is "Please remember, no flash photography is allowed" but no-one ever says why. Even if at comps the announcer just said, "Please remember, no flash photography as it is very dangerous for the skaters" it would be better. Regulars know why flashes are banned, but casuals might not and might think that they say that because they want people to buy the official photos. (No lie, I actually had this argument with a parent at the rink one day. "Oh, it's just so the official photographer makes more money!")
    Good point. Maybe if people understood the reason, they would follow the rule. Though, I suspect there would still be a few who don't think they have to follow any rules.

  6. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by cruisin View Post
    Good point. Maybe if people understood the reason, they would follow the rule. Though, I suspect there would still be a few who don't think they have to follow any rules.
    Some people just might not know how to use their cameras. My camera was broken at the time of Nats and I was using my mother's and had a hard time figuring out how to turn the flash off (and heck if she knew--she has low vision and can't read the menu options at all so she just uses it set on automatic for everything). I deleted a lot of pics of my lap and the floor while trying to make sure it wasn't on because at the beginning second session, I discovered it had come back on "automatic flash", fortunately that was when I took a picture of empty ice before the warm-up started. Some people might not be so careful and unintentionally have the flash on.

  7. #27

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    Quote Originally Posted by cruisin View Post
    Good point. Maybe if people understood the reason, they would follow the rule. Though, I suspect there would still be a few who don't think they have to follow any rules.
    I'm shocked they don't explain why it's necessary for safety reasons. It's common sense for them to do so.

  8. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gazpacho View Post
    I'm shocked they don't explain why it's necessary for safety reasons. It's common sense for them to do so.
    I've been to a few Nationals and Internationals, where they have and some where they have not. Honestly, it doesn't stop people who are going to take flash photos regardless. What I don't understand is why they think they need to use a flash. The flash has a very short range. Not close to enough range to light the skater on the ice. In fact, with the flash on, the camera is more likely to account for the flash and you wind up with a darker photo.

  9. #29

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    Quote Originally Posted by cruisin View Post
    I've been to a few Nationals and Internationals, where they have and some where they have not. Honestly, it doesn't stop people who are going to take flash photos regardless. What I don't understand is why they think they need to use a flash. The flash has a very short range. Not close to enough range to light the skater on the ice. In fact, with the flash on, the camera is more likely to account for the flash and you wind up with a darker photo.
    I think they put it on Auto, and the flash goes off, and they don't realize it until they've already taken the picture.

  10. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gazpacho View Post
    I think they put it on Auto, and the flash goes off, and they don't realize it until they've already taken the picture.
    Even with a camera on auto, you can easily turn the flash off. I think people have a responsibility to know how to operate their camera and be respectful of the athletes. I realize that some people will occasionally make a mistake, that is certainly forgivable. But, there are many who just don't care and don't fix the flash after they realize it's on. In some sports, that is annoying. In others, like skating, it's down right dangerous.

  11. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by Skittl1321 View Post
    However, if Yuna Kim skates in the Olympics in Korea, we may see if there is a restart when she is blinded by flashes at her first jump... the idea terrifies me, since her fans seem to be especially rabid.
    If this hasn't been an issue until now with Kim's fans, I don't know why it would be any more likely for them in particular in Sochi.

    Quote Originally Posted by misskarne View Post
    When I was announcing for our little comp the other weekend, I made a point of telling people not to use flash photography, but I also explained why. It seems to me that the standard spiel is "Please remember, no flash photography is allowed" but no-one ever says why.
    In almost every competition I've been to in the last decade, the announcer has followed with "It is dangerous for the skaters."

    Quote Originally Posted by Gazpacho View Post
    I think they put it on Auto, and the flash goes off, and they don't realize it until they've already taken the picture.
    That's why it's important to take a test photo and get feedback on whether there's a flash. I often see/hear that happening, and it takes about five seconds to ensure you're not being disruptive.
    "The team doesn't get automatic capacity because management is mad" -- Greg Smith, agile guy

  12. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by kwanfan1818 View Post
    That's why it's important to take a test photo and get feedback on whether there's a flash. I often see/hear that happening, and it takes about five seconds to ensure you're not being disruptive.
    I had an older camera that would turn itself off, if I didn't use it for 5-10 minutes. Sometimes I would forget that I had to re-turn off the flash when I "restarted" the camera. I just never brought it to skating competitions.

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