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  1. #61
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gazpacho View Post
    Um, no....

    It's difficult to get numbers because people have their agendas. Researchers at universities are less likely to have conflicts of interest, so I've relied on those papers for these statistics. All statistics are for the US in one year.

    Number of planned puppy births in private households (mostly breeders): 3.38 million
    Number of unplanned puppy births in private households: 2.60 million
    Number of puppies bought at pet shops (almost all puppy mills): 170,000

    ...
    wow. Thank you for posting this.

    Please spay/neuter your dog or cat companion.

    @ross_hy Hooray for you! Good luck!
    Congratulations 2014 World Ice Dance Champions Anna Cappellini & Luca Lanotte!!!

  2. #62

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    One of the things we have to beware of around here is private "kennels" that sell puppy mill pups. I'd avoid any kennel or breeder that claims to have many different breeds of puppies available.

    I'd also suggest getting a locally-bred puppy - or at least within driving distance. You might need to contact the breeder somewhere down the road and if they're states away, that could be difficult.

    My last two dogs have been shelter rescues. One (aka Muttley) was from the Local Animal Rescue league and the most recent I found through Pet-Finder with the help of a college friend. I did research breeds but I didn't get stuck on any one. "Big, Black and Furry" was my criteria - and that's exactly what I got.
    I'd rather be thought of as absolutely ridiculous than as absolutely boring.

  3. #63
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    Quote Originally Posted by Japanfan View Post
    Pet store owners unfortunately keep the puppy mill business alive. The puppies at least get out and have a chance of a good life - it's the moms kept pregnant constantly, living their entire life in a tiny cage, that are truly heart-breaking.

    I believe that California does not allow pet stores to sell puppies. If pet store owners would stop using puppy mills, they would cease to survive. I've never understood how pet stores could support puppy mills. And there mark-up is already three times that of breeders some time. I know someone who spent $3000 on a young Pekingese puppy and $2000 on another that had been there six months. That poor puppy grew into a dog with a lot of problems.
    Totally agree. I don't know why puppy mills aren't shut down. I walked into a pet store that sells dogs about 7 years ago. I was waiting for my Cav to be old enough to pick up from the breeder. I saw a little Cav in a cage, there. The poor thing was clearly sick. Physically and neurologically. It was snapping at flies that weren't there. Constantly. And it was shaking, underweight, not proportioned. It broke my heart.

  4. #64

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    I think people need to consider WHY they're looking at a specific breed. If it's because of allergies or temperment or to potentially show or breed the animal, then I can see going to a breeder and paying mega-$$$ for one. But it the reason you're only looking at Akitas or Burmese Moutain Dogs is because it looks cool or is the celebrity Pet-Of-The_Month, then maybe you should reconsider. When the movie "101 Dalmations" came out, suddenly every little kid wanted a cute spotted puppy. And six months later, the shelters were full of Dalmations who turned out to be too much dog for the family and were surrendered for bing what they were bred to be: big, happy, excitable, energetic animals.

    And even breeders aren't always reliable sources. One of my friends bought a pure bred Golden Retriever from a supposedly reputable breeder (although in another state) and, just in time for her young son to become attached to the puppy, has learned that the dog has just about every hereditary ailment at Golden Retriever can have. They're facing thousands of dollars in vet bills and the breeder has been no help at all - and asince the breeder is out of state, there seems to be little my friend can do.
    I'd rather be thought of as absolutely ridiculous than as absolutely boring.

  5. #65
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    What your friend should have done was ask for the health records of the parents. Really reputable breeders won't breed a dog with heritable health issues. Both of my Poodles breeders (of both the male and female) and my Akita follow all the puppies they sell for years especially if it was a new breeding. They wanted to know any health issues and any behavioral/training issues. I called both when Bella developed IMHA and let them know although IMHA isn't considered heritable. You have to check the "reputable" breeder as well. If they don't have the health records of the parents, then they aren't reputable.

    My Poodles and Akita both came from AKC show stock. My Akita's grandsire won BoS at Westminister. Both Poodles came from multiple champions including multiple types of champions (bench, companion, agility for the Poodles). While I wasn't planning to show them and paid a non-showing price for the puppies, I had information on multiple generations of dogs and breeders. I knew what I was getting with all 3 dogs.
    Those who never succeed themselves are always the first to tell you how.

  6. #66

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    I know that, but unfortunately my friend was a first-time dog owner (she got the puppy hoping to cheer up her young son after his father died last year) and didn't know what to do or ask. And now the breeder isn't responding to her at all - after telling her to return the puppy and she (the breeder) would have it put to sleep. Great thing to tell a little boy who loves the dog, huh?

    My great uncle bred show quality miniature pinchers; when he broke up his kennel after his partner died, we got five of them. Every one was different, even the ones from the same litter. One was a breed champion and the most well-behaved little dog I've ever owned. But the runt of the litter had the best personality. And his full sister put the B in B*tch, the exact opposite in every way. Having the five of them was what convinced me that "breed standards" are anything but. Never seen more varied examples of the same breed.
    I'd rather be thought of as absolutely ridiculous than as absolutely boring.

  7. #67
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    Quote Originally Posted by zaphyre14 View Post
    I think people need to consider WHY they're looking at a specific breed. If it's because of allergies or temperment or to potentially show or breed the animal, then I can see going to a breeder and paying mega-$$$ for one. But it the reason you're only looking at Akitas or Burmese Moutain Dogs is because it looks cool or is the celebrity Pet-Of-The_Month, then maybe you should reconsider. When the movie "101 Dalmations" came out, suddenly every little kid wanted a cute spotted puppy. And six months later, the shelters were full of Dalmations who turned out to be too much dog for the family and were surrendered for bing what they were bred to be: big, happy, excitable, energetic animals.
    I chose Cavs because I wanted a smaller dog that was not too delicate to play with (I grew up with a teacup Poodle - 3 lbs). Cavs have a well sprung chest, so they are not fragile at all. Temperament was critical, because I planned on having children. I researched many appropriate breeds, then saw a photo of a Cav and fell in love with those big dark eyes. That was 32 years ago, they were hard to find then. No celebrities had them because the were not AKC affiliated. The Cavalier King Charles Spaniel Club wanted total control over breeding so that unhealthy dogs were not bred. But, the AKC made it difficult to show Cavs, so the CKCSC and the ACKCSC relented and joined. Since then, they have become very popular and shown up in puppy mills. I now have my 3rd Cav, just because I love the breed. They are pricey, and I did go for a dog (this time) with a grandma who was best in breed (opposite sex) at Westminster. Mine had a slight underbite with his baby teeth, so the breeder let me take him. That and the fact that he was my 3rd Cav. His adult teeth came in perfectly and he has beautiful markings. When the breeder saw him at a year, she told me that if she had known his teeth would be perfect, she'd never have let him go. She wanted me to show and title him, and she wanted to possibly breed him. But, we didn't want to do that. Cooper is a beautiful dog, with a wonderful personality.

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