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  1. #141
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    Quote Originally Posted by *Jen* View Post
    I don't know. "Will you merry me" has a different meaning here at Christmas time...
    This sentence has no meaning to me whatsoever, so....

  2. #142

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    Quote Originally Posted by *Jen* View Post
    I'm not from the American continent, and that's always shocked me too. They are 3 different words. How are you supposed to tell the difference if they're pronounced the same?
    Probably the same way one tells the difference between any sets of homonyms -- context!
    Haunting the Princess of Pink since 20/07/11...

  3. #143
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    How Y’all, Youse and You Guys Talk

    What does the way you speak say about where you’re from? Answer all the questions below to see your personal dialect map.
    I speak exactly like someone who grew up in the area where I grew up. (Near Oakland.)

    I sound the least like someone who grew up in Philadelphia, which is where I lived for three years.

  4. #144
    Official FSU Alte Kacher
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    Solid New England Yankee. Maine is nearly purple.
    "Nothing in all the world is more dangerous than sincere ignorance and conscientious stupidity”– MLK

  5. #145

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    Seattle, Portland and Spokane...makes sense since I live in Alberta...
    Haunting the Princess of Pink since 20/07/11...

  6. #146

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    New York, Yonkers, Newark/Patterson -- all within 25 miles of where I grew up

  7. #147

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    Strong matches in the Midwest, North Dakota and south of it, especially Oklahoma City, Tulsa, and Buffalo NY. Hmm......
    Gone crazy. Be back soon.

  8. #148

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    It got me from the Houston area, which is true... but I don't always like admitting that I'm from Texas. lol

  9. #149
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    The Sound of Philadelphia Fades Out

    Some dialects can be transcribed onto the page, but the Philadelphia accent really has to be heard to be believed. And when an accent goes silent, so do its speakers. A recent study out of the University of Pennsylvania reported that, like many regional phenomena, the Philly sound is conforming more and more with the mainstream of Northern accents.


    At least the piece has

    Sum izzamples of whuddah Filelfian seawns luyk
    like

    Semalem cawfy’s a’ite, but it ain’t Wawa.
    and

    C’I get dat awn a ’tayyin rowll?
    I'm getting nostalgic, complete with a hankering for something from Pat's King of Steaks.

  10. #150
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    I got Winston-Salem, NC, Greensboro, North Carolina, and Jackson, Mississippi on the linguistics map.

    Never set foot in any of them .

    Every linguistics professor who ever heard me speak more than two words has immediately pegged me as raised in southwestern Ohio with a mother from Kentucky and father either from Kentucky or southwestern Ohio, so I think I sound like just what I am anyway.
    "The secret to creativity is knowing how to hide your sources."-- Albert Einstein.

  11. #151
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    Quote Originally Posted by Vagabond View Post
    OMG! I've lived in Philly all my life, and I never sounded like that. Maybe that's because some of my NY relatives' accents have rubbed on on me.

  12. #152

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    What do you call the large piece of furniture in your bedroom, usually featuring many drawers, sometimes of different sizes, into which you place your clothing?

    I swear my mother and I (and probably my sisters) are the ONLY people on the planet who call it a 'bureau.' I figure it's a vestige of her hoity-toity West Hartford (CT) upbringing.
    Quote Originally Posted by JJH View Post
    genevieve, I agree that, where I was raised, the term "pocketbook" would have seemed very old-fashioned, something from a 1930s or 1940s movie.
    This is the other Connecticut-is my mother retains. We'd say "pocketbook" as kids, echoing her, and people (Seattle area by then) looked at us funny.
    Last edited by LilJen; 03-03-2014 at 10:12 PM.
    BARK LESS. WAG MORE.

  13. #153
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    Quote Originally Posted by LilJen View Post
    What do you call the large piece of furniture in your bedroom, usually featuring many drawers, sometimes of different sizes, into which you place your clothing?

    I swear my mother and I (and probably my sisters) are the ONLY people on the planet who call it a 'bureau.' I figure it's a vestige of her hoity-toity West Hartford (CT) upbringing.
    I called it a dresser, my husband calls it a chest of drawers, and I have relatives who say "bureau."

    I always thought that was a country thing . But many "country" things are 18th-century British holdovers.
    "The secret to creativity is knowing how to hide your sources."-- Albert Einstein.

  14. #154

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    Quote Originally Posted by Vagabond View Post
    How Y’all, Youse and You Guys TalkI speak exactly like someone who grew up in the area where I grew up. (Near Oakland.)

    I sound the least like someone who grew up in Philadelphia, which is where I lived for three years.
    Quote Originally Posted by gkelly View Post
    New York, Yonkers, Newark/Patterson -- all within 25 miles of where I grew up
    I just took that quiz and got Philly, Yonkers, and Newark as my triad -- I was born in Newark, spent the first decade of my life less than 40 miles from there, but have lived in the midwest for several decades +. I guess those early learned locutions stick with you (especially if your parents had a smilar history). Mischief night and sneakers live on forever.

    Quote Originally Posted by LilJen View Post
    What do you call the large piece of furniture in your bedroom, usually featuring many drawers, sometimes of different sizes, into which you place your clothing?

    We'd say "pocketbook" as kids, echoing her, and people (Seattle area by then) looked at us funny.
    My mother said "pocket book" for years, finally switched to "purse" (sometimes "handbag" though).

    Quote Originally Posted by Prancer View Post
    I called it a dresser, my husband calls it a chest of drawers, and I have relatives who say "bureau."

    I always thought that was a country thing . But many "country" things are 18th-century British holdovers.
    We used both "dresser" and "chest of drawers" in my family, but they referred to two different pieces of furniture: the "dresser" was the low and wide (with mirror) part of my parents bedroom suite (which held my mother's clothes) and the "chest of drawers" was much taller and narrower and was used by my father.
    Lady 2: there isn't anything about me on goooogle, I mean, I must take it off if there is.....
    Lady 3: The google is a terrible thing, I mean I don't want anything on there! (Overheard by millyskate on a London train.)

  15. #155

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    Pegged me exact, Kentucky with Lexington/Louisville, and oh was eastern Kentucky the darkest part of my map.
    'Life's hard. It's even harder when you're stupid.'--John Wayne

  16. #156

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    Quote Originally Posted by PDilemma View Post
    Okay...I have heard an odd one (to me) from some Minnesota friends. So what does everyone call an elastic band used to hold a pony tail?
    A "hair thing." That is what I call it. I am a Philly native.

    The NYT quiz identified me pretty well. I think "hoagie" is the main clue. However, Philly dialects can be divided into neighborhoods, eg South Philly, Northeast, etc. I don't talk like folks from those neighborhoods, but I hear those accents all the time on the local news programs. And yes, I cannot escape the innate sensation that people with certain accents are less intelligent or something. Perhaps humans are genetically wired to reject others who do not sound the same as they? Perhaps there was an evolutionary benefit to this long ago?

    Prancer and linguists on the Board, you may be familiar with the work of Prof. William Labov. His current research is on the "flat A." (The vowel sound in "ham" that is starting to show up in many other words more and more in widening regions of the USA. Used to be that "camera" and "Miami" were pronounced with a short A. More and more, though, now pronounced with a flat A.)

  17. #157

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    Solidly in the Worcester/Boston/Providence triangle, of course. How could I not be, with "rotary" and "bubbler"?
    Use Yah Blinkah!

  18. #158
    Ma name's Beckeh.
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    I grew up in several different parts of the country so my accent isn't very consistent but in the few times I've taken this survey I've always come up with Jackson, Mississippi as my number one match, which sort of makes sense because my mom's family is from Tuscaloosa, Alabama.

    Does anybody else say '18-wheeler'? I saw a map showing this occurs only around Mississippi and Alabama but now I can't find it.

    Quote Originally Posted by LilJen View Post
    We'd say "pocketbook" as kids, echoing her, and people (Seattle area by then) looked at us funny.
    I carry a purse. A pocketbook is what my grandmother would carry.

    Quote Originally Posted by Prancer View Post
    I called it a dresser, my husband calls it a chest of drawers, and I have relatives who say "bureau."

    I always thought that was a country thing . But many "country" things are 18th-century British holdovers.
    Like skatingfan5, I use dresser for the low, long one and chest of drawers ("chestuhdrorz"--I was probably in high school before I realized this was three words ) for the tall skinny one.

    Quote Originally Posted by Reuven View Post
    There are some parts of VA where "house" sounds like "hoos" rather like some of the Maritime provinces pronounce it, i.e, The "ou" pronounced "oo." CT has its pockets of odd pronunciations. Just below Hartford on I84 is New Bri'an (full glottal stop). I grew up in western CT and I've heard the state name pronounced, "Conne'cut." Now I'm living in ME and that's a whole 'nother thing, Deah.
    I think you're thinking of the Virginia Tidewater accent, though it's more of a 'uhw' than an 'oo'.:

    Quote Originally Posted by wikipedia
    Another traditional feature of the area is the use of /oʊ/ for /aʊ/.[4] For example, words such as "house" and "about" may be heard in the Tidewater area as "həuse" and "abəut" respectively, especially among older speakers.
    I lived in Maryland until I was 10 and I used to say "həuse" though I've lost that pronunciation.

    I normally say 'coke' but 'soda' would be my second choice.

    And, apparantly, I'm one of the few who say 'corter':

    http://spark.rstudio.com/jkatz/Data/comp-40.png

    I spent way too much time on this website. I love linguistics and I might have majored in it if I could have done something with it other than work at McDonald's.
    Roll Tide, y'all!

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