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  1. #61

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    Bostonfan, I've heard route pronounced 3 different ways. Route rhymes with flute. Route rhymes with soot. Route rhymes with about.

  2. #62

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    genevieve, I agree that, where I was raised, the term "pocketbook" would have seemed very old-fashioned, something from a 1930s or 1940s movie.

    How do the pronunciations of ferry and fairy differ?

  3. #63

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    Quote Originally Posted by JJH View Post
    Cloudy_Gumdrops, I would rhyme cot with not. I would rhyme caught with fraught. Caught and fraught have the "aw" sound as in law or saw.
    Thanks, but, I'm still not getting the difference.

    I pronounce every one of those words with the same 'ah' sound.

  4. #64

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    This thread is cracking me up. I keep saying all the words out loud that everyone is talking about 'how can they sound the same' and when I say them out loud .... they sound the same!

    Mary, merry, marry
    ferry, fairy
    cot, caught

    It's all the same when I say them out loud in sentences.

  5. #65

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    Quote Originally Posted by BaileyCatts View Post
    This thread is cracking me up. I keep saying all the words out loud that everyone is talking about 'how can they sound the same' and when I say them out loud .... they sound the same!

    Mary, merry, marry
    ferry, fairy
    cot, caught

    It's all the same when I say them out loud in sentences.
    I'm right there with ya.

  6. #66

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    I have no dignity. I come from an area of the country where we pronounce pin and pen in the same way. My children mock me. Sniffle.
    Last edited by JJH; 06-08-2013 at 10:27 PM.

  7. #67
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    My child mocks me too. I cannot lose the funny Philly pronunciation of the "ng" sound and when I say singer or hanger I get a repeat and a laugh.
    "Youth and vigor is no match for age and deceit." -- Prancer

  8. #68

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    Quote Originally Posted by PRlady View Post
    I knew my ear for Hebrew was getting better when I could hear the Russian, South American and Mizrachi (people whose families are from Arab countries) accents. I could always hear the American accent, which is purely terrible.
    We get our revenge by inflicting the horrid Israeli accent on Americans and other English speakers

    Looking at the maps, I guess I must have picked up even less of an Oregonian dialect/accent than I'd realized, maybe because it's not as distinctive as some regional variations. I also want to add that you could always tell someone is from the east coast if they pronounced it Ori-gone. That is just wrong.
    Last edited by Zemgirl; 06-08-2013 at 03:01 PM.

  9. #69

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    Quote Originally Posted by Cloudy_Gumdrops View Post
    Thanks, but, I'm still not getting the difference.

    I pronounce every one of those words with the same 'ah' sound.
    cot, not, frot, not, bot...all the same to me!

    (still trying to figure out what PRlady means by the Philly 'ng' thing...)
    Haunting the Princess of Pink since 20/07/11...

  10. #70
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    Quote Originally Posted by Really View Post
    cot, not, frot, not, bot...all the same to me!

    (still trying to figure out what PRlady means by the Philly 'ng' thing...)
    Yeesh. If you heard me say it you would know. I guess it would best be written SIN-gger with a very hard g and a glottal (?) stop in the middle. Whatever it is, it is as identifiably Philly as the nasal "o" which I did manage to get rid of, mostly.

    And zemgirl, I like ze Izaraali akzents in Inglish.
    "Youth and vigor is no match for age and deceit." -- Prancer

  11. #71

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    My American family loves Canadianisms. Some of their favorites are "smarten up", when someone is being stupid, "soaker", when you step in a puddle and get a wet foot, "touque", for a knit hat, and "loonie and toonie" for our $1 and $2 coins.

  12. #72

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    Quote Originally Posted by PRlady View Post
    And zemgirl, I like ze Izaraali akzents in Inglish.
    That's either masochism or highly questionable taste

  13. #73
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    Quote Originally Posted by Really View Post

    (still trying to figure out what PRlady means by the Philly 'ng' thing...)
    i have never heard anyone pronounce anything like that

    and that includes PR lady as i would have mocked her if i heard her do it
    I feel like I'm in a dream. But it can't be a dream because there are no boy dancers!

  14. #74
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    The 'ng' thing is a South Philadelphia thing, I believe. As is turning final s into z -- e.g., you put "gaz" in the car. I never inherited either, thankfully.

    For Philadelphians, "merry" is often pronounced like "murray." "Ferry" and "furry" are sometimes homophones (but very different from "fairy," which rhymes with "Mary" to our ears).

    A trained ear can hear PRlady is from Philadelphia -- and the same goes for me, despite equally hard work at losing the accent that allows me to slip by most people. I just can't bear to erase "hoagie" from my vocabulary, though. Some things are too painful.

    The funny exercise is to ask me to read a list of words when sober, and then the same words late at night after several drinks. They'll sound totally different. Things have a funny way of creeping back.

  15. #75
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    As a Philly girl too, I definitely hear it. I don't have the accent at all, it somehow escaped me. But my mother says water like wooder, and ferry like furry all the time. My favorite is legal thymes with bagel.

  16. #76
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    Quote Originally Posted by manleywoman View Post
    As a Philly girl too, I definitely hear it. I don't have the accent at all, it somehow escaped me. But my mother says water like wooder, and ferry like furry all the time. My favorite is legal thymes with bagel.
    I studied this in college and very nearly went into a linguistics Ph.D. program thinking this would be my dissertation topic . The general rule is that you get the Philadelphia accent if both of your parents have it, and you don't get it if only one of your parents has it. The non-Philadelphia accent is almost always dominant.

    That said, there are certain portions of the accent that don't fit the rule. My parents both said "liggal" and "beggal" (they don't quite rhyme), but neither of us picked it up. There are also words like "planet" that show a generational shift -- the older generation tends to say "plah-net", while the younger generation tends to say "plan-et" even in the same household. I actually use both interchangeably; maybe I'm on the cusp.

  17. #77
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    Quote Originally Posted by Louis View Post
    I studied this in college and very nearly went into a linguistics Ph.D. program thinking this would be my dissertation topic . The general rule is that you get the Philadelphia accent if both of your parents have it, and you don't get it if only one of your parents has it. The non-Philadelphia accent is almost always dominant.

    That said, there are certain portions of the accent that don't fit the rule. My parents both said "liggal" and "beggal" (they don't quite rhyme), but neither of us picked it up. There are also words like "planet" that show a generational shift -- the older generation tends to say "plah-net", while the younger generation tends to say "plan-et" even in the same household. I actually use both interchangeably; maybe I'm on the cusp.
    Heh. Both my parents grew up in South Philly and went to South Philly high. Me, I escaped the Northeast Philly Jewish girl accent, an awful sub-dialect if there ever was one, but I've got the "ng" and so do almost all my relatives. (I had "gaz" and worked my way out of it.) I've heard Louis after a couple of drinks and yeah, you can take the boy out of South Philly but....



    By the way, one of the reasons Philly accents attract linguists is that it is probably the most provincial large city in all the U.S. Nobody leaves and nobody moves there, people just stay and stay, so it's like studying people marooned on an island. Escapees like manleywoman, Louis and me are black sheep.
    Last edited by PRlady; 06-08-2013 at 06:39 PM.
    "Youth and vigor is no match for age and deceit." -- Prancer

  18. #78
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    Quote Originally Posted by JJH View Post
    Cloudy_Gumdrops, I would rhyme cot with not. I would rhyme caught with fraught. Caught and fraught have the "aw" sound as in law or saw.
    I love this, because it's exactly like PRLady trying to be helpful earlier: every single one of those words rhymes to me Thank you both for trying to be helpful, though.

  19. #79
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    Quote Originally Posted by PRlady View Post
    And Vagabond, you're in northern California. You mean to tell me all those words sound the same to you as well?
    It depends who's speaking, doesn't it?

    When people who are originally from Northeast Philadelphia or "Lawn Guy Land" are speaking, they sure don't sound the same.
    Last edited by Vagabond; 06-08-2013 at 07:29 PM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Louis View Post
    The general rule is that you get the Philadelphia accent if both of your parents have it, and you don't get it if only one of your parents has it. .
    ah, my father is from someplace else and pulled our ears if we mispronounced words or made grammatical errors

    i'm surprised drawer isnt on the list. nothing sounds worse to me then when (some) people in NJ saw drawer like dra or draw
    I feel like I'm in a dream. But it can't be a dream because there are no boy dancers!

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