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  1. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by PRlady View Post
    Hey, buddy. I've spent 30 years trying to sound like every accent-less newscaster. Maybe I'm Eliza Doolittle and not Henry, but I can ****in' fake it. And if you don't think so I'll knock your teeth out.
    Spoken like a true Philadelphian!

    Quote Originally Posted by milanessa View Post
    That sounds familiar. Was it a BBC series? I'm fairly sure there was an island in there, though.
    http://topdocumentaryfilms.com/story-of-english/

    The Story of English is the title of an Emmy Award winning nine-part television series, and a companion book, both produced in 1986, detailing the development of the English language. A little bit old but very good.

    The book and the television series were written by Robert MacNeil, Robert McCrum and William Cran. The book has been revised twice, once in 1993, and again in 2002.

    The documentary series was directed by William Cran, and originally broadcast on BBC and PBS. It was co-produced by MacNeil-Lehrer Productions and the BBC,

  2. #42
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    Do you have a mic attached to your computer? A lot of them have it built in these days. If you run Windows, then in Star Menu>Accessories there should be 'sound recorder'. You can hit record to see if you have a mic. If you do, you can record a file, save it, then upload it to some place like soundcloud.com.

  3. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by michiruwater View Post
    Do you have a mic attached to your computer? A lot of them have it built in these days. If you run Windows, then in Star Menu>Accessories there should be 'sound recorder'. You can hit record to see if you have a mic. If you do, you can record a file, save it, then upload it to some place like soundcloud.com.
    I just knew there'd be some newfangled way to do this. I do run windows and I don't have a microphone.
    "Youth and vigor is no match for age and deceit." -- Prancer

  4. #44
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    A sunshower = "the Devil is beating his wife" ? Huh? Never would have been able to guess that meaning.

  5. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by michiruwater View Post
    Do you have a mic attached to your computer? A lot of them have it built in these days. If you run Windows, then in Star Menu>Accessories there should be 'sound recorder'. You can hit record to see if you have a mic. If you do, you can record a file, save it, then upload it to some place like soundcloud.com.
    More about Mary, merry, marry: http://dialectblog.com/2011/09/21/marry-merry-mary/ I think the pronunciation guide there in the second paragraph explains the difference well. There's some interesting discussion in the comments section as well.

    And more maps showing more specific differences just for those three: http://www4.uwm.edu/FLL/linguistics/...maps/q_15.html

    Oh, and where is the "cot/caught" map, hmmm?
    Trolling dates all the way back to 397 B.C. - People began following Plato around and would make fart noises after everything he said.

  6. #46
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    Those of us who weren't from the deep south had some fun when we first started doing clinical patient encounters. One of my classmate had to see a patient whose chief complaint was "I done fell out" (meaning that they fainted), and a heated argument followed in which the classmate kept trying to figure out what the patient fell out of.

  7. #47

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    I hear and say Mary, marry, and merry differently and I'm from Louisiana. I know we have this discussion every summer, but I'm always confused as to how anyone can think merry and Mary sound the same.

    Like many people here, my older brother says "somewheres", "anywheres", "nowheres". Drives me up the freaking wall. Drives my older sister up the freaking wall and halfway across the ceiling.
    "The practice of sport is a human right. Every individual must have the possibility of practicing sport, without discrimination of any kind and in the Olympic spirit, which requires mutual understanding with a spirit of friendship, solidarity and fair play." –Olympic Charter

  8. #48
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    Actually, I love the fact that these dialect differences persist. It would be so boring if our speech was uniform. When I'm helping a tourist here (a cottage industry) as soon as they start talking I can get a general sense of where they're from, or at least those from the South, Midwest, Boston, New York and that weird SoCal accent.

    I can't hear Georgia from Louisiana, though, or any of the Midwest distinctions.

    I knew my ear for Hebrew was getting better when I could hear the Russian, South American and Mizrachi (people whose families are from Arab countries) accents. I could always hear the American accent, which is purely terrible.
    "Youth and vigor is no match for age and deceit." -- Prancer

  9. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bostonfan View Post
    A sunshower = "the Devil is beating his wife" ? Huh? Never would have been able to guess that meaning.
    I've heard that expression all my life, but I don't think it's too well known among younger folks.

  10. #50
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    How on earth can there be a different between cot and caught?

  11. #51

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    I think the maps are pretty spot on for the most part. At least for my area anyway.

    I say Caramel three ways.
    1. Car-a-mel 2. Care-a-mel 3. Car-mull

    I personally pronounce Pecan like, Peh-con

  12. #52
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    Both caramel and pecan always make me panic when I realize I have to say them, because I know people say them differently, so I always just pick one when I get to the moment where I have to say one of them and therefore always pronounce them differently This is probably an example of how I overthink things.

  13. #53
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    Quote Originally Posted by Prancer View Post
    More about Mary, merry, marry: http://dialectblog.com/2011/09/21/marry-merry-mary/ I think the pronunciation guide there in the second paragraph explains the difference well. There's some interesting discussion in the comments section as well.
    By the way, if you answered ‘yes’ to the opening question, you may not understand how these three words sound different. In many British (and some American) accents, ‘marry’ (and other ‘-arry’ words) are pronounced with the same vowel in ‘cat;’ ‘merry,’ (and other ‘-erry’ words) are pronounced with the same vowel in ‘pet;’ and ‘mary’ (and other ‘-ary’ words) is pronounced with the same vowel as that found in ‘fair.’
    Well, no. Having lived in Philadelphia, I have to say that the locals have a longer "a" in "marry" than in "cat," and a longer "ĕ" sound in "merry" than in "pet."

    I tried using the audio function for "Mary," "marry," and "merry" in Google Translate and could hear a slight difference, though the accent is a too close to a standard American one to be truly Philadelphia.

  14. #54
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    Quote Originally Posted by BaileyCatts View Post

    Another new one on me when moving to Connecticut was that thing that women carry is called a purse. In CT they called a purse a pocketbook. To me, a pocketbook was your wallet, not your purse.
    Yes,same thing here.your pocketbook is your wallet.

  15. #55

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    Mispronunciation of pecan is a fightin' word here. There's a woman from Virginia (more DC than culturally Southern Virginia) and she learned very quickly how to pronounce that word.

    I notice on the drink menu, a lot of old New Orleanians say "cold drink" or "soft drink" for Coke...errr...soda. Among older African Americans, I hear "red" used a lot. I tend to say Coke or soft drink. What do I actually drink? Sprite. It's confusing, but I'll tell my best friend, "I want a Coke," and she'll know to hand me a Sprite. Won't even think about it.

    Pocketbook/Purse
    No, no, no, you are all WRONG.
    A pocketbook is that horrible, utilitarian thing you take to work or to run not-fun errands. You have one in black and one in brown. Maybe white or beige. It's in the upper end of your budget but justifiable for its practicality.
    A purse is used for generally fun activities, is in bright/fun colors and/or patterns, and can cost in any price range.
    When you're going out on the third date, to the ballet, to somewhere you need to impress, you carry a bag. This is designer, and not from the special room in shops off Canal Street in NYC or the back of the truck parked in front of the Circle K.

    I knew "devil is beating his wife" but only because of FSU. If I never got into skating, I'm pretty sure I'd have gone my entire life without hearing that expression. I'd have never heard of burbler either.
    Last edited by Matryeshka; 06-08-2013 at 05:09 AM.
    "The practice of sport is a human right. Every individual must have the possibility of practicing sport, without discrimination of any kind and in the Olympic spirit, which requires mutual understanding with a spirit of friendship, solidarity and fair play." –Olympic Charter

  16. #56

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    I pronounce Mary, marry and merry with the same vowel sound. All 3 words rhyme with ferry and fairy. Over 30 years ago I was on vacation with my parents in Wales and we couldn't find our way back to our B&B. We asked numerous people how to find ferry street and they always looked completely baffled. I would then spell it out for them: f*e*r*r*y street. Each and every person would then exclaim, "Oh, FERRY street!!" Even the policeman. (They still didn't know where the street was, but at least we were communicating.) Eventually we floundered back to the B&B without directions. So, does the rest of the world pronounce fairy and ferry differently?

  17. #57
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    Quote Originally Posted by michiruwater View Post
    How on earth can there be a different between cot and caught?
    I can understand why some folks are under the false impression that Mary, marry and merry are homonyms, but I don't see how anyone can think cot and caught sound alike

    Quote Originally Posted by Matryeshka View Post
    Pocketbook/Purse
    No, no, no, you are all WRONG.
    A pocketbook is that horrible, utilitarian thing you take to work or to run not-fun errands. You have one in black and one in brown. Maybe white or beige. It's in the upper end of your budget but justifiable for its practicality.
    A pocketbook is what my mom used to have and in addition to the above, is only used by moms.

    Quote Originally Posted by JJH View Post
    I pronounce Mary, marry and merry with the same vowel sound. All 3 words rhyme with ferry and fairy. Over 30 years ago I was on vacation with my parents in Wales and we couldn't find our way back to our B&B. We asked numerous people how to find ferry street and they always looked completely baffled. I would then spell it out for them: f*e*r*r*y street. Each and every person would then exclaim, "Oh, FERRY street!!" Even the policeman. (They still didn't know where the street was, but at least we were communicating.) Eventually we floundered back to the B&B without directions. So, does the rest of the world pronounce fairy and ferry differently?
    oh lordy, yes!!
    Q: Why can't I read the competition threads?
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  18. #58

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    Quote Originally Posted by genevieve View Post
    I can understand why some folks are under the false impression that Mary, marry and merry are homonyms, but I don't see how anyone can think cot and caught sound alike
    Cot and caught sound exactly the same to me.

    Can those of you who pronounce them differently please explain the differences?

  19. #59
    Uncle Dick's Beyotch!
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    Matryeshka, it's "bubbler" or in Boston, "bubblah "

    Is there regionalism to the word "route"? I've always pronounced it "root" but often hear it pronounced like "rout"

  20. #60

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    Cloudy_Gumdrops, I would rhyme cot with not. I would rhyme caught with fraught. Caught and fraught have the "aw" sound as in law or saw.

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