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  1. #81

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    Quote Originally Posted by quartz View Post
    The book that is currently flying off the shelf at my bookstore is the third installment of Sylvia Day's Crossfire series. I read the first 5 pages. It is yet another book about a hot sexy billionaire who likes to hurt women. No clue why I seem to be the only woman in my town who does not find this fascinating. Sigh, I am never a part of the in-crowd.
    The Crossfire books aren't my thing at all and I prefer less affluent heroes in my romance novels, but I think that's a pretty simplistic description. My understanding is that Day's goal was to explore the dynamics of a relationship (at times unhealthy) between two abuse survivors, and the reviews I've read suggest that her books aren't just focused on "a hot sexy billionaire who likes to hurt women".

    BTW, if it's a hot sexy blue collar guy and everything is consensual, is that okay?

  2. #82

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    Like I said, I read the first 5 pages of the 3rd book; just an observation on those few pages, not an in-depth analysis.

  3. #83
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jenny View Post
    But Catherine of Aragon was born 200 years earlier in 1485, and while her parents sponsored explorers, I'm pretty sure that during her childhood no one was bringing back pineapples (on months long voyages no less), and definitely no one was growing them.
    Correcting myself here - apparently Columbus did bring back pineapples on one of his early voyages, and legend has it that one survived, and Ferdinand (Catherine's father) loved it, so it's possible he offered a bite to his young daughter. But there's no way they grew them or she had them regularly, as cultivation was still more than two centuries away.

  4. #84
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    Finished "Yes, Chef" by Marcus Samuelsson, and "A Tale for the Time Being". Wouldn't recommend either for different reasons.

    Marcus seems to be a very private man who decided to write his autobiography. It's very dispassionate and you come away frustrated that the real story seems to be better than he gives. So much is just tiny throwaway chapters - if I had to do a food comparison, it would be like getting dim sum and wanting a buffet instead. Even the 'food porn' is lacking.

    A Tale meanwhile had an interesting premise, but then got way too clever. Very dense, very wordy, and too much shifting between stories. When the author inserted herself into a dream and time traveled to Japan to intercede in a past even, I sort of gave up and just tried to finish it. Most of the time I was just skimming and thinking I was an idiot while she rambled on about quantum physics and zen and Eocene art, and Japanese letters translated into French.

  5. #85
    ridin my horse named Bob
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    "The Rackateer" by John Grisham was fun and clever. Much more fun than the "organizing for creative people" book I've been reading for ages...and finally decided th bst solution for this creative person is simply to throw everything away! Also still slogging through "The 70's"-I was too busy living them to understand them and it's been a real eye-opener what all was going on and the ultimate effect it had on my life.

  6. #86

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    "Slogging through" is probably a good expression for the way I got through the Marie Antoinette biography...took me nearly 4 weeks, even reading it pretty much every day, which is insane. Normally I finish a book in a day or two, or maybe a week if it's a long book or I'm busy. Anyway, it did get better as the book went on, but it was still waaaayyyy too detailed and slow-moving. So I'm happy it's finally done and I can move on to something lighter.

    Next up is The History of Us by Leah Stewart, which is for a book club I'm planning to join. I guess I'll get a sense from this one what type of books the club picks. And for that matter whether I even like being in a book club.

  7. #87
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    "Team of Rivals" finally came in at the library. It's MASSIVE!

  8. #88
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    I've just been reading that Erik Larson's (Devil in the White City, In the Garden of Beasts) next book is about the sinking of the Lusitania. It will be released in 2015, the 100th anniversary of the event. I think I've read all his books and have loved every one.

  9. #89
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    Just finished Craig Johnson's latest Longmire series. It was one of his better books. Now, I wish I'd gone to his book signing a couple of months ago because I'd like to ask him a couple of questions.

    Taylor Steven's Vanessa Munroe's latest is up next. Vanessa is a fascinating character. The first book is about a religious cult. This is the 3rd in the series and is supposed to be about the human trafficking. Stevens was in a cult as a child and managed to break free when she was a teenager.

    I also finished Carolyn Haines latest Sarah Booth Delaney. I'm annoyed with Ms. Haines. She's lost the essence of Sarah Booth in the last few novels as well as the deep south from which she hails. She's a freaking writing teacher which just goes to show those who teach aren't always able to follow their own lessons. She's churning out books to please her publisher and needs to seriously evaluate the quality of her efforts.
    Adelina Sotnikova defeated the curse of Esta She is indeed the Greatest Of All Time!

  10. #90
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    Quote Originally Posted by Grannyfan View Post
    I've just been reading that Erik Larson's (Devil in the White City, In the Garden of Beasts) next book is about the sinking of the Lusitania. It will be released in 2015, the 100th anniversary of the event. I think I've read all his books and have loved every one.
    I love shipwrecks!

  11. #91
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    Read "A Thousand Pardons" tonight. Very slim book. Very unbelievable. Very sparse. Very rushed. Very forgettable.

  12. #92
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    Just finished Tony Danza's I'd Like to Apologize to Every Teacher I Ever Had: My Year as a Rookie Teacher at Northeast High. There were a couple of places where I , but for the most part, I liked it very much. I watched Teach and quite liked it, too, and was rather amazed at how real it was, given the restraints of the format. Apparently that reality was not appreciated by A&E; according to the book, they wanted more drama and wanted to soft script episodes (soft scripting means that the production team sets up situations and then lets the cameras roll while the stories play out) because the show was boring, but Danza refused--and good for him if that's the case because he dealt with some kids whose lives were already too full of drama.

    I thought he did a good job of capturing why teachers get so wrapped up in the job (you really have no choice, even if you hate the kids), why teachers nearly always love the kids even though they are sometimes really unloveable, why it's so hard to get anything done and just how frustrating and difficult it can be but why you still do it because the rush you get from seeing an idea take hold is like nothing else. I will say, though, that I am kind of biased in his favor because we have a lot of same classroom-related flaws. My, does he like his anecdotes. I'm glad the website is still up; it was nice to go back and see the pictures of the kids; I remembered a lot of names, but not many faces.

    Next up is How to be a Woman by Caitlin Moran, which has been advertised to me as so sharp I will bleed and full of language that will make me wince.
    Trolling dates all the way back to 397 B.C. - People began following Plato around and would make fart noises after everything he said.

  13. #93

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    Wheel of Time question. Finished reading the first three books and really enjoyed them, but it seems the rest of them weren't as good from what I've seen posted here and on other boards. Should I just skip to the last book?

  14. #94

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    I'm reading Fortune's Children about the rise and fall of the Vanderbilt family. Lots of interesting things about the family dynamics and the epic competition among them for the biggest and best mansions.
    Two things are infinite: the universe and human stupidity, and I'm not sure about the universe.

  15. #95

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    I'm into historical mysteries at the moment and have finished the Catherine LeVendeur medievals that I've found - the conflicts between Christians and Jews form the hearts of the plots and are an aspect I hadn't really considered. As a change of pace, I've started Margaret Lawrence's Hannah Trevor serier, set in Maine in 1785. The first "Heart and Bones" introduces Hannah, a midwife who lost her husband and children during the Revolution and now lives with her deaf daughter and Aunt Julia in a small town rife with tensions. One of the town's richer men is attracted to Hannah, his partner is a money-grubbing land speculator with a wife who is one of Hannah's strongest detractors and a huge gossip. I'm barely 50 pages in and already hugely invested in the characters.
    "You just can't underestimate the power of positive underwear." 2013 Fruit of the Loom ad

  16. #96
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    Heard about "The Astronaut Wives Club" on NPR this morning. Sounds fascinating. Once my library gets it in, I'll be reading it.

    Just read "Small Sacrifices" about Diane Downs, a woman who shot her 3 children in the 80's and blamed it on a 'bushy haired man'. Older story, but very harrowing and well written. I'm not normally into 'true crime' books, but this was a good one. Sad to think that this was considered shocking, but so common these days.

    Next up to 're-read' on library loan is Harry Potter 4. I may be skipping chunks of it...

    While waiting for George RR Martin to write another GOT book I've bought "The Iron King" which was among his inspirations. Looks like my perfect book -Iron kings and strangled queens, battles and betrayals, lies and lust, the curse of the Templars, the doom of a great dynasty - and all of it (well, most of it) straight from the pages of history, and believe me, the Starks and the Lannisters have nothing on the Capets and Plantagenets.

  17. #97
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    Quote Originally Posted by ioana View Post
    Wheel of Time question. Finished reading the first three books and really enjoyed them, but it seems the rest of them weren't as good from what I've seen posted here and on other boards. Should I just skip to the last book?
    I've read the entire series twice. The only book that I skimmed and skimmed on the first reading was Crossroads of Twilight. All the later books that Jordan wrote suffer from a lack of editor, but at the same time, there is just so much lovely detail and entanglement that I loved it during the re-read. Knife of Dreams really brought back the "Moment of Awesome".

    But- The Gathering Storm co-written by Brandon Sanderson was by far my favourite of the series. And the final books were very satisfying.

    I had to consult the wiki (carefully) to keep track of the more than 1800 named characters!
    ‎"You emerge victorious from the maze you've been travelling in." Oct 21,2012- Best Fortune Cookie Ever!

  18. #98
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    Not Winston Churchill's The Gathering Storm, I take it.
    "Nature is a damp, inconvenient sort of place where birds and animals wander about uncooked."

    from Speedy Death

  19. #99
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    I own that one too, but I've never read it. It just sits on my library shelf mocking me while I read my SF novels...
    ‎"You emerge victorious from the maze you've been travelling in." Oct 21,2012- Best Fortune Cookie Ever!

  20. #100

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    I have been reading the Cork O'Connor series by William Kent Krueger. I love series and the chance to really get to know the characters and I feel this author does a very good job of character development. The first book of his I read is, I believe, a stand alone book that came highly recommended by audible called "Ordinary Grace". That book is written from the perspective of a small town teen age boy and his take on a harrowing summer that includes numerous deaths and a suicide. His series - featuring a small town sheriff named Cork O'Connor takes place in northern Minnesota. Growing up just north of there in Canada, I can really relate to the geography with it's numerous beautiful lakes, freezing cold winters, and hardy citizens. I also like the fact that his heros are neither super - nor terribly flawed - some aspects of both. The author has an obvious love of the local native population and his "hero" is part Annisanabe. There is a spiritual tone through the books - sort of a combination of Native spirituality and more traditional religion that may be off putting to some people. I also like the fact that although he champions the first nation people, no group is all good or all bad. All in all, I am enjoying his books.
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