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  1. #221
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    I listened to Gaiman read his 'The Graveyard Book' during the drive to Phoenix. He did a remarkable job.

  2. #222
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    I absolutely loved Anansi Boys and American Gods, and a recent book club pick was Good Omens (co-written with Terry Pratchett -- their writing styles are highly complementary, I hope they do another joint book). And "The Doctor's Wife" is one of my top 10 fave Doctor Who eps ever.

    When I was placing the library hold for Ocean I noticed that there's another new book by him just out: Make Good Art. It's a graphic novel treatment of the now-famous commencement address he gave to Philadelphia’s University of the Arts in 2012. So ... I put a hold on that one too (still "on order" at my library, but I'm #1 in the queue).

  3. #223
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    I just started And the Mountains Echoed. I decided to set aside What Maisie Knew for the time being.
    "Ever tried. Ever failed. No matter. Try Again. Fail again. Fail better." -- Samuel Beckett

  4. #224

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    The only Gaimen book I've read is "Good Omens" and while I didn't hate it, I had a very hard time finishing it. Are his others better or just more of the same quirkiness?

    I have Margaret Lawrence's "The Burning Bride" waiting for me for the long weekend.
    "You just can't underestimate the power of positive underwear." 2013 Fruit of the Loom ad

  5. #225
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    After watching the BBC mini-series North and South for the third time last month, I decided it was time to read the book. It took just a bit for my mind's ear to adjust to the syntax (I hope that's the correct word) of the writing, but now that it has, I find I'm really enjoying all the "bits" I missed in the TV production.
    If this is to end in fire
    Then we will all burn together

  6. #226
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    Started reading "Divergent" last night around 9:30. Forced myself to go to bed at 1:00. I think I'm hooked.

  7. #227
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    Quote Originally Posted by dbell1 View Post
    Started reading "Divergent" last night around 9:30. Forced myself to go to bed at 1:00. I think I'm hooked.
    I liked most of Divergent very much, tho the romance storyline was pretty eye-rolling for a non-teen reader. Insurgent (the 2nd in the trilogy) was a huge disappointment, not quite awful but almost.

    I'll probably read the 3rd one when it comes out in the fall, just to finish the story, but I can't say I'm too excited about it.

  8. #228
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    Quote Originally Posted by zaphyre14 View Post
    The only Gaimen book I've read is "Good Omens" and while I didn't hate it, I had a very hard time finishing it. Are his others better or just more of the same quirkiness?
    The quirkiness in Good Omens I attribute more to Terry Pratchett -- his writing style tends toward the OTT goofball & Pythonesque. I personally enjoy that style but it's what I grew up on, and I know it's not for everyone. Gaimen is more witty than quirky(or, in the case of his younger audience stuff, whimsical), IMO.

  9. #229
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    Woot woot, I'm first in the library queue for 4 highly anticipated fall books: Maddaddam (Margaret Atwood -- 3rd book in the Oryx and Crake trilogy, Aug 27), The Orenda (Joseph Boyden, Sept 10), Bridget Jones: Mad About the Boy (Oct 15), and Just One Evil Act (Elizabeth George, Oct 15).

    The last couple of Elizabeth Georges have been pretty disappointing, but the new one promises to be Barbara-centric so I'm particularly looking forward to that.

  10. #230

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    Quote Originally Posted by Nan View Post
    After watching the BBC mini-series North and South for the third time last month, I decided it was time to read the book. It took just a bit for my mind's ear to adjust to the syntax (I hope that's the correct word) of the writing, but now that it has, I find I'm really enjoying all the "bits" I missed in the TV production.
    That's my favorite mini-series. I have the book on my shelves, but I've not read it yet.

    I'm currently reading The Other Boleyn Girl, not bad so far. It's holding my attention, and I know to take Philippa Gregory's "history" with a huge grain of salt.

  11. #231

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    I am nearly done with the first Game of Thrones book and went and purchased the next 3. I am heading off for a week at my parents place out in the middle of no where with a beautiful pool and view of the pond (that they call a lake, but I digress). I brought the next 2 in the series with me although I seriously doubt I get through one of them as thick as they are. But, just in case. I told myself NO MORE BOOKS. I have 3 or 4 sitting somewhere that I never even picked up.
    -Brian
    "Michelle would never be caught with sausage grease staining her Vera Wang." - rfisher

  12. #232
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    Quote Originally Posted by ChelleC View Post
    That's my favorite mini-series. I have the book on my shelves, but I've not read it yet.

    I'm currently reading The Other Boleyn Girl, not bad so far. It's holding my attention, and I know to take Philippa Gregory's "history" with a huge grain of salt.
    That and The Queen's Fool were her best books IMO - much more researched, well developed characters, interesting historic details, compelling storytelling. After that she got lazy IMO and just started churning them out.

  13. #233

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    Quote Originally Posted by Artemis@BC View Post
    I liked most of Divergent very much, tho the romance storyline was pretty eye-rolling for a non-teen reader. Insurgent (the 2nd in the trilogy) was a huge disappointment, not quite awful but almost.

    I'll probably read the 3rd one when it comes out in the fall, just to finish the story, but I can't say I'm too excited about it.
    That's too bad. I also read Divergent over the weekend and couldn't put it down. I hadn't bought the second book yet, but I was intending to.

    Right now I'm reading the 8th book in Jennifer Estep's Elemental Assassin series - I know I've missed a couple of books (book six and seven), but the 1.99 Nook price was too good to resist. I always enjoy this series, but not enough to make it a purchase at full price.

  14. #234

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    Quote Originally Posted by Artemis@BC View Post
    The quirkiness in Good Omens I attribute more to Terry Pratchett -- his writing style tends toward the OTT goofball & Pythonesque. I personally enjoy that style but it's what I grew up on, and I know it's not for everyone. Gaimen is more witty than quirky(or, in the case of his younger audience stuff, whimsical), IMO.
    Agreed.
    Gaiman's solo works are not nearly as slapstick as "Good Omens". If I had to pick one word to describe his writing, I would say "enchanting".

  15. #235
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    Finished Divergent at lunch today. It seemed really rushed in the final 20% of the book. Things happened and I kept going "wha?!?" and went to check to see if I skipped pages. Just Kindled book 2. An e-library loan would take about 3 months and my regular library is 2 months out.

    Found out today that my library is closed 'until further notice' because of a gas leak. That explains why the books I reserved (that were on the shelf) are still showing as 'unavailable for pickup'. I might have to break into my 'read this shelf of stuff next' piles...

  16. #236
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    Quote Originally Posted by dbell1 View Post
    Finished Divergent at lunch today. It seemed really rushed in the final 20% of the book. Things happened and I kept going "wha?!?" and went to check to see if I skipped pages. Just Kindled book 2. An e-library loan would take about 3 months and my regular library is 2 months out.

    Found out today that my library is closed 'until further notice' because of a gas leak. That explains why the books I reserved (that were on the shelf) are still showing as 'unavailable for pickup'. I might have to break into my 'read this shelf of stuff next' piles...
    If you have a Salvation Army store anywhere nearby, they still sell books for cheap, cheap. Anyway mine does - paperbacks 4/$1.00, hardcover 3/$2.00. Bibles are free and every child gets a book for free. I like my Salvation Army Store.

  17. #237

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    I finished Mary Hocking's Good Daughters this morning. It was very good, but ended on a somewhat unexpected dark note. Hocking did an excellent job of depicting the lives of a London minister's family 1933-36; I was a little surprised that even in 1933, there were "ordinary people" who could see WWII coming. The period details were perfect, and I liked how much of the story was seen through the eyes of Hocking's 12-to-15-year-old-self, trying to come to grips with adolescence, family, school, society; dimly aware of the threat of war, but all the other issues seem to loom large as well. I'm looking forward to the next volume in the trilogy, Indifferent Heroes.
    My job requires me to be a juggler, but that does not mean that I enjoy working with clowns.

  18. #238
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    During my vacation I read:

    JCO The Gravedigger's Daughter another JCO I didn't like although it was as atrociously bad as that figure skating book. The writing was stilted and almost Ayn Rand-like in its melodrama and humorlessness. Yes, like most her work, it dealt with violence and tragedy but still. Rebecca's character occupied the main stage almost constantly and yet managed to stay one-dimensional and uninteresting. The men were of four kinds: murderer, serial murderer, rapist/murderer and sensitive hippie. Oh and a boy piano prodigy. Not her best IMO.


    Next I read Maugham's The Painted Veil and was surprised how different from the movie with Naomi Watts and Edward Norton it was. Especially after the unfortunate JCO, Maugham's prose flowed effortlessly. There were central aspects that lacked verisimilitude but overall, a beautiful work, if not in terms of plot, then in the quality of the prose.

    Now I am on Murakami's Hard-boiled Wonderland and the End of the World, a change of pace, to say the least. I am under a 100 pages in and am intrigued.
    "Nature is a damp, inconvenient sort of place where birds and animals wander about uncooked."

    from Speedy Death

  19. #239
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    I finished And the Mountains Echoed and was a little disappointed. There was one whole story line that seemed totally superfluous, and the whole story was really anti-climactic. I really enjoyed the first two-thirds of the book and then it seemed like he didn't know where to go so it just got sloppy. Next up is The Birth House. A girl at work LOVES it and talked it up pretty good, lol.
    "Ever tried. Ever failed. No matter. Try Again. Fail again. Fail better." -- Samuel Beckett

  20. #240
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    Last night I remembered that I had started Dickens' Bleak House before I left for vacation. As it goes so well with the bleak San Francisco weather, I took a break from the cyberwars of Murakami and read a few chapters.

    Well, I'll be darned!! I like this a lot, the humor, the sarcasm, the snark! Wileyfan would be proud--I stayed up until well past 1 am to read it. I like it! And I've grown up with the notion that Dickens is a dreadful bore. Go figure.
    "Nature is a damp, inconvenient sort of place where birds and animals wander about uncooked."

    from Speedy Death

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