Results 1 to 8 of 8
  1. #1

    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Posts
    5,338
    vCash
    500
    Rep Power
    46638

    Mao certain to face massive pressure if she tries to retire

    New article entitled 'Mao certain to face massive pressure if she tries to retire'. Reads:-

    Mao Asada’s recent proclamation at the World Team Trophy that she “intends” to retire after next year’s Sochi Olympics took many by surprise, but I think the proclamation is far from set in stone.

    These were the words of an athlete who was completely exhausted after another long season and has been competing nonstop for nearly a decade. It is understandable that after so many years in the sport, the two-time world champion would be contemplating getting out, but a closer examination of the issues shows that it may not be so easy.

    First off, consider that Mao is practically a walking conglomerate. She has so many sponsors that one can hardly go a day without seeing her face on television, in the trains, newspapers or magazines. Whenever she skates, the TV ratings are exponentially higher than normal.

    Since bursting on the international scene as a precocious 15-year-old with her victory in the 2005 Grand Prix Final, Mao has nearly single-handedly carried the entire skating industry in Japan. While the comparison may not be precise, the impact Tiger Woods has had on golf could be equated with what Mao has done for her sport in this country.

    When taking all of the aforementioned into account, in addition to convincing herself that retiring is the right move, Mao will also have to persuade her sponsors, representatives, the media and fans.

    This is where it gets complicated. By quitting skating, Mao would no doubt be impacted financially as her value to sponsors will drop significantly if she is not competing. She would certainly not lack for opportunities going forward, but one has to wonder if they would approach the level they are currently at.

    influence will likely be exerted upon Mao by the Japan Skating Federation, as the business end of her retirement would no doubt hit it hard financially. If Mao bows out, there will be a huge void left behind.

    But Mao will only be 23 when next season ends, which means she could considerably skate several more years, including all the way to the 2018 Pyeongchang Olympics, before hanging it up. With her physique and technique, Mao could easily compete for five more years.
    Personally, I think Mao should be just left alone to make up her own mind in her own time. There is more to life than money and she should certainly not be pressured in to staying on simply because others will lose out financially.

  2. #2

    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Oz
    Posts
    2,547
    vCash
    400
    Rep Power
    6051
    I think so too Maofan7. She has been skating a long time, and for some people, whilst they love skating, is not the only thing they want to do forever. I can understand that the Japanese public would love to see her continue as she is one whom they can depend on to medal. But with the depth in the Japanese field, I am sure sooner or later, another young talented skater will fill the gap.
    Prosperity makes friends, adversity tries them. – Publilius Syrus

  3. #3

    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Location
    Vancouver Canada
    Age
    55
    Posts
    12,525
    vCash
    500
    Rep Power
    4753
    Mao has the strength and independence of mind to make and stick to her own decisions. If she decides to quit competing and loses sponsors, I'm sure she'll be just fine. She must have enough money to quit competing if she wants to, and she will certainly be a headliner in shows.

  4. #4
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    663
    vCash
    500
    Rep Power
    0
    Can you imagine the feeling of being in bondage to something you love? Mao is a competitor who seems to love to skate AND compete. Having to do it when you dont want too though would be tough. I hope that even if she does not retire that she at least takes a season away from competition. If she does that, her fame will quadruple when she returns lol. Everyone deserves a break though; especially my Mao!

  5. #5

    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Posts
    4,332
    vCash
    500
    Rep Power
    1825
    10 years is such a long time to be at the top of a sport like skating, I agree she has given more than can be expected of an athlete, and should retire when she is ready.

    I have a question about 'singlehandedly' carrying the sport in the country: Is Japan like the US where ladies is much more popular to the casual fan? I get the impression Daisuke and Yuzuru are hugely popular too, is Mao far more recognized then they are?

  6. #6

    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Posts
    12,865
    vCash
    500
    Rep Power
    15965
    Mao should do whatever she feels is best for her,
    I appreciate the "societal expectations" in the Japanese culture.
    However, if her heart is no longer in skating; the result would likely not meet what the country "desires" if she were to continue.

  7. #7

    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Sending positive thoughts to Mirai..
    Posts
    3,684
    vCash
    500
    Rep Power
    7566
    I doubt Mao will lose sponsors should she retire. She's just too popular. I'm sure she'll keep right on endorsing products, and performing in shows. I hope she decides to do what is best for her and not allow anyone to influence her. She's had a great career. Personally I hope she continues-but if she doesn't want to that's fine too.

  8. #8
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Posts
    1,214
    vCash
    500
    Rep Power
    0
    It's too bad that that the Japanese Jr skaters aren't stronger and couldn't realistically come close to filling the void if Mao was to leave. She's been at the top for quite a while now, and she must feel some extra pressure being a Japanese icon. She also seems so heavily reliant on such a difficult jump (3A), which has to add stress and perhaps some extra strain on the body. I think if she had a relatively reliable 3-3 instead, things might be simpler. Aside from her jumping technique, after being an Olympic gold threat for 2 quadrenniums and having multiple world titles, retirement is understandable even if she's not old for a ladies skater. She of course has achieved everything except Olympic gold (she still may win next year, you never know). But it will be difficult for a lot of the sponsors/fans/etc to accept, especially considering there is nobody close to her level yet coming up behind her.
    Last edited by stjeaskategym; 04-26-2013 at 03:52 AM.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •