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  1. #1
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    Anyone wear Gas Permeable contacts?

    I just got new gas permeable contacts yesterday, and man, are they a pain to adapt to. I am told the edge sensation and shifting will settle down with time, but two days into it, am skeptical.

    About how long does it take to adapt? The vision is sharp enough for me to notice dust in places where I hadn't before, and though it feels like I have two hard pieces of plastic in my eyes (duh), my eyes aren't blood red and bruised feeling when removed, like with soft contacts.

  2. #2
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    I went from hard lenses, which at the beginning took almost two weeks for the corneas to adapt to them -- wearing them for an hour the first day and gradually increasing wear time -- and for them to settle and not shift when I blinked, to gas permeable lenses, which I found much more comfortable, as soon as they became available. I can imagine they're more difficult to adjust to coming from soft lenses, which mold themselves to the eye, apart from the ease of getting them in and especially out.

    I think a week is the minimum it would take them to settle. Unless they're painful or impossibly uncomfortable, I'd give it more time.
    "The team doesn't get automatic capacity because management is mad" -- Greg Smith, agile guy

  3. #3
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    Thanks. I am going on hour 4 now, and the goal today was 5-6. I think the six will happen. Getting used to them at work should be easy, since it's too hectic to constantly think about having something on my eye. To add insult to injury, my new glasses are progressives, which require an adaptation period, too. The glasses are getting much better, though.

  4. #4
    I <3 Kozuka
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    I remember learning to use hard lenses: I had to blink a lot because no gasses permeated them, and I had to keep my eyes from drying out, but every time I blinked, I went back to blurriness until the lenses settled, and then it was time to blink again I was 14 at the time, though, and 14-year-olds can suffer anything to give up glasses.
    "The team doesn't get automatic capacity because management is mad" -- Greg Smith, agile guy

  5. #5
    Bountifully Enmeshed
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    Quote Originally Posted by leesaleesa View Post
    About how long does it take to adapt?
    That depends to some degree on your scrip. If you need a lot of correction, the lens will be thicker and it will take longer. Most people find the lenses comfortable in about two weeks

    You feel the contact on the inside of your eyelids, which are very sensitive, until the eyelids adjust. If your eyes are dry, it's worse. Eyedrops help.

    If they are still driving you crazy in a week or so, you may need to try a different kind. Most people are fitted a couple of times before they hit on the right brand/fit.
    "The secret to creativity is knowing how to hide your sources."-- Albert Einstein.

  6. #6
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    That depends to some degree on your scrip. If you need a lot of correction, the lens will be thicker and it will take longer.
    -6.25 and -6.00. I guess I'm in for a long two weeks or more. The good news is that once they come out, I don't have the irritation, dryness, and redness that soft lenses cause.

  7. #7
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    You get so much more oxygen to the eyes and tears under the lenses with gas permeable. I'd still be wearing them if one of my eyes stopped changing prescriptions every two weeks. It's easier for that eye to adjust to glasses.
    "The team doesn't get automatic capacity because management is mad" -- Greg Smith, agile guy

  8. #8

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    I have been wearing gas permeable lenses for 30 years. Can't remember having too many problems getting used to them, I think it was about a week or two of gradually increased wearing times to work up to all day wear. I have pretty extreme astigmatism which has been greatly corrected through the years. Soft lenses have never been an option. I do have to carry eye drops with me as my eyes get dry and tired throughout the day and I have to throw a couple drops in every now and then. But I have never had any big problems with them.

  9. #9

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    kwanfan1818,

    I am confused when you say you went from hard lenses to gas permeable. I wear hard lenses that ARE gas permeable. Am I missing something here?

  10. #10
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    Before there were the gas-permeable type of hard lenses, they were non-permeable lenses. You couldn't sleep in them, and weren't even supposed to snooze in them, because they prevented oxygen from reaching the cornea. I remember dozing off and waking up a couple of hours later, and I thought I had scratched my eyes. I think I once accidentally slept in my gas-permeable lenses, and I know I snoozed in them, but whenever I woke up, I was fine.
    "The team doesn't get automatic capacity because management is mad" -- Greg Smith, agile guy

  11. #11
    Sexy Superhero
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    I'm with kwanfan1818. The old hard contact lens were much more uncomfortable than the gas permeable. Vanity is a powerful thing to make you endure those old-style contact lens. Especially when the dust storms blew and you got a speck of dust underneath them.

  12. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rogue View Post
    Especially when the dust storms blew and you got a speck of dust underneath them.
    that is awful. So painful. I got my first pair of hard contact lenses in 1975 and changed to gas permeable lenses maybe 10 years later when they came out. I remember with the original hard lenses that when I woke in the morning I could see pretty clearly even though the lenses had been out all night because the eyeball had been moulded into the lens shape.

    I've not really had a problem with either (apart from the grit-under-the-lens thing). It may be worth getting another check on the fit of the lens if they float around and you are still conscious of it, and I didn't get the edge issue at all. I did once try the soft contact lenses and could feel the edges, but find the hard ones fine. Maybe because they're smaller?
    'The one. The only. Daisuke Takahashi ' Chris Howarth, EurosportUK

  13. #13

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    I wish you luck, I never could adapt to gas permeable lenses. I could only ever keep them in for around 6 hours max. I don't know if my hay fever type allergies caused more problems or not. I was thrilled when they came up with the soft toric lenses and I was able to switch to those. I had absolutely no problems with them. I know that the hard ones are supposed to have crisper vision, but to be honest I couldn't tell any difference between the hard and soft because my eyes were always so irritated and tearing up from the hard ones.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by NancyNC View Post
    I wish you luck, I never could adapt to gas permeable lenses. I could only ever keep them in for around 6 hours max. I don't know if my hay fever type allergies caused more problems or not. I was thrilled when they came up with the soft toric lenses and I was able to switch to those. I had absolutely no problems with them. I know that the hard ones are supposed to have crisper vision, but to be honest I couldn't tell any difference between the hard and soft because my eyes were always so irritated and tearing up from the hard ones.
    I am severely nearsighted and have been told that gas perm lenses may give me sharper vision. My optometrist, however, with the agreement of my ophthalmologist, thinks that because I have bad seasonal allergies that affect my eyes and have had allergic reactions to contact solutions/cleaning products, soft disposable lenses are always going to be more comfortable. The problem is that I am pretty close to "sighting out" of available soft lenses.

  15. #15
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    I wore gas permeable lenses in the 80's. I remember it taking a week or so to get used to them. Definitely sharper vision, but my eyes would seriously water in the sun, and several times, one of the lenses popped out when someone simply brushed against my face. This once happened while getting my hair cut while in the Army! Don't miss them at all. Prefer the less sharper, but much more comfortable soft lenses that don't pop out.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by kwanfan1818 View Post
    I remember learning to use hard lenses: I had to blink a lot because no gasses permeated them, and I had to keep my eyes from drying out, but every time I blinked, I went back to blurriness until the lenses settled, and then it was time to blink again I was 14 at the time, though, and 14-year-olds can suffer anything to give up glasses.
    Not me! I went back to glasses before I got to high school and never looked back. Because I was having exactly the problems you had, with soft contacts, hard contacts, gas permeables...whatever was available, I tried in middle school and NEVER got used to it.

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Anita18 View Post
    Not me! I went back to glasses before I got to high school and never looked back. Because I was having exactly the problems you had, with soft contacts, hard contacts, gas permeables...whatever was available, I tried in middle school and NEVER got used to it.
    Seriously, consider trying again. The problem was likely a bad fit. Some optometrists are not good at fitting lenses particularly those at discount centers. And regardless of what kind of lenses you wear, your vision is better, eyestrain is less, and studies now indicate that wearing contacts, for some people, will help stabilize the cornea preventing vision from declining more.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by PDilemma View Post
    Seriously, consider trying again. The problem was likely a bad fit. Some optometrists are not good at fitting lenses particularly those at discount centers. And regardless of what kind of lenses you wear, your vision is better, eyestrain is less, and studies now indicate that wearing contacts, for some people, will help stabilize the cornea preventing vision from declining more.
    My prescription actually hasn't changed since high school, so I think it has stabilized until it declines from old age.

    I'm just so lazy. Plus my new logo has my glasses in it, so now they're part of m brand identity!

    I also elected to go with glasses for my wedding, because I look EXACTLY like my mother without my glasses, and I was sure I'd look through the pics later and think, "Why is Alf marrying my mother?!"

  19. #19
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    I've had gas permeable contacts for over 25 years. I still wear them 18 hrs a day regularly & have slept wearing them several times. I agree with duane they provide better vision than the short contact options. My only problem with them is driving long distances at night, & driving at night when it's raining. The glare gets pretty bad during those times & it's better to put on the old glasses.

  20. #20
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    I have GP lenses and I have been wearing them since the summer of 1991. I can't wear them as much as I used to, but I still wear them at least 14 hours a day--every day. You do get used to them after about 2 weeks, but they never feel great. However, in the long run they are cheaper than soft/disposable lenses and they give you very crisp vision. And they did save me from losing my vision--I've only lost about 2 diopters since I got them (but I'm still a -12 in my glasses.)

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