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  1. #1

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    New Test for Computers: Grading Essays at College Level

    Imagine taking a college exam, and, instead of handing in a blue book and getting a grade from a professor a few weeks later, clicking the “send” button when you are done and receiving a grade back instantly, your essay scored by a software program.

    And then, instead of being done with that exam, imagine that the system would immediately let you rewrite the test to try to improve your grade.

    EdX, the nonprofit enterprise founded by Harvard and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology to offer courses on the Internet, has just introduced such a system and will make its automated software available free on the Web to any institution that wants to use it. The software uses artificial intelligence to grade student essays and short written answers, freeing professors for other tasks.

    The new service will bring the educational consortium into a growing conflict over the role of automation in education. Although automated grading systems for multiple-choice and true-false tests are now widespread, the use of artificial intelligence technology to grade essay answers has not yet received widespread endorsement by educators and has many critics.

    ...

    The EdX assessment tool requires human teachers, or graders, to first grade 100 essays or essay questions. The system then uses a variety of machine-learning techniques to train itself to be able to grade any number of essay or answers automatically and almost instantaneously.

    ...

    Two start-ups, Coursera and Udacity, recently founded by Stanford faculty members to create massively open online courses, or MOOCs, are also committed to automated assessment systems because of the value of instant feedback.

    “It allows students to get immediate feedback on their work, so that learning turns into a game, with students naturally gravitating toward resubmitting the work until they get it right,” said Daphne Koller, a computer scientist and a founder of Coursera.

    ...

    Mark D. Shermis, a professor at the University of Akron in Ohio, supervised the Hewlett Foundation’s contest on automated essay scoring and wrote a paper about the experiment. In his view, the technology — though imperfect — has a place in educational settings.

    With increasingly large class sizes, it is impossible for most teachers to give students meaningful feedback on writing assignments, he said. Plus, he noted, critics of the technology have tended to come from the nation’s best universities, where the level of pedagogy is much better than at most schools.

    “Often they come from very prestigious institutions where, in fact, they do a much better job of providing feedback than a machine ever could,” Dr. Shermis said. “There seems to be a lack of appreciation of what is actually going on in the real world.”
    http://www.nytimes.com/2013/04/05/sc...gewanted=print
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  2. #2
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    Sounds like one big grammar checking software to me. As far as being used for college level work? Maybe for 100 level classes. But really, isn't grading papers what TA's are for?

  3. #3

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    The university where I teach has been looking into software like this for some time. The software they've been talking about is much more than a grammar checker. It checks content using AI, much like the software they talk about in this article.

    They've also looked at doing things like hiring people whose entire job is grading student work, to free up faculty time to actually teach, and to interact with students one-on-one.

    They're looking at this not just for 100 level courses, but for all courses.

    Faculty at my uni aren't yet sure what we think, because we really don't have much info yet. But I admit, I'm intrigued by the possibilities.
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  4. #4
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    This interests me because there is a big movement in my state to get rid of remedial courses for college students. Getting rid of remedial courses will not get rid of students needing remedial classes. This could be a really cost-efficient way to get some students up to speed on things like organizing a paragraph or a paper, stating ideas clearly, and using complete, structured sentences.

    I don't know how well the software could assess the quality of ideas, but software can definitely assess the elements I listed.
    "The secret to creativity is knowing how to hide your sources."-- Albert Einstein.

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