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  1. #41
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    Oh those pics are nice. He looks very stylish! I bet the program is too, hehe.

  2. #42

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    Quote Originally Posted by angelflies View Post
    Oh those pics are nice. He looks very stylish! I bet the program is too, hehe.
    The video is linked in this thread if you'd like to watch it.
    "Randy [Starkman (1960-April 16, 2012)] lived by the same motto as the rest of us. The Olympics isn’t every four years, it’s every single day. He just got it." --Canadian Olympic kayaker Adam van Koeverden

  3. #43
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    OK thanks I will watch it now!

  4. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jun Y View Post
    ...
    Skating programs are not like baking --- mix all the right ingredients in the right proportions and you get perfect muffins every time. Who knows what makes a memorable program for the ages? We can theorize till the cows come home but in the end it's all about the mysterious "chemistry." What I am really staying is: just because Mr. Dickson stormed back to the limelight with the Eleanor Rigby program for Alex Johnson, it doesn't mean he can make every skater look breathtaking in every program. Viewers adjust your expectations accordingly...
    You make good points generally, and I don't disagree with the gist of your views. However, I personally feel your statement about Tom "storming back to the limelight with Eleanor Rigby..." is completely beside the point. I personally do not think Tom had to "storm back," since he never went away. And I doubt Tom considers what he does for skaters as having anything at all to do with "being in or out of the limelight." In any case, it's not exactly clear what you mean by that phrasing. Perhaps you mean that Eleanor Rigby is a unique program that really stands out. In that respect, I think Tom might agree with you, since he stated in a recent interview (posted in GSD) that his favorite programs he’s choreographed for skaters are The Mission for Matt Savoie, the Brazilian long program for Ryan Jahnke, Eight Seasons for Jeremy Abbott, Picasso’s Dance short program for Yukina Ota, and Eleanor Rigby for Alex Johnson.

    To me one of the more interesting factors in the success of Eleanor Rigby is that Tom is working as both coach and choreographer for Alex Johnson. That makes for a closer kind of connection and a daily give-and-take in developing a program. When Tom does choreography for skaters he is not coaching, a whole host of different factors and dynamics are involved. In Tom’s own words:

    When I begin choreography for a new client there is a period of time where a relationship is built… Much also has to do with their relationship with their coach and that coach’s teaching style…

    I always like to hear what vision the skater may have for themselves. Sometimes they don’t have a vision, sometimes they have a vague idea or feeling but can’t put that idea into musical terms. I like to experiment with more than one idea and style as I almost always find that the more the skater explores and educates themselves that their scope widens as to what they perceive as creative possibilities…
    Here’s another link re that recent interview with Tom (already posted by Sylvia in GSD): http://everythingfigureskating.com/m...h-tom-dickson/

    From Tom’s comments throughout the interview, it seems no notion of “limelight” figures anywhere in either his personal or his professional life. He seems much more interested in helping skaters develop a balance between artistry and athleticism, with emphasis on the creative performance aspect. And even more so on helping skaters access the motivation needed to bring out who they are onto the ice in a soulful blend of movement and musical interpretation:

    When a skater is lacking motivation I try to get them to forget everything about skating that puts demands on them. One way I do this is by finding soul in our sport/art. We go to seek rejuvenation in the performing arts…

    Skating is driven by art and soul searching, not by goals, points and touch downs. Therefore we need soul nurturing and creative inspiration. Without this skating becomes dry and lifeless… This is the dichotomy of our sport that brings particular frustration to me as a choreographer and coach. How does one train an artist in a sport that doesn’t completely know it’s an art form!

    Quote Originally Posted by Jun Y View Post
    ...(Besides, as long as Adam is comfortable and happy with this "Afternoon of Faun" program, how much I like it is not important. It's a silly thing to say but it's true.) ...
    Bolded part is definitely true, and not silly to say at all, in my estimation.

    It boils back down to Faun for Adam being in an early debut stage, and he’s looking very comfortable with the program. It’ll be interesting to see how it evolves.

  5. #45

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    aftershocks, maybe you could copy over your initial response to Jun Y above to the Dickson interview thread in GSD and continue the conversation there? (since that part has nothing to do with Rippon's new program)
    Last edited by Sylvia; 04-10-2013 at 02:25 PM.
    "Randy [Starkman (1960-April 16, 2012)] lived by the same motto as the rest of us. The Olympics isn’t every four years, it’s every single day. He just got it." --Canadian Olympic kayaker Adam van Koeverden

  6. #46
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    All I can say is my hats off to aftershocks. You are able to wring meaning out of my words that never even occurred to me.

  7. #47

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    Never mind my earlier post then.
    "Randy [Starkman (1960-April 16, 2012)] lived by the same motto as the rest of us. The Olympics isn’t every four years, it’s every single day. He just got it." --Canadian Olympic kayaker Adam van Koeverden

  8. #48

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jun Y View Post
    Skating programs are not like baking --- mix all the right ingredients in the right proportions and you get perfect muffins every time. Who knows what makes a memorable program for the ages? We can theorize till the cows come home but in the end it's all about the mysterious "chemistry."
    Quote Originally Posted by dinakt View Post
    But you are so right in that chemistry is a mystery
    I think that audience response is another ingredient in that chemistry -- which is often highly influenced by how cleanly a skater performs the program, competition results, and availability on video.

    Programs that very few people have ever seen are not going to become memorable programs for the ages, especially if no one else will ever get to see it again after the live performance because it was never captured on any recording medium.

    Ditto for programs that were brilliant in conception, and in execution sometimes in practice or in lesser competitions, but that the skater completely bombed when the eyes and cameras of the world were on them.

    Also, if a TV network including commentators in one country were rooting against a skater, fans from that skater might be influenced by the commentary to dislike the performance, whereas fans in another country with more sympathetic commentary might consider it a masterpiece.

    And of course individual fans have personal preferences as well that might make them perceive mostly weaknesses in a performance they don't think should have beaten their favorites, or adore a program that's objectively nothing special artistically but that produced an exciting result with a strong performance at an important event.

    As for my opinion of Rippon's program, I think it's very promising but I'll wait to see how it develops in terms of his expressing a point of view, a specific character for this particular faun on this particular afternoon, before declaring it a masterpiece.

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