Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 28
  1. #1
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Posts
    378
    vCash
    500
    Rep Power
    0

    Wink Becoming a Figure skating judge

    Say it's been a dream of mine to have my life revolve around Figure skating as more than just a hobby,
    And say i do not have skating experience, Other then following it,
    And say i would like to take a few years, or as much as it may take, to become a Judge, or maybe an Organizer or an official, Or whatever,
    How could i go about that ?
    if say, my federation isn't exactly the vastest ^_^ or the most cooperative.

    I assume i would need to learn some skating?
    read all the ISU books?
    go see competitions?
    get in touch with a bunch of people? do training for it ?
    maybe i could use a degree of some sort ??

    ANY thoughts on the subject would be appreciated,

    And yes, I realise judges probably aren't paid that much, or at all

  2. #2

    Join Date
    May 2002
    Posts
    29,494
    vCash
    500
    Rep Power
    39669
    Does your country have any figure skating clubs/rinks near where you are?
    "Randy [Starkman (1960-April 16, 2012)] lived by the same motto as the rest of us. The Olympics isnít every four years, itís every single day. He just got it." --Canadian Olympic kayaker Adam van Koeverden

  3. #3
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Posts
    378
    vCash
    500
    Rep Power
    0
    i'm from Israel,
    And i rarely see any Israeli judges ( maybe once every few years in Ice dance )
    I would assume there is not much demand ?
    Also they are so hard to reach...



    A new rink has just opened around where i live, That's where they did the National event
    Last edited by Eladola; 03-25-2013 at 03:51 AM.

  4. #4

    Join Date
    May 2002
    Posts
    29,494
    vCash
    500
    Rep Power
    39669
    Did you know about Israeli Nationals that took place this past weekend?
    http://iisf.org.il/blog/
    Holon ice rink, Israel
    ISRAEL NATIONAL CHAMPIONSHIPS-FIGURE SKATING
    22/03/2013 11:00-12:00 Short Programs
    18:00-19:00 Free Programs
    GALA PERFORMANCE BY THE ISRAELI NATIONAL TEAM SKATERS:
    SATURDAY 23/03/13 AT 15:00
    Entrance Free of Charge
    That would have been a good place to start.

    ETA: Did you attend?
    Last edited by Sylvia; 03-25-2013 at 03:58 AM.
    "Randy [Starkman (1960-April 16, 2012)] lived by the same motto as the rest of us. The Olympics isnít every four years, itís every single day. He just got it." --Canadian Olympic kayaker Adam van Koeverden

  5. #5
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Posts
    378
    vCash
    500
    Rep Power
    0
    A friend of mine found out about this the evening before it happened,
    Naturaly it's not on the news here,
    I couldn't get out of work in time sadly :'(
    But she went and gave me reports , Though she didn't really come in contact with anyone
    i Also got the phone number of the secretary of the head of the federation, But i can never get an answer


    Are you trying to say that i should basically just talk about it with the Federation and they would have all the answers ?
    Last edited by Eladola; 03-25-2013 at 04:25 AM.

  6. #6

    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Melbourne, Australia
    Age
    47
    Posts
    17,919
    vCash
    500
    Rep Power
    31401
    You starting point should be the rink - see if they have a skating club that runs local competiitons.

    To be perfectly honest, you need to think small. It is probably not just a matter of saying "I want to be a judge" and you instantly become a judge. I would start off volunteering for events (eg playing music, announcing, gate marshalling, working on the sale table) and get your foot in the door that way. You can also do things like Data Entry or Accountant which involve computer skills. Although Data Entry again I think requires some skating knowledge to do the job effectively.

    As for judging, it really does help to be a skater. You don't have to be a high level skater (my skating experience is as an adult so what I can do is limited) but you do need to know what you are looking at (being able to tell the difference between a flip and toe loop) and gradually you learn what it is you are looking for with regards to good things and bad things about elements. But it takes lots of practise and watching lots of skating. And it isn't necessarily about top skaters. Most of the time you will be judging young skaters who are only doing singles or doubles or even just learning to skate.

    Hope that helps. Any questions please ask.
    When you are up to your arse in alligators it is difficult to remember you were only meant to be draining the swamp.

  7. #7

    Join Date
    May 2002
    Posts
    29,494
    vCash
    500
    Rep Power
    39669
    If you are serious about learning to be a judge, not only do you need to spend countless volunteer hours, but also have people willing to work with you, starting at the local rink.

    ETA: It's a big commitment to make, and you have to be able to enjoy the process, the grunt work, etc., and not expect any "rewards" other than the satisfaction of contributing to the successful running of the sport, starting at the grassroots level.
    Last edited by Sylvia; 03-25-2013 at 04:45 AM.
    "Randy [Starkman (1960-April 16, 2012)] lived by the same motto as the rest of us. The Olympics isnít every four years, itís every single day. He just got it." --Canadian Olympic kayaker Adam van Koeverden

  8. #8
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Posts
    378
    vCash
    500
    Rep Power
    0
    Yes, i understand

    But before all the grunt work, countless hours and people working with me,
    I'm just trying to understand the A B C, AT least,

    What could help me, For instance, Is pointing me to someone who knows these things,
    Like if i wanted to be a Doctor, I would know i have to achieve a certain grade to get accepted to medicine school
    Study for an amount of years, Go be an intern, Then work for less working my way up

    It would'nt really have helped me JUST to know that it's hard work ...

    If you believe that what i should do is to haress ( ) my federation until they soften up to me, and then try to learn it myself from there,
    Much like an actor or a musician trying to get booked, Then i guess that's what i'll do,
    I just kinda hoped there's a more, hmm, orthodox way ^_^ ...

    Oh, And thank you for the links btw !
    Last edited by Eladola; 03-25-2013 at 06:51 AM.

  9. #9

    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Melbourne, Australia
    Age
    47
    Posts
    17,919
    vCash
    500
    Rep Power
    31401
    Contact the your local ice rink, ask them for a contact person for the club that is based there and volunteer - that is your starting point. Things will develop from there. However unless there is someone on this forum who is going to know what the situation is for you locally, you are going to have to do a bit of research yourself to find the contacts.

    There are no golden rules about how people get involved in the sport. It happens in a variety of ways and everyone will have a different story of how the started in whatever roles they do, whether that be judging or just being a volunteer.
    When you are up to your arse in alligators it is difficult to remember you were only meant to be draining the swamp.

  10. #10
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Posts
    378
    vCash
    500
    Rep Power
    0
    Ok willie,

    Thanks a lot

    Have you been involved in FS in some way ?

  11. #11

    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Melbourne, Australia
    Age
    47
    Posts
    17,919
    vCash
    500
    Rep Power
    31401
    Quote Originally Posted by Eladola View Post
    Have you been involved in FS in some way ?
    I started skating nearly 20 years ago and it grew from there. Currently I am a judge and administrator, but I have basically done any role that is involved in running the sport and competitions. So you could say I have been involved in some way.
    When you are up to your arse in alligators it is difficult to remember you were only meant to be draining the swamp.

  12. #12
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Iowa
    Posts
    10,988
    vCash
    500
    Rep Power
    0
    I thought about trying to become a judge, but it was to be an expensive process. In the United States you have to trial judge a number of events, and none of your expenses are reimbursed- since we do not have many local competitions, that meant a lot of traveling: hotels and flights. You have to work towards a test judge appointment first, and then work towards a competition judge appointment. I decided it wasn't worth it. I've volunteered to judge Basic Skills events at my rink, and also got my ISI Bronze judge test (that is just taking a test if you are a coach) and judged a few of those competitions. They aren't really "real" judging though.

    I thought I'd post a few of the US links for reference:
    http://www.usfsa.org/About.asp?id=108
    http://www.usfsa.org/About.asp?id=514
    http://www.usfigureskating.org/content/TJKitFinal.pdf

  13. #13

    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Posts
    2,214
    vCash
    5550
    Rep Power
    17220
    In the U.S. they are now offering judges schools that allow for testing for an appointment for those who have no appointment. You need peer evaluations from other judges and need to really know the tests before attending the seminar, because you need to take an exam upon signing up for the seminars and then do mock judging at the seminar. It's not practical to just sign up for the seminar with no experience and expect to get a judging appointment but it might be faster than the "usual" process, especially since you can test for more than one appointment and can test up more than one level if you are really knowledgeable. The seminar that was recently announced and whose deadline hasn't passed is in Warwick, RI in July. There is supposed to be one in the Midwest to be announced soon.

    http://www.usfsa.org/event_details.asp?id=49087

  14. #14

    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Age
    53
    Posts
    10,432
    vCash
    500
    Rep Power
    20949
    In the US, it's relatively easy to become a test judge if you live somewhere close to several different clubs that hold test sessions several times a year. And if the clubs also host competitions, you will get experience judging lower levels under 6.0 and maybe even to try IJS judging before getting a competition judging appointment.

    For a nonskater, it will be necessary to spend a lot of time in the local rink getting familiar with the different skills and skill levels. Taking lessons is a good way to spend that time, on the ice. If that's not possible for physical reasons, then volunteering in capacities that allow you to watch the skating (e.g., ice monitor) can be useful. It would also be useful to volunteer in capacities that allow you to interact with the officials personally and ask their advice.

    Even in the US, if you live somewhere that is more isolated from skating activity, e.g., only one club in driving distance that only has one or two judged events a year, you would have to travel quite a bit at your own expense to become a judge (or accountant) and to move up the ranks.

    Once you do get the higher appointments and get invited to judge at different events, though, you would end up traveling at the host club's expense.

    This is far from glamorous. Most US judges spend much time judging low-level skaters in local tests and competitions, and comparatively little time judging elite skaters. Those with national appointments will judge more at higher levels and may not have time for as many club-level events.
    Only a small percentage of the domestic judging corps go on to become international judges.

    I don't know how it works in other countries. I imagine it's much harder for a nonskater to become a judge in Israel because there must be few judged events in the whole country, so there's not much opportunity to learn by doing. I don't know whether there would be opportunities to trial judge abroad, if you can afford to travel to places with more skating.

    I would not be surprised if a small federation of this sort relies only on former skaters to serve all its judging needs.

    I would hope that there is some process for skaters who train in Israel to become judges for their federation when they become adults, if they're interested.

    But of those who do become judges within a small federation, the opportunities for international judging would be greater, if they start young enough.

  15. #15
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Posts
    684
    vCash
    500
    Rep Power
    0
    Thank you everyone for such an informative thread!! Good luck Eladola!

  16. #16

    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Melbourne, Australia
    Age
    47
    Posts
    17,919
    vCash
    500
    Rep Power
    31401
    It definately costs money to be a judge. Whilst I do get a reimbursement for my expenses for local competitions, I end up spending way more than what I get back. Going to Australian Nationals the last couple of years has probably cost me $2,000 alone for flights, accommodation and other related expenses. That does not include the time you take off work (two weeks paid annual leave) which would probably bring the total cost to $5,000. That is time you volunteer to the sport that could be your own time. Over the last three years I would have volunteered over a full month of my annual leave for skating related events.

    I sound like I am complaining, but the reality is, I can understand why people drop out of judging or don't get started because it does cost you at the end of the day to be a judge in the sport. And you talk to people from other sports who do get something for their contribution and they think you are mad that you are doing it.

    It is also a reason that if people are going to get shitty at me I will give them shitty back (or at least not put up with it and tell them to suck it up in the nicest possible way). I literally don't get paid to put up with shit.
    When you are up to your arse in alligators it is difficult to remember you were only meant to be draining the swamp.

  17. #17

    Join Date
    May 2002
    Posts
    29,494
    vCash
    500
    Rep Power
    39669
    Quote Originally Posted by Eladola View Post
    But before all the grunt work, countless hours and people working with me,
    I'm just trying to understand the A B C, AT least,
    ...
    If you believe that what i should do is to haress ( ) my federation until they soften up to me, and then try to learn it myself from there,
    Much like an actor or a musician trying to get booked, Then i guess that's what i'll do,
    I just kinda hoped there's a more, hmm, orthodox way ^_^ ...
    I don't recommend "harassing" your federation at this point; start at your local rink, like Aussy Willy suggested.
    "Randy [Starkman (1960-April 16, 2012)] lived by the same motto as the rest of us. The Olympics isnít every four years, itís every single day. He just got it." --Canadian Olympic kayaker Adam van Koeverden

  18. #18

    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Melbourne, Australia
    Age
    47
    Posts
    17,919
    vCash
    500
    Rep Power
    31401
    Quote Originally Posted by Sylvia View Post
    I don't recommend "harassing" your federation at this point; start at your local rink, like Aussy Willy suggested.
    I totally agree. I know I certainly would not appreciate anyone who was not currently involved in the sport trying to weedle their way in out of the blue. And then I would recommend they contact their local club if they want to volunteer.
    When you are up to your arse in alligators it is difficult to remember you were only meant to be draining the swamp.

  19. #19
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Kanada
    Age
    34
    Posts
    2,056
    vCash
    500
    Rep Power
    0
    In Canada, there are documents outlining what qualifications are needed to begin the process of becoming an official. To answer your question about what is required of you (eg., whether you need a skating background, or a certain amount of volunteer hours), try to find out if that exists. I agree with others who have suggested contacting a local club. Every club and organizing body will be slightly different. For instance, in Canada, some Sections pay to send their trial judges away to get more experience, and some judges have to pay their own way to get more experience. Some positions require a skating background (judges and tech panel), and some don't (data specialists, accountants, data input, video replay). It's best to ask questions locally to get started. Good luck!

  20. #20
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Posts
    378
    vCash
    500
    Rep Power
    0
    Thanks everyone for the Tips and wishes

    I do believe i have my good knowledge of this system and skating elements going for me (Been watching since i was 8)
    And also that i am willing to travel, this season i went to Trophee Bompard, And next season i'm planning on hitting SA, SC and Europeans, Possibly Bompard again,
    And if the good lord Jesus christ smiles down upon me, The Olys

    I think from what i gather out of all of this, Seeing options in ISR are limited and i might want to spend a few years in north america for school, Is i should get in contact with a big club, Volunteer there, Learn to skate, Read the books, go to the events, perhaps let them in on my goals and after a couple or a few years see where it goes from there ?
    If anything maybe then my federation will recognise me as someone who knows what's up .

    Heading towards the new Rink in a couple of days to have a look and skate around btw, Hopefully there might be someone to talk to there

    Also, who do coaches usually use for musical edits ?
    being a former music student i should be able to assist with that i guess

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •