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  1. #1
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    CDC: 1 in 68 U.S. children has autism

    http://www.cnn.com/2014/03/27/health...html?hpt=hp_t2

    My 3 year old son is on the autism spectrum. This statistic made me very sad although I think the rise in numbers is due to a lot more awareness and the changes in the last 20 years in the diagnostic criteria which include Aspergers and PDD-NOS.

    There is so much more information out there than there was even 10 years ago in regards to early signs and the importance of early intervention.

    I hope we can someday find a cause and maybe even a cure.

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    You are right about the awareness in present day. My oldest son was diagnosed Asperger's when he was 7. My daughter has a hyperactive disorder with AD/HD. As I always say, the best cure for ASD is not just love but the understanding as well.

    Wish you all the best. It will be hard but worth it at the end of the day.

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    I'm glad that this is being reported, as I suspected, the figure was much higher than I had originally thought, but there are so many varying diagnoses, and different conditions along the spectrum. I was diagnosed with Asperger's myself when I was about 11 or 12 and I did struggle through my first couple years of junior high, it was not fun, I was different, I couldn't relate to any of the other kids, I was isolated and bullied and taunted repeatedly, almost to the point where I thought about taking my own life, and on top of that too I was struggling with my own identity and sexuality (I didn't come out until much later, not until I was 21), but I've graduated from a couple of different post-secondary institutions, and although not without mt struggles, I am working a great job with fantastic boss that I really enjoy and I've got plans to travel all through Europe next summer I believe everyone with any condition along the autism spectrum (or any other condition) does have something to offer and contribute , I'm also glad about the awareness being raised and research being done.
    Kyle

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    Honestly, I think this statistic is inflated because it lumps together everyone on the autistic spectrum and doesn't distinguish between the many types and severities of autism. There are high functioning mild causes of autism that have little in common, from a practical perspective, with severe low functioning cases.

    I worry that by expanding the definition and criteria for an autism diagnosis, resources will be diluted, and that hurts families of severe low functioning cases the most.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gazpacho View Post
    Honestly, I think this statistic is inflated because it lumps together everyone on the autistic spectrum and doesn't distinguish between the many types and severities of autism. There are high functioning mild causes of autism that have little in common, from a practical perspective, with severe low functioning cases.

    I worry that by expanding the definition and criteria for an autism diagnosis, resources will be diluted, and that hurts families of severe low functioning cases the most.
    I agree. I do not like how all autism spectrum disorders are all lumped together now.

    The new criteria really is not that different from the previous criteria-it actually seems like it might be a bit more difficult to receive a diagnosis than it did in the past.

    My son is diagnosed with "mild" autism. At 3 years old, he is developmentally an 18 month old. I have no idea how that can be considered "mild" but it is. My guess is he will not be potty trained until 4 if I am lucky or even 5. He cannot eat with a fork or spoon, cannot use a straw, cannot sip from an open cup, he only has about 5 functional words (cup, more, uh oh, mama, dada-all acquired in the last 3 months), does not understand social situations such as birthday parties or Christmas. He has no imagination or pretend play skills-he does not understand dress up or costumes. He spells his name all day long-over and over and over. he said the alphabet backwards the other day. he does not understand having a friend or playing with children-it is like peers are invisible. he is obsessed with objects that spin. Yet he has seen a pediatric neurologist and neuropsychologist and they both told me he is mild. He has been in intensive therapy since he was 2-I cannot imagine where he would be developmentally if we did not have the resources we do. He would probably be functioning as an 11 month old. So I do disagree that children with milder cases are unnecessarily taking services away from the lower functioning children-my son completely needs 20+ hours of therapy a week to learn very basic skills. When he turned 2 he still had never clapped or pointed at anything.

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