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  1. #21
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    In my latest Manleywoman SkateCast with Carol Heiss she actually discusses the rivalry: Skatecast #62 with Carol Heiss

    Other relevant podcasts to this Retrospective:

    SkateCast #55 with Frances Dafoe: Frances Dafoe has a lot to say about the Pairs scandal. Juicy stuff.

    SkateCast #47 with David Jenkins: David Jenkins talks about his brother Hayes, and his own experiences at the 1956 Olympics.

    And actually I've been in talks with Tenley Albright for an interview for www.manleywoman.com. Fingers crossed!

    Thanks as always for floskate and Maofan for the amazing walks down memory lane! They are invaluable.
    In my spare time, I like to interview figure skating legends.

  2. #22

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    I hope that your "negotiation" with Tenley Albright is successful!

  3. #23

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    Quote Originally Posted by manleywoman View Post
    I've been in talks with Tenley Albright for an interview for www.manleywoman.com. Fingers crossed!
    That's fantastic - Can't wait to hear it! She is a remarkable person, as it takes tremendous courage and fortitude to come back from the kind of injury setback she had just 2 weeks before the Olympics. Not many people can do that.

  4. #24

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    Recent Article on David Jenkins

    Short Sports Illustrated Article on Yvonne Sugden

    Note: the 1956 Olympics was the last time that the figure skating events were held outdoors at the Olympics. At the 1960 Olympics, they were held indoors for the first time at the Blyth Memorial Arena, which was built in 1959 specifically for the Squaw Valley Olympics to hold the figure skating and ice hockey events.

  5. #25

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    Quote Originally Posted by manleywoman View Post
    SkateCast #55 with Frances Dafoe: Frances Dafoe has a lot to say about the Pairs scandal. Juicy stuff.
    This podcast was really fascinating, particularly the following 2 sections (taken from the transcipts):-

    On winning the silver medal at the 1956 Olympics: It was a dicey thing. They’d drawn the number of judges, and at 5 o’clock in the afternoon, [the Canadian] judge said, okay, we’ve got a fair shot here, there are seven judges and there’s a neutral one in there. We went out on the ice two hours later and suddenly there were nine judges. So you’re not talking judging now, you’re talking manipulation. But I really have to emphasize that it was not the skaters. The Austrian skating federation were very good politickers [laughs].
    On judging, and on being suspended by the Canadian Figure Skating Association: Norrie and I felt a tremendous sense of responsibility [after retiring] because in all honesty we were the only people at that time who understood pairs skating. So Norrie and I approached it as honest judges, and even if that means we could get thrown off the panel, we would judge it as we see it. And that’s what we honestly would do. Lots of times you can be considered as being too patriotic, or something of that kind, and that wasn’t something that occurred to either of us.

    All I know about [the suspension] — Norrie had written a letter and asked for permission to come and speak at [the CFSA meeting] and they said, absolutely not. So then Norrie sent a letter recommending certain things that could happen, like pair tests and things like that, and they were so furious to think that Norrie had written this letter that they suspended us both. And I knew nothing about the letter at all. I’m not making an excuse, because I would have supported him anyway. And then a couple of years later someone woke up to the fact that I didn’t know, and said, okay, we’ll reinstate you. And I said, well, are you going to reinstate Norrie? And they said, oh, no. And I said, well, then, I’m not being reinstated either because I agree with what he said. So another several years went by [laughs] and they wanted us to sign a letter saying we would abide by the rules, which we had. So the compromise was, I signed a letter saying I would abide by the rules and regulations as I have always done in the past. So that was fine. But that was really splitting hairs.
    That's a couple who really stood by what they believed in and their principles! Good for them

    Here is an article I also came across on Frances Dafoe & Norris Bowden

    Also came across this passage from the book, Figure Skating: A History by James R. Hines, in reference to Dafoe & Bowden's career, and the outcome of the pairs competition at the 1956 Olympics:-

    Dafoe and Bowden easily became World Champions in 1954 and repeated for a second year, but in 1956 they slipped to second place behind the Austrians Elisabeth Schwartz and Kurt Oppelt at both the Olympic Games and the World Championships.

    The Olympic results were hotly debated , partly because Dafoe and Bowden had defeated Schwartz and Oppelt consistently for four years, but the controversy related primarily to the Canadian's overhead lifts, which, some critics claimed, violated ISU rules. Questions were raised regarding the number of revolutions done at full extension, and charges contended that Dafoe was being carried. Although athletic movements not yet covered in the rulebook were incorporated in their routines, increased athleticism was not new. It was the wave of the future and in the spirit of the postwar style.

    The controversy caused the ISU to debate, review, and amend pair skating rules over the next few years, especially with regard to the number of revolutions of the lifting partner allowed at full extension. The number, set at three, was later increased to three and a half. An indirect result of the controversy was movement toward a short or technical program. Pair skating at the time was decided on the basis of a single free skate.

    The Canadians finished ahead of the Austrians by a tenth of a point, 101.9 to 101.8, at the Olympic Games, but points decided a winner only if the total ordinals and majorities were tied. Both pairs received four first-place ordinals, but the Austrians received more second-place ordinals than the Canadians.

  6. #26
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    Heiss was very upset she lost to Albright here wasnt she. I heard she thought she was robbed and had a little tantrum. Is that true.

  7. #27

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    Carol very much wanted to win the OGM in 1956 because her mother was dying of cancer.
    Several articles mentioned her mother's condition; and struggle to attend the Olympics.
    She came very close to winning; and promised her mother that she would continue competing, even after her death.

    I don't recall any mention of a "tantrum"; only her determination to honor her mother by skating as well as she possibly could.

  8. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by Maofan7 View Post
    However, immediately after winning the 1954 world title, Busch decided to take up an offer from the Hollywood Ice Revue, and promptly retired. Albright then regained her world title at the 1955 world championships, re-establishing herself as the favourite for the Olympic title.
    It would be interesting to know more what happened here. The U.S. had never had a ladies champ at that time, and Busch was offered money by a U.S. show which allowed a U.S. skater to win. Maybe Tenley Albright would have won anyway, but I wonder how much they offered Gundi Busch and who all was involved?

  9. #29

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    She wrote a book (2009) which has not appeared in English.
    It probably has more information.

    Mein Eiskaltes Leben - "My Ice Cold Life"
    by Gundi Busch, Ruth Damwerth

    Perhaps one of our German speaking members could help.


    An article announcing her death, earlier this year.
    http://www.mopo.de/sportmix/weltmeis...,26089564.html

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