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  1. #1

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    Addiction and Vice - interesting article

    Found this very interesting article written by someone about his friend who has gone from one addiction to another.

    http://www.theage.com.au/executive-s...24-2os8e.html#

    I know there are people who are in similar situations with friends or relatives. Thought it might make an interesting discussion and something people might want to talk about.
    When you are up to your arse in alligators it is difficult to remember you were only meant to be draining the swamp.

  2. #2

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    I have a friend who simply can't do anything in moderation. The one thing he is truly addicted to is gambling. The other things he has no addiction to but he can't control himself when he does them. He is incapable of having a drink or two, he has as many as he can until he is kicked out of wherever he is. He hardly ever does drugs but the few times he has, he does them until he is unconscious. His gambling is the same, he can't go on the boat with $100, he loses every thing he has and is lucky to have a cash making job. I don't get it. There is no off switch with him. Oh, he is also like this with food. He diets constantly but when he goes off of it he absolutely goes berserk. He will order enough to feed 4 people when we go out to eat.
    -Brian
    "Michelle would never be caught with sausage grease staining her Vera Wang." - rfisher

  3. #3

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    Addictions are not only compulsive behaviours, but also a means of coping or numbing one's emotions. A lot of people have highly stressful, exhausting and difficult lives, which will inevitably drive some people to addictions.

    There are process or activity addictions as well as substance addictions: shopping, cleaning, and playing games. I have a friend who is addicted to playing Scrabble, which she peppers with the odd poker game. She has not read a book since she became a Scrabble addict some ten years ago. All she reads is list of words to help her win at Scrabble. She sleeps at her computer, between games.

    IMO, television is the top addiction in this society. And I find it interesting how some addictions are condemned (smoking being the number one culprit these days), while others are socially sanctioned - some jobs more or less require their employees to become workaholics and plenty of food companies aim is to get people hooked on sugar. Just look at the breakfast cereal aisle in the supermarket, for starters. Then, some of the SSRIs/anti-depressants people are taking can be addictive and really hard to kick, or so I've been told. But those addictions are acceptable and in the cases of some of those drugs (i.e Chantix), replacements for smoking.

    Substance addictions may often be more damaging that process or activity addictions, but the latter can have some serious consequences, as well. Especially since the two can go together - smoking at the casino, or drinking beer/overeating in front of the computer or television.

    And there are levels of addictiveness for all addictions. But I don't think there is a one-size-fits-all prescription for dealing with it. Some people's addictions will surely kill them, and some people will suddenly one day find the motivation to quit a destructive addiction. In some cases, a major health crisis may give a wake up call, or people will see the need for a major life overhaul to end a destructive and/or potentially fatal addiction.

    The major challenge, in my view, is that most addictions serve a purpose, especially when you consider the broad range of addictions that exist. I suppose there are some addictions that are purely physical, such as the person who has one sip of alcohol and then goes on a major bender. But in many cases, the addictive behaviour has a pay-off or benefit.

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