Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 21 to 40 of 50
  1. #21
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    in my head
    Age
    28
    Posts
    5,713
    vCash
    500
    Rep Power
    0
    1) I'd let the kid choose.

    2) Anything including horses, except perhaps Thoroughbred racing and eventing (too many horrible accidents happening there ). Working in stables is good for young girls and women (and probably for blokes too), as it teaches them assertiveness, responsibility, respect, and teamwork. Many women in positions of power (CEOs and the like) have spent a lot of time in stables.

    3) Parkour. Because it's the sport I wish I'd heard of before puberty turned me into a lazy-ass couch potato.

  2. #22
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    518
    vCash
    500
    Rep Power
    0
    If you are looking for a sport with good potential for a college scholarship, try women's rowing. I know someone in SoCal whose daughter chose rowing due to the high level of competition in high school for other varsity sports, and she got several full ride scholarship offers for college. There are not a lot of women doing rowing. It's great exercise with a low rate of injury. Since Title IX came into existence, many colleges have sports teams for women in some of the more obscure sports, and they are looking for anyone with experience in them.

    That said, girls should select a sport that they enjoy doing, not one that their parents force them into.

  3. #23
    Shadow dancing
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Camping in the great outdoors
    Posts
    16,134
    vCash
    800
    Rep Power
    12955
    Quote Originally Posted by Aceon6 View Post
    I'd have her pick one team sport and one individual sport. The team one would be the sport where she had the most friends and the most fun. The individual sport would be the one she enjoyed practicing the most.
    That's what my son did (although not by plan). He played hockey and baseball (the fun team sports where he wasn't all about the wins) and golf - which he practically lives and breathes. How someone can enjoy hitting a golf ball on the range for several hours is beyond me, but he loves it.

    Quote Originally Posted by Rob View Post
    Whatever she likes best, but if she likes them all the same, then golf. Fewer serious injuries and more longevity. Plus, if you don't make it professionally, you can play with friends and family, and it is a great skill to have for business development. If not that, then basketball (if she was tall) or soccer because it would be great to play in college and great for fitness.
    Quote Originally Posted by Artemis@BC View Post
    I thought the question was about sports.

    At the elite level, these kids are athletic. Plus, the mental aspect of the game is a killer.

    Oh, and for girls there's lots of good scholarships available in golf.

  4. #24
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Posts
    460
    vCash
    500
    Rep Power
    0
    Thanks for the ideas...she loves everything she tries, but skating is her favorite. I keep having her try different sports that she might do longer as well, but there are many I'm not familiar with...for example field hockey. Anything horses is out - I don't have funds for that - skating is a big expense.

  5. #25
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Midwest
    Posts
    4,726
    vCash
    500
    Rep Power
    0
    What do her genes look like? Seriously. If she's likely to be petite, skating, gymnastics and such are a great pick. If you and her dad are both 6'6", then it is time to think of basketball or volleyball. If you are wanting to settle into something that she can do in the long term, it is something to consider.

    (And must put in a plug for volleyball...it is a great sport of teamwork, power and finesse).

  6. #26

    Join Date
    Apr 2001
    Location
    City of Blinding Light
    Posts
    15,748
    vCash
    500
    Rep Power
    4219
    My daughter and I both ice skate, which is a PITA. It's expensive, ice time is limited so I can only get her to the ice once a week... To be honest, unless you have the cash and can get her to a rink during the day (thus you don't work days like I do), forget it.

    I put her in Gaelic Football, of all things, because here, it's free - sponsored by the GAA. I like free. But right now, because my husband is working later on practice days, she can't get there, so she's on temporary hiatus.

    She wanted to be in soccer. I think she'd be great in track... My main problem is that I can't get her to practices and stuff, because I don't get home until 6:15pm. That limits what sports she can do. So one thing to consider is whether you can get her to practices - do the practices and games/meets occur on days/times when you can actually get her there.
    And so, dear Lord, it is with deep sadness that we turn over to you this young woman, whose dream to ride on a giant swan resulted in her death. Maybe it is your way of telling us... to buy American.

  7. #27
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Main floor
    Posts
    2,432
    vCash
    500
    Rep Power
    0

  8. #28

    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Beijing, China
    Age
    34
    Posts
    12,638
    vCash
    500
    Rep Power
    11999
    Quote Originally Posted by TheGirlCanSkate View Post
    Thanks for the ideas...she loves everything she tries, but skating is her favorite. I keep having her try different sports that she might do longer as well, but there are many I'm not familiar with...for example field hockey. Anything horses is out - I don't have funds for that - skating is a big expense.
    Does she want to be an athlete?

  9. #29
    Re-registered User
    Join Date
    Jul 2001
    Location
    Nowhere in particular
    Posts
    5,826
    vCash
    500
    Rep Power
    1360
    Another bonus for Curling- girls and boys can play on the same team without gender being an issue as far as skill goes.
    ‎"You emerge victorious from the maze you've been travelling in." Oct 21,2012- Best Fortune Cookie Ever!

  10. #30
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Posts
    460
    vCash
    500
    Rep Power
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by Angelskates View Post
    Does she want to be an athlete?
    She is unhappy when she doesn't have sports. Both physically and mentally. I think she will always have to be physically busy.

    She says she wants to coach skating, be an ornithologist, artist and mathematician. You know all the things kids what to be!

  11. #31
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Apr 2001
    Location
    Rejecting your reality and substituting my own
    Age
    30
    Posts
    10,878
    vCash
    500
    Rep Power
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by TheGirlCanSkate View Post
    She is unhappy when she doesn't have sports. Both physically and mentally. I think she will always have to be physically busy.

    She says she wants to coach skating, be an ornithologist, artist and mathematician. You know all the things kids what to be!
    Just because she skates doesn't mean she has to compete. Skating is still an expensive sport if you count private lessons and skates/blades and such. But competing makes it much more expensive with the choreography and costumes and fees.

    My fiance gets very very grumpy if he doesn't skateboard on a regular basis. So he just goes out to a local skatepark and practices his tricks for a few hours every day when the weather permits. When he was young he thought he was invincible and got himself pretty hurt a few times, but now he's older and knows his limits. No rail tricks, obviously. But the physical activity and camaraderie with his skateboarding friends relaxes him.

    "Sports" can just be really any activity, it doesn't have to be structured if you either don't have the funds for it or if that's not what makes her happy.

  12. #32
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Atlanta
    Posts
    2,804
    vCash
    500
    Rep Power
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by TheGirlCanSkate View Post
    She is unhappy when she doesn't have sports. Both physically and mentally. I think she will always have to be physically busy.

    She says she wants to coach skating, be an ornithologist, artist and mathematician. You know all the things kids what to be!
    Ooh, I really wanted to be an ornithologist in 5th grade!! We had an assignment to find someone who did what it was that we wanted to do when we grew up and interview them, so I called up my local Wild Bird Center and found a local ornithologist. When I got to his house and found his garage filled with rows and rows of dressers, each filled with dead birds with their wings splayed out and eyes rolled back, that was the end of that

    Of course fifteen years later I had no problems with cutting up a real human body in grad school anatomy...

  13. #33
    Corgi Wrangler
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Not Wearing Enough Sparkles
    Posts
    6,362
    vCash
    510
    Rep Power
    2442
    Quote Originally Posted by AxelAnnie View Post


    Ditto!!!

    And so many gobs of money. Riding is much like skating (being a judged sport) - and is the only sport that requires two living souls, (one of whom can't speak) who at any given moment could be having an off day....making it more complex. Oh - and those horses are life long friends. I would choose (and did) horses any day. Both my kids rode, and some at my barn rode at the levels you are speaking of. Such fun!
    Well, the kind of horses you need for the Big Eq are less lifelong friends than 'hope you can get your $100,000+ investment back', and the GP horses belong to owners who have the money to campaign them. At the top of Juniors, you're already learning sponsors, owners, and resale value.

    When it comes to safety issues, though, I'd rather have a kid galloping at the track (exercise riding) than in hunters. Gambling means the sport's regulated a lot better, while hunter shows have people more needle-happy than your average heroin addict. As far as accidents, any time you're around horses, riding or not, there's a chance you're about to die, so that's kind of a wash no matter what discipline you pick. Racing where you've got trouble is maintaining your weight if you want to ride (I wasn't even old enough to gallop before I knew I would never be able to make weights), and finding a trainer to work up under if you want to train. (And accepting it's a business first, which I like about it as you don't run into as many sentimental hangups as with ammy owners.) Anything involving a horse, if you make the kid work for it (rather than middling-level hunters where the goal isn't a career, just having fun) will teach them to respect the animal, and to just accept that some days it is not going your way, and you will never get a reason because...its a horse. Horses teach you humility.

    Team sports honestly never even crossed my radar. I doubt I'd put much support or emphasis behind a kid doing any sort of team sport type of thing unless they were SO incredibly talented they realistically could go pro or get a full ride.

    Oooh...fencing is a good one. My cousin was big into it, but (at least back then) she would have had to move to New York (IIRC) to train seriously, and she went to engineering school instead.

  14. #34

    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Beijing, China
    Age
    34
    Posts
    12,638
    vCash
    500
    Rep Power
    11999
    Quote Originally Posted by TheGirlCanSkate View Post
    She is unhappy when she doesn't have sports. Both physically and mentally. I think she will always have to be physically busy.
    Right, but does she want to be an athlete? None of the things you listed require her to do an incredibly high level of a sport. If she wants to be a skating coach, depending on her age, she can possibly start that pretty early. If she doesn't want to be an athlete, let her do all the sports she wants within your budget. Consider only letting her compete up to a certain level, or within a certain region to keep the costs down. I think it's silly to spend a fortune on a sport just because it's liked - even if she's good at it, unless she wants to try and be an athlete. I'm unhappy if I don't have sport/exercise - it just means I do some every day, not at a high level, but it still is good for me.

  15. #35
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Posts
    460
    vCash
    500
    Rep Power
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by mkats View Post

    Of course fifteen years later I had no problems with cutting up a real human body in grad school anatomy...
    HA! She has met ornithologists and she has seen a lot of stuffed/dead birds. It's human blood makes her panic.

  16. #36

    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    New England, USA
    Posts
    5,795
    vCash
    470
    Rep Power
    3601
    Quote Originally Posted by Angelskates View Post
    Right, but does she want to be an athlete? None of the things you listed require her to do an incredibly high level of a sport. If she wants to be a skating coach, depending on her age, she can possibly start that pretty early. If she doesn't want to be an athlete, let her do all the sports she wants within your budget. Consider only letting her compete up to a certain level, or within a certain region to keep the costs down. I think it's silly to spend a fortune on a sport just because it's liked - even if she's good at it, unless she wants to try and be an athlete. I'm unhappy if I don't have sport/exercise - it just means I do some every day, not at a high level, but it still is good for me.
    Agree 100%. There's a gal in our area who plays golf at a very high level, as well or better than some pros on the Symetra tour. She HAS to play, as it's a big part of her life. For grins, she's happy to take $100 out of the pocket of any guy who thinks she "can't be all that good." Shes a doctor.
    AceOn6, the golf loving skating fan

  17. #37

    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Alabama
    Posts
    1,862
    vCash
    500
    Rep Power
    978
    Not sports, but I recommend ballet or tae kwon do; IMO, they're surprisingly similar because they both foster self-discipline, and both are strength and coordination-building activities that would complement any sport she decided to do.

    Also, the flexibility she would develop would help protect against sports-injuries she might develop (to a point; however, hyper-flexibilty can make her injury prone).
    Last edited by Wiery; 12-01-2012 at 09:08 PM.

  18. #38
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Location
    Oz, of course
    Posts
    11,355
    vCash
    500
    Rep Power
    0
    I'd steer her away from any sport where losing weight is frequently encouraged, so no skating, dance, or wrestling.

  19. #39
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Apr 2001
    Location
    Rejecting your reality and substituting my own
    Age
    30
    Posts
    10,878
    vCash
    500
    Rep Power
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by Angelskates View Post
    Right, but does she want to be an athlete? None of the things you listed require her to do an incredibly high level of a sport. If she wants to be a skating coach, depending on her age, she can possibly start that pretty early. If she doesn't want to be an athlete, let her do all the sports she wants within your budget. Consider only letting her compete up to a certain level, or within a certain region to keep the costs down. I think it's silly to spend a fortune on a sport just because it's liked - even if she's good at it, unless she wants to try and be an athlete. I'm unhappy if I don't have sport/exercise - it just means I do some every day, not at a high level, but it still is good for me.
    Yeah I'm a little befuddled why everyone jumping on the "serious athlete" bandwagon so soon.

    I loved to skate when I was in high school. Didn't have money for private lessons (let alone anything for comps or shows) so I just took group lessons and skated on public sessions. Never tested, never competed, but it was something I wanted to do for myself. My parents never supported me. In fact, my mom even criticized me one year for "wasting so much time skating" when I had no accomplishments to tout for it. In retrospect, I could have said the same thing about piano, which she put me into, because I never tested or competed in that either. We were never a sports-oriented family, and I think my sister and I turned out fine.

    It was just something I could do for me. And I did write about why I loved to skate for my college essay so that worked out in the end.

  20. #40
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Apr 2001
    Location
    Rejecting your reality and substituting my own
    Age
    30
    Posts
    10,878
    vCash
    500
    Rep Power
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by wickedwitch View Post
    I'd steer her away from any sport where losing weight is frequently encouraged, so no skating, dance, or wrestling.
    Or any sport where there are sparring competitions. My friend in tae kwon do made weight to spar. She learned it in college and was on the collegiate team, so it was mostly fun instead of competitive. (She has the wrong body type for seriously doing tae kwon do anyway - long legs and skinny frame are best!) But it still behooved her to make weight.

Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •