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  1. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by Marilou View Post
    In Thailand as well, as peanuts are a staple of the diet.
    Quote Originally Posted by jl22aries View Post
    But don't some allergies come from being exposed to certain foods at too young an age, when the system can't quite handle it, and so attacks the mystery foreign substance?
    Do a lot of Thai babies die from allergic reactions to peanuts?

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    What?! Anita....

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    Here's a link to one of the most prominent blogs on gluten-free cooking - she has tons of baking tips if you look through her archives:
    http://glutenfreegirl.com/

    And here are some arguments from a gluten-free diet proponent:
    http://www.marksdailyapple.com/why-g...#axzz26HTUvct9
    http://www.marksdailyapple.com/defin...#axzz26HTUvct9

    For what it's worth, eating gluten doesn't make me feel bad at all, however eliminating grain products like pasta, bread and rice helped me lose a lot of weight when nothing else worked.

  4. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by jl22aries View Post
    What?! Anita....
    It begs the question! There are certainly theories as to why there are so many food allergies now, but the fact that there is a culture where peanuts are a staple of the diet...how do they deal with it? Do they have increased numbers of people with peanut allergies since they're eating peanuts all the time? This is just something I have not heard and there's not a lot of statistics about it..

  5. #45
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    Mark Sisson has no formal education in nutrition or medicine and owns a nutritional supplements company. IOW, he is an amateur with a clear financial interest at stake.
    "Nature is a damp, inconvenient sort of place where birds and animals wander about uncooked."

    from Speedy Death

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    Quote Originally Posted by IceAlisa View Post
    Mark Sisson has no formal education in nutrition or medicine and owns a nutritional supplements company. IOW, he is an amateur with a clear financial interest at stake.
    Neither does Shauna James Ahern; she was an English teacher before she hit it big with Gluten-Free Girl. I used to read her blog and I really liked her when she was starting out and was so positive about finding new foods that made her happy and not trying to recreate what she ate before her diagnosis. But eventually her focus switched to GF baking, which doesn't interest me, and to monetizing her blog, with the quality of the posts dropping considerably (I'm certainly not opposed to bloggers making money off their blogs, just not a fan of her approach). So I'd say she has some financial interests in this, too.

  7. #47
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    I have to admit--these guys make me think I am in the wrong racket.
    "Nature is a damp, inconvenient sort of place where birds and animals wander about uncooked."

    from Speedy Death

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    Quote Originally Posted by IceAlisa View Post
    I have to admit--these guys make me think I am in the wrong racket.
    You can start a blog about your love for mango in its various forms! It hasn't become a fad yet so you can get a head start on everyone else

    (Don't forget to send me a check when you start making money off it)

    On a more serious note, I'm sure there are some great resources for people who need to eat gluten-free - it's just not something I've really had to look into, myself. As I wrote, I liked Shauna's earlier approach of just trying to find whatever tastes and feels great rather than what substitutes might work.

  9. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by Anita18 View Post
    It begs the question! There are certainly theories as to why there are so many food allergies now, but the fact that there is a culture where peanuts are a staple of the diet...how do they deal with it? Do they have increased numbers of people with peanut allergies since they're eating peanuts all the time? This is just something I have not heard and there's not a lot of statistics about it..
    From what I've read, it's actually the opposite. Thai children do not suffer from peanut allergies.

  10. #50
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    A nutritionist came to a local TV cooking show, saying gluten isn't the devil everyone makes it.
    A lot of the problems are caused because we eat just too much food with gluten in it, all the time (bread, cookies, pasta), that is too much even for a non celiac system to take it, so problems are bound to happen. According to her, letting go of gluten for a while, and eating less of it afterwards should solve the problem.

    I just went to a nose-throat-ear doctor yesterday, and he told me that my constant sinus problems could be due to a food sensitivity (gluten milk, tomatoes). I'm a bit skeptical, but what the heck, it's just a a blood test. Of course he also requested a CT of my sinus to check for problems.
    Dá-lhe, Isadora!!
    Lead me not into temptation. I can find it, and eat it, all by myself.

  11. #51
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    What is interesting is that allergies come from repeated exposure to something. So, as certain foods become popular in our diet, allergic reactions to that food increase. When corn and corn by-products started appearing in everything, corn allergies rose. Peanut allergies are very prevalent here because peanuts started to be in everything at some point in my childhood. Now that soy is in everything, I expect it to be the next big allergen.

    However, it's believed that if babies are exposed to things in utero, they are less likely to be allergic to it later so maybe in Thailand the babies are okay because everyone eats peanuts all the time.

    Or not. We don't have the best understanding of allergies (and the fact that sensitivities and intolerances have similar symptoms but different mechanisms blurs things).
    Actual bumper sticker series: Jesus is my co-pilot. Satan is my financial advisor. Budha is my therapist. L. Ron Hubbard owes me $50.

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    Quote Originally Posted by beepbeep View Post
    A nutritionist came to a local TV cooking show, saying gluten isn't the devil everyone makes it.
    A lot of the problems are caused because we eat just too much food with gluten in it, all the time (bread, cookies, pasta), that is too much even for a non celiac system to take it, so problems are bound to happen. According to her, letting go of gluten for a while, and eating less of it afterwards should solve the problem.

    I just went to a nose-throat-ear doctor yesterday, and he told me that my constant sinus problems could be due to a food sensitivity (gluten milk, tomatoes). I'm a bit skeptical, but what the heck, it's just a a blood test. Of course he also requested a CT of my sinus to check for problems.
    For me, this wasn't the case. I didn't eat a ton of bread to begin with and after going gluten-free for a number of months, tried to reintroduce it into my diet. The symptoms actually became worse. However, I also went dairy-free and egg-free for a while and had no trouble when I reintroduced them into my diet in moderation.

  13. #53
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    Quote Originally Posted by Marilou View Post
    For me, this wasn't the case. I didn't eat a ton of bread to begin with and after going gluten-free for a number of months, tried to reintroduce it into my diet. The symptoms actually became worse.
    Me, too. I think it's different for everyone.

    One of the problems with food intolerances is that there generally isn't a test and a lot of people don't recognize a problem if there isn't a test result to confirm it. This even includes doctors. When my celiac test came back negative, I had a doctor even ask me if I really did have hives. (Her physican's assistant had treated me for mulitple, big, bad hives and it had become a chronic problem at that point.) That was what I could see from the outside, and I worried about what was going on in the inside.

  14. #54
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    I have an intolerance to gluten that has made life very difficult at times. Unfortunately it is not just bread, pasta, and baked goods. There are so many items that being gluten free is like taking on another full time job.

  15. #55
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    Quote Originally Posted by MacMadame View Post
    What is interesting is that allergies come from repeated exposure to something. So, as certain foods become popular in our diet, allergic reactions to that food increase. When corn and corn by-products started appearing in everything, corn allergies rose. Peanut allergies are very prevalent here because peanuts started to be in everything at some point in my childhood. Now that soy is in everything, I expect it to be the next big allergen.

    However, it's believed that if babies are exposed to things in utero, they are less likely to be allergic to it later so maybe in Thailand the babies are okay because everyone eats peanuts all the time.

    Or not. We don't have the best understanding of allergies (and the fact that sensitivities and intolerances have similar symptoms but different mechanisms blurs things).
    I've heard the opposite about being exposed to allergens in utero. I don't think it's clear. It kind of went with the evidence that the presence of cats in the household is protective against childhood asthma. Go !

    I can say one thing: in the old country there was an odd food allergy here and there but not even close to as prevalent as they are here. Same for atopic disease in general. A majority of babies and young kids I know have or had had eczema at some point. Some have grown out of it, some have not.

    One of our posters here sent me a very interesting presentation about their theory why the rise of atopic disease may be taking place.


    Quote Originally Posted by Zemgirl View Post
    You can start a blog about your love for mango in its various forms! It hasn't become a fad yet so you can get a head start on everyone else

    (Don't forget to send me a check when you start making money off it)
    Mango is glorious. Unfortunately, or fortunately, FSU takes up most of the energy I have for online activity. I should add that I had just polished off a few slices of dried mango Just Mango from Trader Joe's. One of my favorite little cafes: http://www.mangomedley.com/home
    "Nature is a damp, inconvenient sort of place where birds and animals wander about uncooked."

    from Speedy Death

  16. #56
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    Quote Originally Posted by IceAlisa View Post
    I've heard the opposite about being exposed to allergens in utero.
    I've also heard the opposite but not based on science so much. Like I've heard pregnant women say they aren't going to eat peanuts during their pregnancy but it's not like they read a study and made that decision. It was their personal pet theory. Or maybe it was their OB's pet theory.
    Actual bumper sticker series: Jesus is my co-pilot. Satan is my financial advisor. Budha is my therapist. L. Ron Hubbard owes me $50.

  17. #57
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    Are you saying that the notion of exposure to allergens in utero as protective against allergens is based on science? I am interested in seeing the studies!

    I've heard of this being the case, but after birth, that essentially our modern environment is too clean and that's why there is a lower incidence of atopy among farm kids (not sure if that's supported) who are exposed to all kinds of animal- and plant-based allergies.
    "Nature is a damp, inconvenient sort of place where birds and animals wander about uncooked."

    from Speedy Death

  18. #58
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    Quote Originally Posted by IceAlisa View Post
    Are you saying that the notion of exposure to allergens in utero as protective against allergens is based on science? I am interested in seeing the studies!
    I read them when I was pregnant and my youngest is turning 14 next month. So it's not like I've got them bookmarked (assuming they are even on the internet, of course). But I bet if you went to PubMed, you'd find something.
    Actual bumper sticker series: Jesus is my co-pilot. Satan is my financial advisor. Budha is my therapist. L. Ron Hubbard owes me $50.

  19. #59

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    Have any GF people tried "C4C"? It's a new flour I saw on Martha Stewart's show.

    Most GF baked goods are either horrifyingly bad or super high in calories, so I'm skeptical when anyone claims to have created something just like wheat flour.

    I did have these cookies the other day, by WOW, that were super soft and yummy.
    http://www.wowbaking.com/products/grocery-box/

    These are also great:
    http://www.midelcookies.com/products...e/ginger-snaps

    As are these:
    http://www.amazon.com/Kinnikinnick-C...pr_product_top

    They are actually a bit softer than real oreos, go figure.

    As I never did much backing, what I find hardest is substitutes for flour in soups, sauces and frying things.

    Going grain free totally is probably a great idea...it's just really hard!
    Keeper of Nathalie Pechelat's bitchface.

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    My experience with gluten-free baking is that if you get a recipe that is naturally gluten-free, it can be delicious. If you get one that has been doctored up from a wheat flour recipe, it can be pretty gross.

    If I'm baking for someone who can't have gluten, I make my almond pound cake recipe that uses almond flour. It's to die for!
    Actual bumper sticker series: Jesus is my co-pilot. Satan is my financial advisor. Budha is my therapist. L. Ron Hubbard owes me $50.

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