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  1. #21

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    Quote Originally Posted by Spinner View Post
    I don't think your Nook books will transfer to a Kindle since they're not the same file format, so any books you have and want to keep you'll have to re-buy on the Kindle. If you want to upgrade your device, check out the Nook Glowlight first before you decide.
    You'd have to strip the DRM and convert the files to mobi. This is doable, but it can be a hassle and the legality of it is iffy.

  2. #22

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    Quote Originally Posted by Michalle View Post
    I don't mind as much when it's about people who are long-dead... it's more when the people still have friends/family living or are living themselves that it bothers me. I know it's a really established thing, and that a lot of people like it, but for some reason it really disturbs me.
    I love Timothy Findlay's books, but Famous Last Words bothered me a lot for that reason. I had to read it in university, and only now it occurs to me that I've instinctively avoided fiction that does that ever since. I don't even read historical fiction about real people (i.e., Phillipa Gregory).

    However, I'm a bit of a hypocrite since I do still like Shakespeare's Richard III.

  3. #23
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    You'll like it even better if they locate his grave. Richard's that is. A team of archaeologists are attempting to do so now. They plan to move any remains to a more prestigious resting place.
    Adelina Sotnikova defeated the curse of Esta She is indeed the Greatest Of All Time!

  4. #24
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    For those who like nonfiction, I recommend The Worst Hard Time: The Untold Story of Those Who Survived the Great American Dust Bowl by Timothy Egan. I've read only a little, but it's fascinating. I've heard Dust Bowl stories all my life and read some about those times, but never thought of it as being the greatest environmental disaster in U.S. history. I'm glad to be reading now since Ken Burns' new film about the Dust Bowl airs on PBS soon. November, I think.

  5. #25

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    Quote Originally Posted by rfisher View Post
    You'll like it even better if they locate his grave. Richard's that is. A team of archaeologists are attempting to do so now. They plan to move any remains to a more prestigious resting place.

  6. #26

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    I never heard. I am Baku Azerbaijan..... One of the 10 top cities for night life. I guess Who knew?
    DH - and that's just my opinion

  7. #27

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    I finished "Shakespear Undead" this morning and have plunged directly into "Zombie Island." The concept is a hoot. I hope there are more to the series.
    "You just can't underestimate the power of positive underwear." 2013 Fruit of the Loom ad

  8. #28
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    I enjoy Louise Penny's novels, but my parents are even bigger fans. They've read all of them and were eagerly awaiting her new novel. I saw that she was doing a book tour for the new novel, and I asked my parents if they'd like to attend. We had to drive 2 and 1/2 hours and stay overnight, but they really wanted to go.

    I'm glad to say the appearance was even better than they expected. Ms Penny was charming, witty, warm and all around lovely. Her talk was wonderful and you left feeling like you'd spent the night with a good friend. I took a picture of my parents talking to her while they got their books signed, and my dad had the sweetest smile and an expression of pure delight.

    Two of my friends lost one of their parents in the last few weeks, and both my parents have had recent health challenges. I'm so happy that they had such a good night and that I was able to help them meet one of their favorite authors. Books can be such a good bonding experience.
    "The Devil is joining in, and that's never a good sign." Phil Liggett

  9. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by Garden Kitty View Post
    Two of my friends lost one of their parents in the last few weeks, and both my parents have had recent health challenges. I'm so happy that they had such a good night and that I was able to help them meet one of their favorite authors. Books can be such a good bonding experience.
    It's wonderful that you were able to do this with your parents.

    I recently read my first Inspector Gamache novel and enjoyed it very much. I'll be looking for more.

  10. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by kwanfan1818 View Post
    I think it was in Duberman in his bio of Lincoln Kirstein, although it could have been in one of the Jerome Robbins bios -- Robbins and Leclercq were great friends -- who wrote that Leclercq was in the process of separating from Balanchine amicably right before the European tour, so the husband's infidelity angle -- Balanchine stayed with her for over a decade after she contracted polio -- is O'Connor's own fiction, which she would have known had she done that bit of basic research.
    I haven't yet read O'Connor's book, The Master's Muse, but I hope it is well written. I also look forward to seeing how much O'Connor "invents" in her effort to delve beneath the facts of Le Clercq's life and relationship with Balanchine to uncover emotional truths. However, I think it is quite clear that O'Connor conducted thorough research (which is also acknowledged in the review link I previously posted).

    Just because Balanchine and Le Clercq parted amicably does not mean that Le Clercq was emotionally unaffected by their parting. Actually, it isn't a secret that Balanchine had many wives, and that his eye and attention would eventually stray to a new muse, and that is largely why his marriages ended. A former dancer with Balanchine's New York City Ballet, Bart Cook, is quoted as saying that Balanchine seemed to be "married to the idea, the abstraction of the ballerina archetype."

    http://www.azcentral.com/thingstodo/...0503women.html

    Balanchine and Le Clercq were showing signs of strain in their marriage sometime before Le Clercq was stricken with polio. And, from anecdotes in the public domain (see the Holly Brubach review of O'Connor's book), Balanchine felt responsible for Le Clercq's fate. As a friend of Tannaquil Le Clercq's, Holly Brubach also admits in the previously posted review link (http://www.nytimes.com/2012/02/19/t-...pagewanted=all) that some of O'Connor's passages dealing with the complications of the B/L marriage after Le Clercq was confined to a wheelchair, have the "ring of emotional truth."

    Balanchine and Le Clercq divorced soon after Balanchine became fascinated with his newest muse, Suzanne Farrell. Obviously, that does not mean Balanchine was "unfaithful" to Le Clercq in the sense of having an affair, but clearly another young dancer had become the object of his devotion. Eventually, Balanchine desired to marry Farrell, but didn't because Farrell was unwilling; she fell in love with another dancer, Paul Mejia.

  11. #31
    I <3 Kozuka
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    Duberman's book and the two Robbins books are the three relatively recent major works of dance-related biography. They were there for her to use. I don't doubt that O'Connor did research her book; whether she used them as sources or skipped them, that she went with her own narrative, reportedly autobiographical, is one of the reasons I'm not tempted by her book.

    Balanchine had many muses with whom he did not have relationships.
    "'Is this new BMW-designed sled the ultimate sledding machine for Langdon and Holcomb?' Leigh Diffey asked before the pair cruised to victory. I don’t know, but I know that sled is the ultimate Olympic Games product placement.." -- Jen Chaney

  12. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by kwanfan1818 View Post
    Duberman's book and the two Robbins books are the three relatively recent major works of dance-related biography. They were there for her to use. I don't doubt that O'Connor did research her book; whether she used them as sources or skipped them, that she went with her own narrative, reportedly autobiographical, is one of the reasons I'm not tempted by her book.

    Balanchine had many muses with whom he did not have relationships.
    I also previously linked O'Connor's defense of her fictionalized approach. I find O'Connor's comments compelling in regard to why she was intrigued by Tanaquil Le Clercq's life, and why she decided not to write a biography. I don't think O'Connor's fictionalized account of Tanaquil Le Clercq's relationship with Balanchine is autobiographical, just that some of the things Le Clercq experienced resonated with O'Connor and captured her imagination.

    Definitely Balanchine had many muses, among them Darci Kistler, and Merrill Ashley (who wrote the wonderful book, Dancing for Balanchine). I think it's safe to say that Balanchine had devotional, mutual love for ballet "relationships" with all of the female dancers who captured his attention, and he ended up marrying quite a few who were his major muses, except for Farrell and except for those who became his major muses during his later years. A few of Balanchine's dancers, both male and female, shared a close friendship with him.
    Last edited by aftershocks; 09-09-2012 at 06:53 AM.

  13. #33

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    I got through half of Nevada Barr's 13 1/2 and just realized it isn't a Anna Pigeon book. /shuffle.

    I haven't decided if I will finish. I kinda want to find out what happens and I think the plot is interesting but the writing kind of plods along heavily.
    Figure skating is hard.

  14. #34

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    Thanks to rfisher for recommending Midnight Riot; I'm reading it now and really enjoying it.

  15. #35
    Ma name's Beckeh.
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    Joyce Carol Oates is releasing a historical fiction novel next March called The Accursed. Looks nice and creepy.

    Quote Originally Posted by Library Journal
    At the turn of the 20th century, strange things start happening in peaceful, polished Princeton, NJ. Folks dream about vampires, the daughters of the town’s classiest families start vanishing, and a bride-to-be runs away with a vaguely menacing European, presumably a prince and possibly the Devil.
    Roll Tide, y'all!

  16. #36

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    Joyce Carol Oats is one of those writers where I feel I should get something out of her books, and I just don't. Her books are very workman-like to me. Pathos goes here. Three dimensional characters go here. Oppressive scenery/town there. She's COP for literature IMO, right down to the backloading at the end in her writing style.
    "The practice of sport is a human right. Every individual must have the possibility of practicing sport, without discrimination of any kind and in the Olympic spirit, which requires mutual understanding with a spirit of friendship, solidarity and fair play." –Olympic Charter

  17. #37

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    Quote Originally Posted by Matryeshka View Post
    Joyce Carol Oats is one of those writers where I feel I should get something out of her books, and I just don't. Her books are very workman-like to me. Pathos goes here. Three dimensional characters go here. Oppressive scenery/town there. She's COP for literature IMO, right down to the backloading at the end in her writing style.
    I agree. I can't think of a book of hers that I've actually enjoyed, but then I stopped reading them a long time ago.

    I'm finished with vampires for a bit now and moving back to a couple of cozy mysteries I 've had sitting around. I need a little less blood and mayhem in my life this week.
    "You just can't underestimate the power of positive underwear." 2013 Fruit of the Loom ad

  18. #38
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    I rarely listen to NPR anymore, and I didn't know until today about the controversy about their reader-suggested "best Young Adult fiction" list, in which all but three books have white protagonists:

    http://www.salon.com/2012/09/10/whos...rce=newsletter

    Hilary Mantel's historical fiction about Anne Boleyn, "Bring Up the Bodies" made the short list for the Booker Prize, and is currently 2/1 odds to be a repeat winner.
    http://www.cbc.ca/news/world/story/2...shortlist.html

    The other five short-listed books are:
    "The Garden of Evening Mists", Tan Twan Eng (Malaysia)
    "Narcopolis", Jeet Thayil (India)
    "Self's Umbrella", Will Self (GB)
    "Swimming Home", Deborah Levy (GB)
    "The Lighthouse", Alison Moore (GB)
    "'Is this new BMW-designed sled the ultimate sledding machine for Langdon and Holcomb?' Leigh Diffey asked before the pair cruised to victory. I don’t know, but I know that sled is the ultimate Olympic Games product placement.." -- Jen Chaney

  19. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by Matryeshka View Post
    Joyce Carol Oats is one of those writers where I feel I should get something out of her books, and I just don't. Her books are very workman-like to me. Pathos goes here. Three dimensional characters go here. Oppressive scenery/town there. She's COP for literature IMO, right down to the backloading at the end in her writing style.
    ^^ Ahhh, Joyce Carol Oates, the prolific, all-consuming literary meister! I'm more familiar with her earlier books, many of which I was introduced to in college. There is something about the contradiction between JCO's meek-seeming persona and her violent angst-ridden subject matter that I find compelling.

    I enjoyed reading the biography of JCO: Invisible Writer, by Greg Johnson. I got a lot out of JCO's Them, Bellefleur, Do With Me What You Will, and her short story, Where are you going? Where have you been? (made into the movie Smooth Talk with Laura Dern and Treat Williams).

    Might JCO and Toni Morrison be somewhat comparable in their imaginative intensity and singular desire to write for themselves. Neither likely care a hoot what others think ... Altho' JCO's prose is often wordy and dense, and Morrison's prose can be rich and dense, they are both masters of the writing art.
    Last edited by aftershocks; 09-11-2012 at 06:28 PM.

  20. #40
    Ma name's Beckeh.
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    I haven't read the Salon article yet, but I wouldn't be surprised if most NPR listeners are white so it makes sense to me that their favorite books would have white main characters. When I read young adult fiction, it's usually because it's familiar and almost comforting. If I want to 'expand my horizons', I generally read adult fiction. Of course, I may be missing the point of NPR's list so I'll go read the article.

    Re: the Booker Prize shortlist. I'm glad The Unlikely Pilgrimage of Harold Fry didn't make it. I only made it through the first few pages. Yuck...

    Quote Originally Posted by Matryeshka View Post
    Joyce Carol Oats is one of those writers where I feel I should get something out of her books, and I just don't. Her books are very workman-like to me. Pathos goes here. Three dimensional characters go here. Oppressive scenery/town there. She's COP for literature IMO, right down to the backloading at the end in her writing style.
    I've only read a short story of hers and liked it pretty well so hopefully I'll enjoy the book despite its likely flaws.
    Roll Tide, y'all!

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