Page 1 of 52 1231151 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 1025
  1. #1
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Diagonally parked in a parallel universe.
    Posts
    4,776
    vCash
    500
    Rep Power
    0

    Books moral and immoral

    "There is no such thing as a moral or an immoral book. Books are well written, or badly written." ~ Oscar Wilde

    We hit 1000 post on the previous book thread ... so here's a new one. Hope y'all are ok with the title.

  2. #2
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Diagonally parked in a parallel universe.
    Posts
    4,776
    vCash
    500
    Rep Power
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by rfisher
    All my fellow Potter fans need to read Ben Aaronovitch's Midnight Riot. To quote one reviewer, "Midnight Riot is what would happen if Harry Potter grew up and joined the fuzz. A hilarous, keenly imagined caper."
    That sounds right up my alley! Just checked my two local libraries and neither has is, will have to investigate other sources. Thanks for the tip.

  3. #3
    Just me
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Location
    no place special
    Posts
    6,761
    vCash
    9350
    Rep Power
    1820
    I finished The Dig by Michael Siemsen about a week ago. This is the author's first book (I think) and I will be interested in reading more from him. It's difficult to pigeon-hole this book into a category, but I the more I read, the more time I wanted to spend with the ninteen-year-old central character.
    If this is to end in fire
    Then we will all burn together

  4. #4
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Posts
    461
    vCash
    500
    Rep Power
    0
    Shades of Grey by Jasper Fforde - Still working through it, but it's a future society that 's hierarchy is based on what colors you can see. The highest order are purples and the lowliest is grey. It's an interesting world where items from the past are made int o synthetic color and with bizarre rules that no one can remember or question. Oddly, the many rules keep each citizen ready to figure out a loophole.

  5. #5

    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Location
    with the traditionless
    Posts
    5,616
    vCash
    500
    Rep Power
    8583
    Quote Originally Posted by TheGirlCanSkate View Post
    Shades of Grey by Jasper Fforde - Still working through it, but it's a future society that 's hierarchy is based on what colors you can see. The highest order are purples and the lowliest is grey. It's an interesting world where items from the past are made int o synthetic color and with bizarre rules that no one can remember or question. Oddly, the many rules keep each citizen ready to figure out a loophole.
    That sounds interesting since I just heard that some people can see more shades of color than most of the rest of us.

    Regarding the Nevada Barr criticism from the last thread, when did she “go bad”? I am reading 13 ½ right now and that was a 2009 release. We haven’t gotten to any Anna yet, but I like it so far.
    What would Jenny do?

  6. #6
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Posts
    461
    vCash
    500
    Rep Power
    0
    What is also fascinating is that color doesn't exist anywhere but in our brains. http://www.askamathematician.com/201...-colors-exist/

  7. #7
    Bountifully Enmeshed
    Join Date
    Apr 2001
    Location
    At the Christmas Bizarre
    Posts
    38,154
    vCash
    250
    Rep Power
    46687
    Quote Originally Posted by Artemis@BC View Post
    Hope y'all are ok with the title.
    We'll probably get a lot more traffic.
    "The secret to creativity is knowing how to hide your sources."-- Albert Einstein.

  8. #8
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Diagonally parked in a parallel universe.
    Posts
    4,776
    vCash
    500
    Rep Power
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by Prancer View Post
    We'll probably get a lot more traffic.
    Yes, that did cross my mind ...

  9. #9
    snarking for AZE
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    katbert greenhouse
    Posts
    30,164
    vCash
    2068
    Rep Power
    50005
    wouldnt southpaw let you borrow "50 shades of kiss my ass"
    I feel like I'm in a dream. But it can't be a dream because there are no boy dancers!

  10. #10
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Posts
    4,340
    vCash
    500
    Rep Power
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by Artemis@BC View Post
    "There is no such thing as a moral or an immoral book. Books are well written, or badly written." ~ Oscar Wilde

    We hit 1000 post on the previous book thread ... so here's a new one. Hope y'all are ok with the title.
    Wow, how timely. I was going to start a new thread to discuss the below, but this looks like the place to post, since this thread is about books, and the thread title also seems strangely fitting. Therefore, what do others think re the hot topic of novelizing the experiences of real people, rather than writing a biography? Forgive me if this book has already been discussed.

    The book: The Master's Muse, by Varley O'Connor is a novelization of the relationship between George Balanchine and Tanaquil Le Clercq. As a Balanchine aficionado and a lover of ballet, I immediately reserved this book at my local library, and I'm looking forward to eventually attending a book discussion presented by the author.

    Meanwhile I looked up reviews and found this one, "Dancing Around the Truth," by Holly Brubach in The New York Times.

    http://www.nytimes.com/2012/02/19/t-...pagewanted=all

    Since Brubach apparently became a friend of Le Clercq's sometime after Le Clercq had contracted polio and become wheelchair-bound, Brubach's perspective is obviously different from that of a more objective dance history/ ballet history journalist who might know something about the Balanchine/ Le Clercq saga without having known either of them intimately.

    After reading Brubach's review, I marked down one of my questions to ask the author: Why did you decide to novelize Le Clercq's and Balanchine's story rather than writing a biography? After looking up information on author O'Connor, I found that she has already answered this question in a PW blog post:

    http://www.publishersweekly.com/pw/b...n-fiction.html

    I gained a lot from reading both Brubach's review and O'Connor's response. Brubach did acknowledge that O'Connor had obviously done thorough research, and Brubach also gave O'Connor credit for occasionally being "right" about "emotional truths." But Brubach admonishes O'Connor for getting "major plot points wrong," and for "violating" Le Clercq's privacy by having the audacity to write in the first person, in effect "inviting total strangers to spend 244 pages inside [Tanny's] mind — a place that was off-limits even to her closest friends."

    I think O'Connor's response is very effective in its sincerity and honesty about how and why she was captivated by Le Clercq's life. O'Connor is a fiction writer (and a former actor) and the subjects of dealing with polio and dealing with a husband's betrayal have great resonance for her in her own life. Kind of fascinating to reflect upon O'Connor's contention: "What novels do that biographies don’t is get at truths by penetrating the facts, by going deeper to what’s underneath fact, through invention."

    I am looking forward to reading O'Connor's book. Ultimately what matters is whether or not it is well written. In being inspired by Le Clercq's story, O'Connor may have created a work of art that is worthy in its own right. And surely readers of O'Connor's book will also want to find out more about the real Tanaquil Le Clercq, and about Balanchine and The New York City Ballet. That would be a good thing. Even better might be Holly Brubach or another gifted writer being inspired to write a biography of Tanaquil Le Clercq.

    Of course I can't know with certainty, but perhaps Le Clercq would not mind O'Connor's audacity (especially since the intrusion into and novelization of Le Clercq's life has not occurred for sensationalist reasons). Since Le Clercq has already lived her life, surely the lessons and inspirations her life imparts should no longer be "off-limits."

  11. #11
    Bountifully Enmeshed
    Join Date
    Apr 2001
    Location
    At the Christmas Bizarre
    Posts
    38,154
    vCash
    250
    Rep Power
    46687
    The new Kindles are out: http://www.cnn.com/2012/09/06/tech/m...dmn_topstories

    The new Michael Chabon looks rather interesting: http://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/tele...=9780062124609
    "The secret to creativity is knowing how to hide your sources."-- Albert Einstein.

  12. #12
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Diagonally parked in a parallel universe.
    Posts
    4,776
    vCash
    500
    Rep Power
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by Prancer View Post
    And Kobo just announced 3 new editions: the Glo (with backlight), the Mini (smaller, duh), and the Arc (a tabled edition obviously designed to compete with Kindle Fire).

    Meanwhile I'm still waiting for the Kobo Touch I won last month to arrive ...

  13. #13
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Posts
    923
    vCash
    500
    Rep Power
    0
    I don't understand why novelists who take real people's lives as inspiration just don't give fictional names to the characters they create. Why does the character have to be called Tanaquil LeClerq, if it's an imagined version of the relationship? For me, it's disrespectful. By all means, it's an interesting relationship and scenario, but once it is fiction it is not about the real person, and the author should acknowledge that by making up a name for their character. I am a hard-liner about this, for whatever reason. I just think that people like Oliver Stone, for example, would be the first to flip out if someone made a movie called "Oliver!" about a filmmaker named Oliver Stone who does a lot of stuff that Oliver Stone never did. And the same for Curtis Sittenfeld, if someone wrote a book called "Curtis Sittenfeld's Story." I know that the argument is that once someone is famous, they are in the "public domain," so to speak, but I don't like it. I suppose 100 years from now, no one will care and it won't make a difference - I definitely don't get up in arms about Henry V, but it just seems so mean to me. It's a strange hang-up, I guess.

    Edit: I guess the other reason it bothers me is that I feel like the decision to use the actual name is basically a way to capitalize on that person's fame and accomplishments, or notoriety, rather than an artistic decision - obviously, it will be more marketable that way.

  14. #14

    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Location
    Vancouver Canada
    Age
    55
    Posts
    12,706
    vCash
    500
    Rep Power
    11163
    Quote Originally Posted by Michalle View Post
    I don't understand why novelists who take real people's lives as inspiration just don't give fictional names to the characters they create.
    In the case of historical fiction, often enough is known about the character, story and historical context about it to use the character's real name. Philippa Gregory's novels immediately come to mind - her books about the King Henry XIII's first wife, the Boleyn sisters, and Jane Seymour gave readers a fascinating glimpse of what their lives might really have been like IMO.

  15. #15
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Posts
    923
    vCash
    500
    Rep Power
    0
    I don't mind as much when it's about people who are long-dead... it's more when the people still have friends/family living or are living themselves that it bothers me. I know it's a really established thing, and that a lot of people like it, but for some reason it really disturbs me. It's sort of like those stories (is this true or just a myth?) of people who didn't want their photograph to be taken because they thought it would steal their soul. I have a degree in creative writing and lots of friends who are writers, and it still bothers me! Maybe it bothers me more because I am a writer and it's not my approach, I guess.

  16. #16

    Join Date
    Jul 2001
    Age
    33
    Posts
    4,866
    vCash
    500
    Rep Power
    4947
    Quote Originally Posted by Michalle View Post
    And the same for Curtis Sittenfeld, if someone wrote a book called "Curtis Sittenfeld's Story."
    I'm not sure why you bring her in as an example, since Sittenfeld did change the names of the people whose lives she based American Wife on. She didn't exactly disguise them well, but all you asked was that she give fictional names, which she did.

    And since parts of Prep seem to be loosely based on her own life, she basically did the same thing to her own life.

  17. #17
    Ma name's Beckeh.
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Location
    Room 101
    Posts
    1,922
    vCash
    500
    Rep Power
    1024
    The new Kindle Paperwhite looks amazing. I may get one even though I already have (and love) a Nook Simple Touch. I especially like the Time to Read and X-Ray features and the ability to search Wikipedia. The only con I see is that I'm not wild about the available fonts.

    http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/AS...themillions-20
    Roll Tide, y'all!

  18. #18
    I <3 Kozuka
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Vancouver/Seattle
    Posts
    19,175
    vCash
    730
    Rep Power
    43796
    I think it was in Duberman in his bio of Lincoln Kirstein, although it could have been in one of the Jerome Robbins bios -- Robbins and Leclercq were great friends -- who wrote that Leclercq was in the process of separating from Balanchine amicably right before the European tour, so the husband's infidelity angle -- Balanchine stayed with her for over a decade after she contracted polio -- is O'Connor's own fiction, which she would have known had she done that bit of basic research.
    "The team doesn't get automatic capacity because management is mad" -- Greg Smith, agile guy

  19. #19
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Dec 2001
    Location
    Chicago
    Age
    42
    Posts
    3,725
    vCash
    500
    Rep Power
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by galaxygirl View Post
    The new Kindle Paperwhite looks amazing. I may get one even though I already have (and love) a Nook Simple Touch. I especially like the Time to Read and X-Ray features and the ability to search Wikipedia. The only con I see is that I'm not wild about the available fonts.
    I don't think your Nook books will transfer to a Kindle since they're not the same file format, so any books you have and want to keep you'll have to re-buy on the Kindle. If you want to upgrade your device, check out the Nook Glowlight first before you decide.

  20. #20
    Ma name's Beckeh.
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Location
    Room 101
    Posts
    1,922
    vCash
    500
    Rep Power
    1024
    Quote Originally Posted by Spinner View Post
    I don't think your Nook books will transfer to a Kindle since they're not the same file format, so any books you have and want to keep you'll have to re-buy on the Kindle. If you want to upgrade your device, check out the Nook Glowlight first before you decide.
    I mostly read library books so I should be okay and I'd keep my Nook as a backup. I had looked at the Nook Glowlight previously but it apparently has had some screen issues. Of course it's possible that the Kindle will have issues too.

    Amazon really does know how to market their stuff. If I were basing my purchasing decision solely on the product pages for the Nook and the Kindle, the Kindle would win, hands down.
    Roll Tide, y'all!

Page 1 of 52 1231151 ... LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •