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  1. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by skatingfan5 View Post
    I never would have guessed that greyhounds would be that way (needing to be muzzled). A greyhound rescue group has a booth once a month at the local farmer's market and they usually have two or three of their dogs present. I realize that the dogs placed with adoptive families likely have been "tested" for their aggressiveness towards other animals and children, but these have been some of the sweetest, most laid-back dogs I have ever been around. Having been bitten by dogs in the past (once as a small child, once while delivering the mail on a summer college job), I'm not naturally a "dog person" but I have loved visiting with the greyhounds whenever they have been at the market. Mostly they haven't been on leashes, but of course, this is quite different from having them run free at a dog park.
    Greyhounds are like pit bulls--they were bred to a purpose, and in their case it involves attacking movement. They're mostly bred to race or show now, but they're a coursing sight hound--they see something move, instinct says chase it down and grab it. Not a problem when it's the fake rabbit on the track, big problem when it's a cat or a small child. All the sight hounds can be set off by motion, it's what they do.

    And ANY dog, regardless of breed, can become dangerously "dog-aggressive", for lack of a better term, when they get into a situation with another dog where they feel threatened or provoked.

    Personally, I rarely blame the dog (the one time I was bitten as a child, it was a weimeraner, it caught me on the lip, and my mother reamed me out for getting in the dog's face after I was specifically told by her to leave the dog alone. My fault for provoking it, like the one major horse bite I've gotten was my bad for not paying attention.) You put a bunch of dogs in a big mix like a dog park, eventually someone's going to get in a fight. Hence my thinking dog parks are stupid ideas--my dogs are not children in need of "play dates" or a nursery school.

  2. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by danceronice View Post
    ...You put a bunch of dogs in a big mix like a dog park, eventually someone's going to get in a fight. Hence my thinking dog parks are stupid ideas--my dogs are not children in need of "play dates" or a nursery school.
    Yes, I am beginning to realize this. Lots of good advice here. This dog park thing is new to me, I thought my dog loved other dogs, and for the most part she does, but certain types she does not go for and those are the small and weak. She LOVES huge dogs because they can play along with her playfighting or whateve it's called.

    I called the dog park office today. So far, after two days, they have had 3 email messages about the incident. They want to file a police report. They have to 'track down who it is' which is strange since they have my dog's name and information. What more do they need? I didnt tell them I was the dog owner.

  3. #43

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    Quote Originally Posted by Cupid View Post
    Yes, I am beginning to realize this. Lots of good advice here. This dog park thing is new to me, I thought my dog loved other dogs, and for the most part she does, but certain types she does not go for and those are the small and weak. She LOVES huge dogs because they can play along with her playfighting or whateve it's called.

    I called the dog park office today. So far, after two days, they have had 3 email messages about the incident. They want to file a police report. They have to 'track down who it is' which is strange since they have my dog's name and information. What more do they need? I didnt tell them I was the dog owner.
    Hate to say it but you might want to step forward and admit responsibility. You will do yourself more favours by giving yourself up rather than if they have to seek you out. And if there are penalities to be applied you could get a lesser one.
    When you are up to your arse in alligators it is difficult to remember you were only meant to be draining the swamp.

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    I want to know why (if you don't own a junkyard) would you want an aggressive breed for a pet? There are thousands of nice breeds in pounds around the country just begging for homes. I have never understood the rationale of adopting a rescue pit bull. How in the world could you ever trust that the dog wouldn't someday turn on you? At least when you have it from a puppy you could have a bit better idea how it acts. But you can't EVER totally trust it even then.

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    I'm sorry that that happened but that is also my worst nightmare. We just adopted a dachshund puppy mill rescue dog and the dog park has been good for her. I can leash train her while letting my other dog run around and do his thing--plus she loves being around dogs so just being there relaxes her.
    However the past couple of times we've run into dogs that have tried to pick her up or charge her. I usually can grab her right away since she's on the leash but it's nerve wracking. She's a sweet thing who just wants to be friends with everyone and these occurrences are making her much more wary of approaching other dogs. On the bright side it's making the leash training more effective--she's much more willing to follow me.
    And as far as pit bulls--there were two pit mixes at the park today and they were not a problem. There was one evening I was there with some friends and someone brought their pit bull in on a leash, and when it saw me it wanted to rip my face off. I should've told them that dog had no damn business being in the park at all. That same evening I saw from afar one dog take another down to the ground by it's throat, and the owners stood by, completely oblivious. They eventually separated the dogs and I think they were okay but really...how could they not notice the high pitched yelps? My golden was ready to handle the situation before they were.

  6. #46

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    Quote Originally Posted by Aussie Willy View Post
    Hate to say it but you might want to step forward and admit responsibility. You will do yourself more favours by giving yourself up rather than if they have to seek you out. And if there are penalities to be applied you could get a lesser one.
    Great advice. Going in and talking to them and explaining that your dog had always been
    fine with other dogs, that you are working with a trainor and you will not be bringing the dog to that park or any other will demonstrate that you arena responsible dog owner.

    Frankly, as an owner of a dog who is 82 lbs of dog agression, i would advise that you return the dog. Find a nice, gentle dog. My dog could pull me right off my feet if a truck
    should drive by with a dog barking out the window...and I am a tall woman. i am always on alert. We tried to give her back when this all started but they would not take her.

    She spent 5 weeks and we spent about $5,000 at a training facility where we learned how to manage her. And it isn't even that we can't let her run anywhere, or can't be on the lookout for other dogs..that we can do. The real problem is that an off leash dog can show up in the blink of an eye, and then my arm is out of the socket trying to hold her.
    Then there are the genius people with their dog on a leash who go out of their way...like crossing the path, as I am at a standstill with my dog in a down or sit, saying my dog doesn't like other dogs.....and they moronically reply.....well my dog just wants to say HI.

    So, if you have a few acres and don't need to venture out, that is one thing. Otherwise you arenin for a long road
    DH - and that's just my opinion

  7. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by AxelAnnie View Post
    Great advice. Going in and talking to them and explaining that your dog had always been
    fine with other dogs, that you are working with a trainor and you will not be bringing the dog to that park or any other will demonstrate that you arena responsible dog owner.

    Frankly, as an owner of a dog who is 82 lbs of dog agression, i would advise that you return the dog. Find a nice, gentle dog. My dog could pull me right off my feet if a truck
    should drive by with a dog barking out the window...and I am a tall woman. i am always on alert. We tried to give her back when this all started but they would not take her.

    She spent 5 weeks and we spent about $5,000 at a training facility where we learned how to manage her. And it isn't even that we can't let her run anywhere, or can't be on the lookout for other dogs..that we can do. The real problem is that an off leash dog can show up in the blink of an eye, and then my arm is out of the socket trying to hold her.
    Then there are the genius people with their dog on a leash who go out of their way...like crossing the path, as I am at a standstill with my dog in a down or sit, saying my dog doesn't like other dogs.....and they moronically reply.....well my dog just wants to say HI.

    So, if you have a few acres and don't need to venture out, that is one thing. Otherwise you arenin for a long road
    We got that with our adorable golden ALL. THE. TIME. "Oh, but look at that sweet face!" Not when he's ripping little Fluffy's throat out, bub.

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    My two cents worth about pit bulls is that I think they get an unnecessarily bad rap. Yes, it is true that they have been trained to be dog aggressive as fighting dogs. However, there is a lot of pit bull breeding done these days by people who have dogs with no lineage as fighters.

    Where I live there are pit bulls up for sale and for adoption from the SPCA and rescues constantly. I'm not in an upper income area so there are plenty of mixes, rescues, and pits or pit crosses at the off-leash park we go to. I have met more sweet and gentle pits than I can count.

    Yes, some are aggressive but I would say they are in minority. Meanwhile I have a golden retriever with dog aggression issues, but no one is ever afraid of her.

    Then, there are are people who teach pits to be human-aggressive - I've heard of gangs in the American South who consider their pit to be a gun substitute. . .
    Last edited by Japanfan; 08-17-2012 at 09:47 AM.

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    Wow - I feel sorry for you and I can see that you are trying to do the right thing, so I hope this doesnt come over as too harsh but...

    Realistically, you have a potentially dangerous dog who has already attacked another dog. You were told by a professional that your dog has "high prey instincts". These are big red flags.

    It's not enough to just avoid the dog park. That is a big strong dog. What are you going to do if you are walking her and she suddenly lunges at something small that catches her eye [this is her instinct kicking in - she cant help herself]. She will either pull the leash right out of your hand or drag you down the street after her.

    For everybody's safety - including your own - I strongly second the other posters who are telling you that dog needs to be muzzled in public. Your vet should be able to help you find a muzzle that is comfortable and secure - that she wont be able to break or get out of.

    I dont think this is that harsh on the dog - certainly better than never letting her out. I also agree with the suggestion of finding some acceptable and challenging exercise for her that doesnt involve aggression - like pulling weights. This should use up her extra energy in a constructive way.

    You said she likes to "play fight" with other dogs - STRONGLY DISCOURAGE THIS!!! That could turn into a real fight in seconds, and many people sue about everything these days. If I were you, I wouldnt take the chance. What would happen, for instance, if the other owner tried to defend his dog and your dog mauled him as well as his dog? These are all situations you just dont want to think about. Better to avoid them and keep her muzzled in public. At least that's what I'd do.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Cupid View Post
    I had to use my hands to release her mouth from the dog's neck.
    If it ever happens again (which I hope it doesn't), grab both of your dog's hind legs and pull them up gently.

    The dog will lose balance, become disoriented and release whatever it is holding in its mouth.

  11. #51
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    Dogs are pack animals just like wolves or wild dogs. This is one of the reasons they live with humans so well, as long as they see the humans as pack leaders or superiors. Cesar Milan is a showboat in many ways, but this mantra of his is spot on. In a pack, there is a constant shifting of position and testing for dominance. When two dogs meet, they do this even if we as humans aren't paying attention. Watch your dog's posture. If the two dog's are of similar size, they'll approach cautiously. If one dog is more subordinate, the more dominant dog will usually back down as soon as the sub shows submission. However, if two dominant dogs meet, the potential for conflict is much greater.

    I have never taken any of my dogs to a dog park. Way too much opportunity for problems and a problem avoided is a problem solved. And Axel Annie, if you put a pinch collar on your dog, you can contol her. It doesn't hurt the dog, but it gives you control. I'd suggest you try one.
    Those who never succeed themselves are always the first to tell you how.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Alex Forrest View Post
    Right, but good luck if that dog actually ends up attacking a human. I wouldn't take that risk, to be honest. Keep it away from others especially in public.
    Which is why our neighbors got rid of the Lab. They were afraid of it being around their small children, or possibly hurting another dog.

    Quote Originally Posted by BlueRidge View Post
    So just when do people think a dog should be considered worthy of getting a warning that might lead to it being put down?

    Last December I was walking my dog and there was an altercation and my dog was bitten on the nose by the other dog, a shiba inu. My dogs nose bled for sometime.

    Should I have reported this? Should the shiba inu's people treat it as a dangerous dog?

    My sister's old dog bit my old dog on three different occasions. Should it have been put down?
    First, if a dog is hurt (by another dog) badly enough that they need medical attention, it is not up to you whether or not to file a police report. If you don't do it, the vet will. The dog that attacked my dog, already had an attack on file in the town it was from. I got a call from animal control (in my town) asking for some information, and they told me about the 3 strikes (dog on dog) thing.

    Second, if the dogs are playing/fighting, that is one thing. If you are walking two dogs past each other on the street. And one 80 lb. dog viciously attacks a 15 lb. dog, trying to kill it, that is a whole other thing. A bite on the nose is not a kill attack. A full mouth grab of the throat, with severe shaking is a kill attack.

    I understand that no one wants to put a healthy dog down. But, if the dog maims or kills another dog(s), what about those dogs? Do they deserve to be harmed or killed? If the owner is not responsible enough to control an aggressive dog, there have to be consequences. Non-aggressive dogs deserve to be safe.

  13. #53
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    And that's the thing with the incidences I have had and with Cupid's incidence. No dog was hurt to the extent of needing medical attention.

    According to the CDC, millions of people in the US each year suffer dog bites and hundreds of thousands need medical attention. (CDC doesn't track dogs injured by other dogs.)

    How many dogs are going to be put down because their people put them in a situation they couldn't handle? I think everyone should learn from these situations and not just try to label particular dogs dangerous when they have not injured a person or animal.

    In this case, I see Cupid reacting immediately in the right way. She has learned before any dog was hurt that her dog can not socialize with other dogs. What more is there to say on this?
    Congratulations 2014 World Ice Dance Champions Anna Cappellini & Luca Lanotte!!!

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    Quote Originally Posted by BlueRidge View Post
    And that's the thing with the incidences I have had and with Cupid's incidence. No dog was hurt to the extent of needing medical attention.

    According to the CDC, millions of people in the US each year suffer dog bites and hundreds of thousands need medical attention. (CDC doesn't track dogs injured by other dogs.)

    How many dogs are going to be put down because their people put them in a situation they couldn't handle? I think everyone should learn from these situations and not just try to label particular dogs dangerous when they have not injured a person or animal.

    In this case, I see Cupid reacting immediately in the right way. She has learned before any dog was hurt that her dog can not socialize with other dogs. What more is there to say on this?
    I agree with you. I would only add that Cupid cannot be sure that the other dog was not hurt. When Cooper was attacked, we didn't immediately see any wounds. They didn't bleed right away. But, after he was able to get up, he was limping and we took him to the vet, to make sure he was okay. It was there that we found out how seriously he was hurt. In our case it was a neighbor, who said (when it happened) they would pay any bills for treatment. I felt awful for their girls, they were horrified . So, if there were complaints, Cupid might want to find out who made them. If they were from busy bodies, who were not involved, ignore them. but, if it was from the person who owned the attacked dog, she should contact them. No one will want to put her dog down after one dog attack.

    FTR, municipalities/animal control monitors dog on dog attacks. If a dog attacks another dog, they search any other towns where the dog lived for attack records. At least, that is how they do it in NJ.

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    Quote Originally Posted by BlueRidge View Post
    If a dog is aggressive with other dogs, that in no way predicts that it will be aggressive toward humans.

    I don't think that a dog that is aggressive at times with other dogs should be confused with a dog that is dangerous to humans.

    Dogs do get into fights. Some dogs who are generally good natured with other dogs sometimes get into fights with those other dogs. Its really not reasonable to suggest that a dog that has done that is a dangerous attack dog that might attack humans.
    Either way, a smart dog owner doesn't take the chance once they see their dog show any kind of aggression, because it's too late once something happens, if the owner has one incident with another dog, believes it to be an isolated case, and then it happens to be a human the next time.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Cupid View Post
    I called the dog park office today. So far, after two days, they have had 3 email messages about the incident. They want to file a police report. They have to 'track down who it is' which is strange since they have my dog's name and information. What more do they need? I didnt tell them I was the dog owner.
    So why the feck didn't you own the feck up and take responsibility for your dog's actions???!!

    Dumbass.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Karina1974 View Post
    So why the feck didn't you own the feck up and take responsibility for your dog's actions???!!

    Dumbass.
    That's totally uncalled for.
    3539 and counting.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Karina1974 View Post
    So why the feck didn't you own the feck up and take responsibility for your dog's actions???!!

    Dumbass.
    Own up to what? The person who answered the phone at the City Clerk's office who issued the dog pass said nobody was injured. I would gladly pay a vet bill if the dog required medical attention. So far, that doesn't seem to be the case.

    The City Clerk's office has everyone registered. All they have to do is look up the dog's name, it's not a common one. They have her breed and her name, my name and phone number and address. So they are waiting obviously to put together a report before I am contacted. Me contacting them and owning the "feck up" is not going to do any good.

    No, I'm going to wait for them to contact me and I'm going to ask to see these email complaints before I say anything to anyone about the matter. My biggest concern at this point is a police record on my dog. I'm planning my strategy now so that she doesn't have one. No injuries, no blood, just 25+ dogs running amok and an altercation. So every dog gets a police record for a fight at a dog park? I hope not!

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    Quote Originally Posted by milanessa View Post
    That's totally uncalled for.
    Well, I'm glad you think so.

    I personally have absolutely no sympathy or respect for anyone who has had the opportunity to own up to her part in an incident such as this and chooses not to take it. It's no different than being the guilty driver in a hit-and-run. And taking the dog to the best trainers she can find and avoiding all dog parks in the future will not nullify the damage that has already been done.

    I stand by my comment.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Cupid View Post
    My biggest concern at this point is a police record on my dog. I'm planning my strategy now so that she doesn't have one. No injuries, no blood, just 25+ dogs running amok and an altercation. So every dog gets a police record for a fight at a dog park? I hope not!
    Unfortunately, as I explained before, you can't be sure there was no blood. You and the other dog/owner, left right after it happened. We didn't know how bad my dog was until he was examined by the vet. Did you exchange names and phone numbers? If a dog attacks another dog, and a police report is filed, it stays with the dog. As I said before, be very careful not to put your dog in another situation where he/she can get into an altercation - 3 strikes. You are also at an unfair disadvantage because of the breed. Pit Bulls and Pit mixes are assumed to be aggressive/dangerous, even when they're not.

    Any breed can be aggressive (though I've never heard of an aggressive Cavalier ). when I've told people that my dog was attacked by a Lab, everyone is shocked - Labs are so gentle. But, animal control told me that the highest incidence of dog on human and dog on dog attacks are Labs. Probably because there are so many Labs as pets and because they are assumed gentle and the owners don't use caution.

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