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  1. #1
    Recovering from the Olys
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    Elite skaters and their part-time jobs (article)

    Includes quotes by John Coughlin, Jeremy Ten, Naomi (Nam) Poor, Themi Leftheris, Rockne Brubaker, and Drew Meekins: http://www.icenetwork.com/news/artic...&vkey=ice_news
    "Randy [Starkman (1960-April 16, 2012)] lived by the same motto as the rest of us. The Olympics isn’t every four years, it’s every single day. He just got it." --Canadian Olympic kayaker Adam van Koeverden

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    Quote Originally Posted by Sylvia View Post
    Includes quotes by John Coughlin, Jeremy Ten, Naomi (Nam) Poor, Themi Leftheris, Rockne Brubaker, and Drew Meekins: http://www.icenetwork.com/news/artic...&vkey=ice_news
    Just got done reading it. So inspiring to see the sacrifice and commitment that these athletes dedicate to their passion.

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    If you follow Jeremy Ten's tweets, it would be hard to tell that he's a skater: between his job and school, it's surprising he has enough time to sleep, and with skating, I'm not sure he does.
    "'Is this new BMW-designed sled the ultimate sledding machine for Langdon and Holcomb?' Leigh Diffey asked before the pair cruised to victory. I don’t know, but I know that sled is the ultimate Olympic Games product placement.." -- Jen Chaney

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    I've followed Jeremy's tweets and I dont know how he does it. Plus he's always to up-beat.
    Addicted to FSU

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    John Coughlin's job struck me as a cushy colorado training center job like the work study jobs students have. Give a guy a job with something easy to do and soon he's looking for help. LOL.

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    Quote Originally Posted by winterone View Post
    John Coughlin's job struck me as a cushy colorado training center job like the work study jobs students have.
    If you think that a work-study job is "cushy", you don't know much about work-study jobs.

    And if Coughlin's job is "cushy", so what? It helps him with his expenses and gives him experience that might be useful in whatever he does after skating.
    Who wants to watch rich people eat pizza? They must have loved that in Bangladesh. - Randy Newman on the 2014 Oscars broadcast

  7. #7

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    Very interesting article. Thanks for posting.

    The concern I have with reading this is the fatigue that some of these skaters have. Whilst they may not admit it, constant fatigue is a real safety issue. Particularly if are the guy in a pairs or dance team lifting the girl. It only takes one mistake and a serious accident could happen. On the other hand even just driving to the rink is a risk in itself.
    When you are up to your arse in alligators it is difficult to remember you were only meant to be draining the swamp.

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    I can definitely understand where fatigue would be a concern... but I think overall these athletes are probably physically/mentally okay working these hours because it continues the lifestyle they've always known as a student/athlete in their teens.

    Many (perhaps a majority) of elite athletes live the life style of a stereotypical American "over achiever"/"high achiever" student... so working 30 or more hours a week just replaces the time they may have spent on high school. Especially if they're able to work two full days on the weekends, that leaves only about 14-16 hours spread across Mon-Fri. Not bad at all.

    Now for those that are working 30+ hours a week, attending college part-time and skating... that's pushing it for most people to balance. Those attending college full-time, working those hours and skating? But, most athletes don't make it to this level by lacking a significant work ethic, drive, and dedication to all aspects of their life.

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    Seems a hard life, especially the part about Jeremy Ten. I just think that focus is actually quite important. I feel like colleges should offer some kind of over-achiever scholarship for them somehow.

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    Quote Originally Posted by kwanfan1818 View Post
    If you follow Jeremy Ten's tweets, it would be hard to tell that he's a skater: between his job and school, it's surprising he has enough time to sleep, and with skating, I'm not sure he does.
    If this matters, Jeremy Ten isn't a full-time student. He tweeted once that he was going to take eight years to finish his degree.

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    Several pair guys in Boston work part time - Tyler Harris is a shift manager at Starbucks; Simon Schnapir is also a barista there; and Andrew Speroff is employed at a work out facility. These guys work hard and are willing to do what it takes!

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    I have great admiration for skaters who continue their education while competing at an elite level, but I also respect the skaters who work long hours (often at muliptle jobs) to help support their skating. The focus and commitment these young people deserve some
    "The Devil is joining in, and that's never a good sign." Phil Liggett

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by overedge View Post
    If you think that a work-study job is "cushy", you don't know much about work-study jobs.
    Work-study jobs in the US tend to be pretty easy money for the amount of work involved. Don't know if that counts as cushy, but I would say it's pretty easy money.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Madre View Post
    Several pair guys in Boston work part time - Tyler Harris is a shift manager at Starbucks; Simon Schnapir is also a barista there; and Andrew Speroff is employed at a work out facility. These guys work hard and are willing to do what it takes!
    Andrew Speroff previously worked as a lifeguard at the Olympic Training Center in Colorado Springs (yes, even Michael Phelps has a lifeguard on duty). That job included mandatory workout time at the OTC (haha!). Other non-skating-related jobs that pair skaters have held include fast food chef, arena security guard at major sporting events and concerts, community college computer lab staff, Best Buy geek squad, theater production assistant, disc jockey, Home Depot employee, fitness instructor, waitress and bartender. Jobs related to skating include skate instruction, skate rental, zamboni driver, skate sharpener, music production, costume making, pair/dance testing partner, paid ice show appearances, etc. Skaters are pretty creative about earning money and they often do a lot of part-time paid activities.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by agalisgv View Post
    Work-study jobs in the US tend to be pretty easy money for the amount of work involved. Don't know if that counts as cushy, but I would say it's pretty easy money.
    Did I say I was talking about work-study jobs not in the US?
    Who wants to watch rich people eat pizza? They must have loved that in Bangladesh. - Randy Newman on the 2014 Oscars broadcast

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    My work-study jobs were no more cushy than other office and food service work I've done and the expectations were higher. The only thing that was cushy were the flexible hours, especially around finals time.

    I had great bosses, though, who trained me for real life jobs. I never knew they were supposed to be cushy.
    Last edited by kwanfan1818; 06-02-2012 at 06:54 AM.
    "'Is this new BMW-designed sled the ultimate sledding machine for Langdon and Holcomb?' Leigh Diffey asked before the pair cruised to victory. I don’t know, but I know that sled is the ultimate Olympic Games product placement.." -- Jen Chaney

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    Work-study tends to be non-manual labor, and not intellectually demanding work. Also, it's generally paid twice the normal salary so a student can earn a lot more working far fewer hours. I don't know what people consider cushy, so I wouldn't use that term. But for the amount and type of work put in, the money is far in excess of normal pay scales for that work.

  18. #18
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    I never made more than minimum wage. The university paid a fraction -- I think 25% -- and the Federal government paid the rest. There was a limit to the number of hours, but I'm not sure if that was a Federal or university limit, since it was part of many financial aid packages.

    I understand that Coughlin's job isn't as physically demanding as restaurant work, and the hours aren't as crazy, but most office or restaurant work isn't intellectually demanding, and I don't think there's any evidence that Coughlin is sitting eating bon bons and being paid the play video games (not your implication.) I wish there were as many office jobs with reasonable hours like that as elite athletes want.
    "'Is this new BMW-designed sled the ultimate sledding machine for Langdon and Holcomb?' Leigh Diffey asked before the pair cruised to victory. I don’t know, but I know that sled is the ultimate Olympic Games product placement.." -- Jen Chaney

  19. #19
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    Wow, I've never heard of work-study jobs paying minimum wage. Depends on the area, of course. But they generally paid 50-100% more than comparable non-work-study jobs.

    Interesting.
    Quote Originally Posted by overedge View Post
    Did I say I was talking about work-study jobs not in the US?
    Considering you work in academia in Canada, I don't know why you would tell someone they don't know much about work-study jobs in the US compared to you.

    Anyhow, none of this really applies to Coughlin since his isn't a work-study position, and who knows what he's being paid.

  20. #20

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    I never made more than minimum wage doing work study and you were only allowed to work a certain number of hours. I would have loved to work more hours and made more money.

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