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  1. #81
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    It's easy to like tragic movies with cathartic endings. "Okay, everyone's dead but they died for something, so it's uplifting in the end". But there are also tragic movies without such an escape latch. The top three in my opinion are "Come and See", "Army of Shadows" and "Irreversible". Well, in "Army of Shadows" people die for something but there isn't anything remotely heroic in their self-sacrifice.

  2. #82
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rex View Post
    Boyz In the Hood - totally captured the essence of South Central LA, all the chaos, despair, violence and hope. I thought it was tragic because of how many lives were lost and when the carnage was basically over, only Trey and his gf "survived". The rest of them either died or didn't change their lives for the better.
    I had forgotten about this movie, and agree that it was incredibly tragic. All the more so because even though it was fiction, it so closely paralleled the reality of South Central L.A. at the time.
    "I miss footwork that has any kind of a discernible pattern. The goal of a step sequence should not be for a skater to show the same ice coverage as a Zamboni and take about as much time as an ice resurface. " ~ Zemgirl, reflecting on a pre-IJS straight line sequence

  3. #83
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    Quote Originally Posted by equatorial View Post
    It's easy to like tragic movies with cathartic endings. "Okay, everyone's dead but they died for something, so it's uplifting in the end". But there are also tragic movies without such an escape latch. The top three in my opinion are "Come and See", "Army of Shadows" and "Irreversible". Well, in "Army of Shadows" people die for something but there isn't anything remotely heroic in their self-sacrifice.
    Good point. I was thinking about a horror film that upset me as it wasn't just your run-of-the-mill slice and dice fare. It was called 30 Days of Night and I don't think the ending could be called cathartic or happy. I really cared for the people who were in constant hiding from vampires who were nothing like the current tv crop of vampires except for blood lust. As dark as it is the film has become one my favorites in the genre and I think it fits this thread's category as well.

  4. #84
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cyn View Post
    Regarding the plot and character development related to the "love story" (along with the character assassination, in many cases, of several of the ship's officers/crew and passengers who were on the Titanic in real life), Cameron's Titanic is pure suckage.

    I've said this before in previous threads about it, but when it comes to the technical aspects of moviemaking, Titanic is an absolute masterpiece. The special effects, editing, and sound did a good job to show what went on down in the bowels of the ship (specifically the boiler rooms and the crew working on the electrical/generators) as well as the horror and terror experienced by those who didn't make it into the lifeboats.
    Oh, TECHNICALLY, it's a stunning movie. (Despite minor goofs like Pacific white-sided dolphins in the north Atlantic and the ship being a tad too short.) As far as the plot, while I increasingly appreciate Leo DiCaprio (he does a very nice bit when Rose is on the raft and you can see him realizing "If I want her to live, I'm dead") the overt slandering of the officers, crew and Ismay, the Flanderization of characters like "Molly" Brown, the fact that the only two other secondary fictional characters besides Rose's mother and Cal are basically talking ethnic stereotypes, the total absence of the entire second class....the real tragedy was the script. But the treatment of William Murdoch alone would have earned them a pillorying even if the rest weren't a mess. FTR, I'm in the relatively small camp who thinks if there WAS a suicide, the most likely candidate was Sixth Officer Moody, and I don't think there was enough evidence for anyone to include it overtly. As it was, it says a lot Fox sent a VP to Murdoch's hometown to apologize in person to his nephew and the village.

    I don't know if "Gettysburg" is a tragedy or not. The so-called 'right' side won, more or less, but it's not like anyone came out of it mentally or physically unscathed, and you know they've got two more years of this and it's not getting any less bloody....

  5. #85

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    Quote Originally Posted by Grannyfan View Post
    In response to an earlier post about the availability of Holocaust on Netflix--it is available. I watched it a couple of years ago.

    Seems that I remember another Holocaust mini-series on American TV years ago, but I may be mistaken. There was a scene of a bunch of people either hiding or locked into a barn-like building, and a woman was giving birth at the exact moment that the Nazis burst in. That scene made such an impact on me. I don't think it was from The Holocaust. Does anyone else remember anything like this?
    The lead-in scene to every episode of Holocaust is a bunch of Jews of all ages being forced into a temple which was wooden & very barn-like & then the Nazis barring the door & setting it on fire. I don't think I have forgotten many details from that movie.

    It was the 1st time I had seen Meryl Streep & James Wood & I was very impressed with both. But the whole cast was wonderful.

    Quote Originally Posted by aliceanne View Post
    The darkest movie I have ever seen is Capote. It was about how Truman Capote wrote his novel "In Cold Blood", which was based on a news story about a farm family who was murdered in the middle of the night in 1950's Ohio. Capote started following the story and when they captured the suspects he begain interviewing them.

    Capote started at a superior cynical New York writer, but as the trial progressed and the killers were condemned to death, the one killer started to get into his head. He began to realize the killer and he shared the same abusive childhood filled with rejection, and while he felt repulsed by the killer, he begins to feel a reluctant empathy. Capote couldn't escape the feeling that for a few twists of fate, it could have been him. His most telling quote was 'it was as if we had grown up in the same house, only I went out the front door and he went out the back'. In the end, the killer invites him to his hanging, and though Capote was horrified at the thought, he felt compelled to go because the killer had no one else.

    Capote never wrote another novel after "In Cold Blood".
    The book & the movie was equally chilling. Robert Blake played that character...he was so obsessed by the fact that people lose control of their functions when being hung that he would not eat or drink for several days beforehand. The last scene of the movie is shot below the gallows. When the he falls thru the trapdoor the camera focuses on his pants & you see a stain spreading in the crotch. :shudder:

  6. #86
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    Quote Originally Posted by DAngel View Post
    Is that play very well-known where you are?
    Of course.

    Quote Originally Posted by cruisin View Post

    Spoiler

    Spoiler


  7. #87

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    Quote Originally Posted by BittyBug View Post
    I had forgotten about this movie, and agree that it was incredibly tragic. All the more so because even though it was fiction, it so closely paralleled the reality of South Central L.A. at the time.
    It totally resonated with me since so many people I grew up with are dead or in jail or on hardcore drugs. So many young people lost to violence, AIDS as well. But BITH captured the desolateness of that neighborhood. I've been to that area a couple of times - I had shipmates who were from that area and spent a Memorial Day and a Thanksgiving in South Central, and John Singleton did an excellent job of capturing the mood and atmosphere.

  8. #88

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    The Diving Bell and the Butterfly -- the was compounded by the fact that it's a true story, based on an almost unimaginable sort of existence -- and yet the author managed to create this amazing, heart-breaking memoir. When I read the book, I was alternately moved to awe, to horror, and to tears.

  9. #89

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    Quote Originally Posted by DarrellH View Post
    Love Story (fitting for a figure skating board)
    For me, the end was too unrealistic to be tragic. Jenny is lying in a hospital bed, dying of leukemia. She still has a full head of hair, and not a single tube going in or out of her.
    Nubka - Unpaid Slave Laborer...

  10. #90
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    Quote Originally Posted by Vagabond View Post

    Spoiler

    Why would this sound rather silly?

    Quote Originally Posted by Vagabond View Post

    Spoiler

    I don't think Del Toro have misunderstood his own work. Anyway, I'm not saying that it was a happy ending. It was more of a bitter-sweet ending, but not outright tragic...

    Quote Originally Posted by Vagabond View Post

    Spoiler

    Or we see the clues that the director/writer have put in the film and interpret them as he intended. Are you saying only your interpretation is correct?

  11. #91

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jimena View Post
    Oh dear, I'd forgotten about The Constant Gardener. Wonderful film. Terribly sad.
    ITA. I totally forgot about that one.

    Quote Originally Posted by Rex View Post
    Boyz In the Hood - totally captured the essence of South Central LA, all the chaos, despair, violence and hope. I thought it was tragic because of how many lives were lost and when the carnage was basically over, only Trey and his gf "survived". The rest of them either died or didn't change their lives for the better.
    How could I forget this one?! Boyz In the Hood is definitely one of the most tragic movies I've ever seen.

    Another profoundly tragic movie to add to the list (I'm not sure if someone mentioned it already) is Paradise Lost. The ending in so sad and mad even sad by the fact that it isn't so far off from reality for some Palestinians.
    "If people are looking for guarantees, they should buy appliances at Sears and stay away from human relationships."~Prancer

  12. #92
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    At Close Range - What makes this movie even more tragic is the fact that it is based on a true story.

  13. #93
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    Welcome To The Dollhouse
    Great movie.

    Audition
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    Gran Torino
    Last edited by leesaleesa; 02-28-2012 at 02:08 AM. Reason: Italics tag

  14. #94
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    I loved Atonement, (plus it had some hot scenes!)

    cheesy, but still I love A Walk to Remember.

  15. #95

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    Quote Originally Posted by Vash01 View Post
    What were the most tragic movies you actually liked?

    I am a sucker for happy endings in movies.
    I am a sucker for a realistic ending... Happy fake predictable endings is what makes a movie tragic.

    More than half of the movies which I like usually are tragedies, and to name a few:

    Sunset Boulevard
    Shoeshine
    Mrs. Minerva
    A Place in the Sun (An American Tragedy)
    Yearling
    Andrey Rublev
    Mayerling
    La Strada
    The Stationmaster’s Wife
    Ship of Fools
    The Cow
    One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Next
    Man Who Fell to Earth
    Marriage of Maria Braun
    Veronica Voss
    Sophie’s Choice
    Deer Hunter
    Chinatown
    Nello and Patrash (The Dog of Flanders)
    The Elephan Man
    Kiss of the Spiderwoman
    Jude
    Ethan Frome
    Little Vera
    Light the Red Lantern
    The Inner Circle
    Ran
    1984
    Soylent Green
    The Garden of the Finzi Continis
    Hillary and Jackie
    House of Sand and Fog
    Basel
    Of Mice and Men
    The Professional
    Burnt By The Sun
    The English Patient
    Modigliani
    Camille Claudelle
    Mambo Kings
    Enemies: A Love Story
    Edmond
    Elena (Zvyagintsev)
    The Return (Zvyagintsev)

  16. #96
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    Quote Originally Posted by leesaleesa View Post
    Great movie.

    Gran Torino
    Oooh, I'm torn on that being a tragedy... Tragedy would imply no redemption for Walt the cranky racist jerk and that his actions don't improve anything. Walt not only

    Spoiler

    The fact a major character ends the movie in a box doesn't automatically mean it's a tragedy.

    I mean, yeah, the area it's SET in is a tragedy, but that's just reality. Detroit and certain burbs (it's set in Highland Park) have been going to crap for nigh on fifty years but that's just how it is there.

    Likewise I don't think I would call "Schindler's List" a tragedy. Yes, it's set in the Holocaust. Yes, obviously, as such, people die. HOWEVER, the main character is, again, redeemed, and saves 1200 people. The entire color end sequence in Jerusalem at the real Schindler's grave is sort of the opposite of tragedy--it's flinging the survival of these people and their descendants into the face of the attempt to destroy them. Just because something is SET in tragic circumstances doesn't mean the plot is a tragedy. I think one could make a stronger argument that "Saving Private Ryan" is a tragedy...

    Now, "Throne of Blood" is a tragedy. But that's because it's Macbeth in feudal Japan. (Unfortunately it's also really expensive on DVD...all Kurosawa's stuff is.) One could also make a strong argument that "The Seven Samurai" is a tragedy (and ergo so is "The Magnificent Seven" as that's almost a shot-for-shot remake), at least for the titular characters.

  17. #97
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    Tess of the d'Urbervilles. First when Angel Clare rejects her for doing the same damn thing he did. Then, the ending.
    "The team doesn't get automatic capacity because management is mad" -- Greg Smith, agile guy

  18. #98
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    Quote Originally Posted by DarrellH View Post
    At least he didn't write "Love Story: Breaking Dawn". (Even though I believe there was an Oliver's Story)
    Yes, there was a sequel novel, "Oliver's Story". It wasn't bad and gave you some insight into Oliver's relationship with his father.

    Quote Originally Posted by Cachoo View Post
    Good point. I was thinking about a horror film that upset me as it wasn't just your run-of-the-mill slice and dice fare. It was called 30 Days of Night and I don't think the ending could be called cathartic or happy. I really cared for the people who were in constant hiding from vampires who were nothing like the current tv crop of vampires except for blood lust. As dark as it is the film has become one my favorites in the genre and I think it fits this thread's category as well.
    That was the scariest vampire film I've seen. They were just so malevolent and utterly ruthless. Speaking of vampires, one of the saddest and most unsettling films I've seen was "Let Me In". It's a Swedish film about a lonely young boy and his friendship with a child vampire. The Skeleton Key is another horror film with a sad ending.
    Last edited by Civic; 02-28-2012 at 03:44 AM.

  19. #99

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    Quote Originally Posted by skipaway View Post
    Galipoli
    That's a great movie- i think one of the best anti- war movies I've seen ( and growing up in Soviet Union with a shodow of WW2 always there, I've seen many war movies).
    "Deerhunter" is in the same category.

    And I have to mention Kieslowski's "Bleu" ("Blue"- part of his " Blue", 'White" "Red" trilogy). I cried throughout the whole darn movie, and yet still think of it as a transendent uplifting piece of art. Utterly tragic, and utterly beautiful.
    Last edited by dinakt; 02-28-2012 at 04:02 AM.
    improving my ballad- like lines

  20. #100
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    I love Titanic and A night to remember. I think Night as more a truth movie and Titanic as more a perception/pov movie even if it's not 100% the case either way. Night feels like it's telling a true story while Titanic is Rose's memory. Either way I don't consider Titanic tragic because the center story, Jack changed Rose's life for the better.

    As for Pan, An after life doesn't take away the tragic. I was devastated watching that movie. Traumatized!!

    I watched 6 weeks a couple days ago and It's a pretty good movie although I always cry when watching it. It does have some corniness to it though. I think any movie kids die is tragic. I never cried in Love story. The book nor the movie. I cried over the tv movie Alex: The Life of a Child.

    I couldn't watch the movie Boy in striped pajama's. The Book destroyed me. Nor my sister's keeper.

    Yesterday I was watching From here to eternity. Prewitt's story is a tragedy. I always have to watch red river or The search afterwards.

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