Results 1 to 12 of 12
  1. #1
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    2,527
    vCash
    500
    Rep Power
    0

    Who was the first Skater in history ever to use Off-Ice-Training?

    Say,I was wondering about that. Does anyone who actully WAS the FIRST Skater EVER to use Off-Ice-Training....and how Off-Ice-Training started?

  2. #2
    Watch me move
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Gwyneth Paltrow Fan Club headquarters
    Posts
    16,753
    vCash
    500
    Rep Power
    0
    I think it depends on what you call "off-ice training". A lot of skaters in the early 1900s took ballet or did some kind of dancing like ballroom, because it helped their skating (with good body positions, musicality, etc.)
    Who wants to watch rich people eat pizza? They must have loved that in Bangladesh. - Randy Newman on the 2014 Oscars broadcast

  3. #3
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    2,527
    vCash
    500
    Rep Power
    0
    Just Off-Ice-Training in genual. Was there a number 1 Skater by name who did Off-Ice-Training first?

  4. #4
    Watch me move
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Gwyneth Paltrow Fan Club headquarters
    Posts
    16,753
    vCash
    500
    Rep Power
    0
    I don't think there would be any record of that. I would guess that pretty much every high-level skater in history has done some kind of additional training off the ice.
    Who wants to watch rich people eat pizza? They must have loved that in Bangladesh. - Randy Newman on the 2014 Oscars broadcast

  5. #5
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Posts
    888
    vCash
    500
    Rep Power
    0
    It must have occurred to the first jumpers and lifters, "Wouldn't it make sense to learn this off-ice first?"

  6. #6
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    97
    vCash
    500
    Rep Power
    0
    FSWers "questions" always hurt my brain, and not in a good way ...

  7. #7

    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Age
    52
    Posts
    10,243
    vCash
    500
    Rep Power
    10899
    Quote Originally Posted by Johnny_Fever View Post
    It must have occurred to the first jumpers and lifters, "Wouldn't it make sense to learn this off-ice first?"
    Lifters, probably yes.

    Not sure what you mean by the first jumpers. The first jumps on ice were probably jumping over natural obstacles like logs frozen into streams.

    Later jumping over a hat or larger object show off. By the early 20th century there was a sport of barrel jumping, started by speedskaters. They couldn't have practiced that off ice without the speed.

    I think some figure skaters were doing the equivalent of waltz jumps in the early 19th century. Again, no need for off ice practice.

    Axel Paulsen, a speedskater first and figure skater second, figured out by the 1880s how to jump off a forward outside edge, turn around more than once in the air, and land backward. Perhaps he was the "first jumper" in the modern sense. But I doubt he practiced jumping and rotating off the ice first. It was the edges that created the rotation, the idea of jumping and rotating in the air.

    After that the single jumps from other edges were invented in the early 20th century. Again, the whole point was to jump from one edge to another edge.

    Maybe when some skaters started trying to rotate 2 times in the air around the 1920s they tried it off ice first. But even then I doubt it. Again, the speed and the curve of the edges made the rotation easier and would have inspired the attempts by advanced skaters who felt comfortable on the blades and could make good use of the speed and edges to generate rotation.

    As double jumps became common and not restricted to a few top athletes, around the 1940s, that's probably when skaters started jumping and rotating off ice would have started being a useful training exercise.

  8. #8
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Posts
    888
    vCash
    500
    Rep Power
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by gkelly View Post
    . . . . .Maybe when some skaters started trying to rotate 2 times in the air around the 1920s they tried it off ice first. . . . .
    I guess that's what I meant. I remember doing some off-ice doubles prior to some sessions. When I got on the ice shortly thereafter, it was as if I was already warmed up. I didn't do off-ice training enough to make a difference, but my work ethic left a lot to be desired on those days.

    I wouldn't suggest significant numbers of off-ice jumps. On the ice, much of the landing force gets transitioned into horizontal motion. That's not the case off-ice. As the gymnasts say, you 'stick your landing.'

  9. #9
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    2,527
    vCash
    500
    Rep Power
    0

    Red face

    Quote Originally Posted by Johnny_Fever View Post
    I guess that's what I meant. I remember doing some off-ice doubles prior to some sessions. When I got on the ice shortly thereafter, it was as if I was already warmed up. I didn't do off-ice training enough to make a difference, but my work ethic left a lot to be desired on those days.

    I wouldn't suggest significant numbers of off-ice jumps. On the ice, much of the landing force gets transitioned into horizontal motion. That's not the case off-ice. As the gymnasts say, you 'stick your landing.'
    Off-Ice-Doubles? Explain? BTW. for "Off-Ice-Trainning"...does anyone know when that term first became offical? As far as that type of Training goes?

  10. #10
    Recovering from the Olys
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Posts
    28,317
    vCash
    500
    Rep Power
    16941
    Quote Originally Posted by FSWer View Post
    Off-Ice-Doubles? Explain?
    Many skaters practice their jumps off-ice in sneakers. "Off-ice doubles" refers to practicing double jumps on the floor.

  11. #11
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Posts
    888
    vCash
    500
    Rep Power
    0
    What Sylvia said. Practicing doubles off-ice.

    Our coaches used to encourage us to participate in ballet classes in the '70s. I don't remember if we had a name for those kinds of activities, but if it was up to me, I'd call it: Off-Ice Training.

  12. #12

    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Posts
    2,897
    vCash
    400
    Rep Power
    5459
    Quote Originally Posted by Johnny_Fever View Post
    I wouldn't suggest significant numbers of off-ice jumps. On the ice, much of the landing force gets transitioned into horizontal motion. That's not the case off-ice. As the gymnasts say, you 'stick your landing.'
    I've only ever done a handful of off ice formal training classes but everyone that went through dry land jumping and rotation made the point that you absolutely should not "stick the landing" of a dry land jump, you should execute several hops continuing to rotate around until you come to a controlled stop otherwise you can really pull your knee.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •