Page 3 of 5 FirstFirst 12345 LastLast
Results 41 to 60 of 81
  1. #41
    Registered User
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Posts
    855
    vCash
    500
    Rep Power
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by znachki View Post
    No, the "Wire in the Blood" series is based on the Tony Hill/Carol Jordan series.
    Yes, I have my series mixed up. Thanks for clarifying.

  2. #42

    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    Celebrating Jeremy Abbott's FS at 2014 Worlds...
    Posts
    21,093
    vCash
    500
    Rep Power
    12584
    Quote Originally Posted by znachki View Post
    Cyn - you picked exactly the wrong one to read! I used to read her books - until I read "The Last Precinct" (if that's the one with the weird cat digression?). Hated it. Coincidently, it was about this time that I discovered Kathy Reichs (Temperence Brennan), and never looked back!
    I'm guessing this is the series that's the basis for the show Bones?

    Hopefully the books are better than Bones. Back when it premiered, I had high hopes that it would be a good, compelling crime drama. I tried watching it, but I found it lacking, mainly for two reasons:

    1. Instead of being a relatively realistic crime drama, which it had the potential to be, it seemed like the main focus of the producers (and in turn, the writers) were more interested attracting the hipster-douchebag demographic. The dialogue in the scripts, in an attempt to create banter between the characters, reeks of trying too hard to be oh-so-sassy and "with-it," and instead, they come across as annoying, hipster-douchebag wannabes. Harsh criticism, I know, but that's how it seemed to me .

    2. The characters on the show are irritatingly obnoxious, especially the annoying, sex-on-the-brain chick that operates the "amazing hologram person/image generator thingee" and the über-cynical-konspiracy entomologist dude (for my cynical konspiracy cop dude fix, I prefer Munch from Law & Order: SVU ).

    Those two things were enough for me to give up on it . I've occasionally caught parts of it on TNT when I've forgotten to change the channel after watching Law & Order, and from what I've seen, it doesn't appear to have changed formula.

    Sorry, Bones fans.
    "Meryl is from a magic planet where Disney princesses come from, and [Charlie's] hair is a magic carpet." ~~ Stephen Colbert, on The Colbert Report

  3. #43

    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Deep in a Dream
    Posts
    7,457
    vCash
    500
    Rep Power
    7281
    I like the noir genre. Raymond Chandler is my favorite.
    My job requires me to be a juggler, but that does not mean that I enjoy working with clowns.

  4. #44

    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Posts
    1,172
    vCash
    500
    Rep Power
    0
    I like the classics. Sir Arthur Conan Doyle and Agatha Christie are great, although Christie can get a bit same-y after a while. However, she does some of the best twists. The ending of The Murder of Roger Ackroyd completely shocked me and And Then There Were None was fabulously suspenseful and had another ending I never expected.

    Mystery lovers should at least give Conan Doyle a go, The Hound of Baskervilles sets the standard IMO. There are some great short stories if you don't want to dive right in to a longer one.

    ETA: The Cat Who... series are good for light mystery reading. I call them good airport books because they're quick reads, entertaining, and not too heavy. Still a good hint of whodunnit in there though.

  5. #45
    Satisfied skating fan
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Partying with the Skate Gods
    Posts
    39,958
    vCash
    600
    Rep Power
    17004
    Quote Originally Posted by Cyn View Post
    I'm guessing this is the series that's the basis for the show Bones?

    .
    In name of the lead character only. I'm a long time fan of Reich's, albeit, she's a bit full of herself now, but don't bother with the show. Her books are based on forensic anthropology as Reich is a forensic anthropologist at USC Charleston. The cases are based loosely on some of hers over the years. She does best when she focuses on what she knows best.

    If people like Reich's books, they might like the series written by Jefferson Bass. Similar theme and authorship. The Bass part of the writing team is George Bass who is professor emeritus in forensic anthropology at U of Tennessee. He started the Body Farm at UT. There are four or five books in the series.

    I'm not a real fan of the so-called classics in mystery writing. They are heavy on plot and very light on characterization. And Christie was notorious for introducing the villain at the very end and the reader had no opportunity to figure out what was happening. OTOH, some of the more recent focus in mysteries is on character development and the plot is so thin you know exactly whodunit in about a chapter. It is the rare author who can do both well.
    Adelina Sotnikova defeated the curse of Esta She is indeed the Greatest Of All Time!

  6. #46

    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Two places! Atlanta suburbs and in the North Georgia Mountains
    Posts
    3,795
    vCash
    500
    Rep Power
    1994
    Cyn, Kathy Reichs' books are so much better than the show! Although I don't hate the program as much as you do, we just don't watch it anymore. But, the books are really good, especially the first ones. Temperance splits her time between Charlotte, NC and Montreal, and there are books for each city but they all sort of fit. She flies back and forth. But the forensic imput is really fascinating, and you know this woman knows her stuff. Don't let the TV show throw you off the books if you ever feel like trying them. Go back to the first one and see what you think.

  7. #47

    Join Date
    Apr 2001
    Location
    Where the wind blows
    Posts
    9,670
    vCash
    500
    Rep Power
    3603
    I like many of the ones already listed. Did anyone mention M.C. Beaton - Hamish McBeth series and Gail Bowen - Joanne Kilburn series?

  8. #48
    Mad for mangelwurzels
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Failing to grow a forest in the desert
    Posts
    10,323
    vCash
    500
    Rep Power
    59062
    Wilkie Collins' The Moonstone and The Woman in White. Talk about page turners!
    Be with me always—take any form—drive me mad! only do not leave me in this abyss, where I cannot find you! Oh, God! it is unutterable! I cannot live without my life! I cannot live without my soul!"

  9. #49

    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Deep in a Dream
    Posts
    7,457
    vCash
    500
    Rep Power
    7281
    Quote Originally Posted by orientalplane View Post
    Wilkie Collins' The Moonstone and The Woman in White. Talk about page turners!
    Collins is one of my favorite 19th century authors.
    My job requires me to be a juggler, but that does not mean that I enjoy working with clowns.

  10. #50

    Join Date
    May 2010
    Posts
    285
    vCash
    500
    Rep Power
    77
    I was glad to see a few posters in this thread mentioning some "Golden Age" authors and their works. To them I highly recommend books by Dorothy Cameron Disney, an author from this time period who has been unfairly ignored, even by scholars of the genre. Her first book, "Death in the Back Seat", is now in print again, though, and is available on Amazon.

  11. #51
    Bountifully Enmeshed
    Join Date
    Apr 2001
    Location
    At the Christmas Bizarre
    Posts
    37,687
    vCash
    250
    Rep Power
    15218
    Quote Originally Posted by rfisher View Post
    And Christie was notorious for introducing the villain at the very end and the reader had no opportunity to figure out what was happening.
    I haven't read Christie in a while, but I don't remember that being the case at all. I always knew whodunnit in her books because it was always the one person in the cast of characters who couldn't possibly have done it. The trick was figuring out how the villain did it anyway.

    I hate mysteries in which the villain in introduced at the very end, but I have never considered Christie books one of them.
    Trolling dates all the way back to 397 B.C. - People began following Plato around and would make fart noises after everything he said.

  12. #52
    Satisfied skating fan
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Partying with the Skate Gods
    Posts
    39,958
    vCash
    600
    Rep Power
    17004
    Quote Originally Posted by Prancer View Post
    I haven't read Christie in a while, but I don't remember that being the case at all. I always knew whodunnit in her books because it was always the one person in the cast of characters who couldn't possibly have done it. The trick was figuring out how the villain did it anyway.

    I hate mysteries in which the villain in introduced at the very end, but I have never considered Christie books one of them.
    I should have said she introduced information at the very end about the villian that the reader didn't have. She didn't actually introduce new characters to the story. I like being able to figure out the puzzle along with the protagonist and don't like it when they suddenly point the accusing finger at the butler and tell me all this stuff I didn't know. That's not fair plotting. But, at least she did have a definable plot and with the modern focus on character development, good plotting is lost. I just finished listening to a series of short stories by Catherine Aird and she did such a good job of combining both key information about the characters, key clues about the plot/mystery and a satisfactory conclusion. I think that is really challenging to do both in a short story and she did an excellent job. Sadly, not many do. Even my beloved Lee Child's latest Reacher novels have been with the gaping plot holes in the story, although the most recent was a little better.

    And one of my favorite series is Preston and Child's Agent Pendergast series. Lurve me some Pendergast. I actually like John Sanford's Virgil Flowers spin off better than his Lucas Davenport novels. Mostly, because I like Virgil better than Davenport.
    Adelina Sotnikova defeated the curse of Esta She is indeed the Greatest Of All Time!

  13. #53
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Posts
    439
    vCash
    500
    Rep Power
    0
    Some wonderful writers mentioned! Thanks for this thread! I consume several mysteries per week so obviously am on the lookout for new ones. Have read some wonderful Scandinavian noir recently. Indradson, Lackberg are two that come to mind.

    Quentin Jardine
    Stuart MacBride
    Denise Mina (Scot noir!)
    Robert Crais
    James Lee Burke
    Alafair Burke (his daughter)
    Jesse Kellerman (better than his parents)
    and, my all time fave,
    Reg Hill! He is a superb writer and you won't find a better character than Andy Dalziel! Treat yourself and read this series from the beginning!

  14. #54
    Loving on babies!
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Twin heaven!
    Posts
    11,652
    vCash
    1570
    Rep Power
    15573
    My faves were always the Sherlock Holmes series, and any of Agatha Christie's. But I will say that the most re-readable for me based on how he wrote is Rex Stout's Nero Wolfe novels.
    I am free of all prejudices. I hate everyone equally.~W. C. Fields

  15. #55
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Jul 2001
    Location
    Montana
    Posts
    4,316
    vCash
    500
    Rep Power
    0
    Some more of my favorites: Margaret Maron, Anne Perry,Shirley Rousseau Murphy, Douglas Preston, Preston & Child, Carolyn Haines, Lyn Hamilton, Karen Kijewski, Jack Higgins, Frederick Forsyth. I like all types of mysteries.

  16. #56
    Satisfied skating fan
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Partying with the Skate Gods
    Posts
    39,958
    vCash
    600
    Rep Power
    17004
    Quote Originally Posted by merrywidow View Post
    Some more of my favorites: Margaret Maron, Anne Perry,Shirley Rousseau Murphy, Douglas Preston, Preston & Child, Carolyn Haines, Lyn Hamilton, Karen Kijewski, Jack Higgins, Frederick Forsyth. I like all types of mysteries.
    Carolyn will have a new book out this summer. I'm hoping she drops Graf and puts Sarah Booth back with Harold. I know she felt constrained with having all the murders take place close to home, but those really are her best work. I'm so glad her sales have been good enough that she's kept her contract. So many have lost theirs.
    Adelina Sotnikova defeated the curse of Esta She is indeed the Greatest Of All Time!

  17. #57

    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Posts
    9,490
    vCash
    500
    Rep Power
    1231
    When growing up I’ve read all of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle’s “Sherlock Holmes” novels, and all of Agatha Christie’s “Poirot” and “Miss Marple” novels.

    I specifically enjoy just the “gentleman detectives” genre (or “lady detective”). I prefer high-society settings, conduct and characters, and “stories of elegant crimes” i.e. jewelry and art heists, like the story line of “Thomas Crown Affair - 2”.

    The crime itself does not have to be exciting or complicated, but the interactions, the language, the form, and relations between characters are important to me. It makes it even more so pleasant if the scenario takes place in any luxury setting, a villa, a cruise down the Nile, on the canals of Venice, etc.

    In addition to Conan Doyle and Agatha Christie, I enjoy the following

    Wilkie Collins – “Moonstone/Lady in White”

    Lord Peter Wimsey – “Dorothy L. Sayers”

    Edgar Allan Poe – “C. Augustus Dupin”

    Robert Van Gulik – “Judge Dee”

    Nikolas Blake (aka C. Day-Lewis) – “Nigel Strangeways/Issue of Proof”

    Colin Dexter – “Inspector Morse”

    Manuel Vazquez Montalban - “Detective Pepe Carvalho”

    Donna Leon – “Commissario Brunetti”.
    Last edited by Tinami Amori; 02-25-2012 at 08:48 PM.

  18. #58
    Port de bras!!!
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Location
    Ravenclaw
    Posts
    29,499
    vCash
    500
    Rep Power
    19808
    As a kid, I loved Georges Simenon's Commissaire Maigret series. Still love to catch an episode on TV.
    "Nature is a damp, inconvenient sort of place where birds and animals wander about uncooked."

    from Speedy Death

  19. #59
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Southern CA
    Age
    57
    Posts
    1,498
    vCash
    500
    Rep Power
    0
    An unusual one that BrokenAnkle and I both like (that's rare!) is the Ian Rutledge novels by Charles Todd (which is really co-written by Charles and his mother Caroline). is a Scotland Yard inspector who came back damaged from WWI and is piecing his life together by solving crimes for the Yard. The Rutledge charactor is haunted by the memory of something from the War, a charactor named Hamish who resides in his psyche and provides an interesting counterpoint to the main charactor. Good stuff

    Here's more info.... http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Caroline_and_Charles_Todd

  20. #60
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Springfield, next door to Homer
    Age
    43
    Posts
    840
    vCash
    500
    Rep Power
    0
    Oh, I love reading detective novels. Though I haven't read in awhile my favorites are:
    Kathy Reichs - the books are way better than the show. Though I do like the show I just wish they would have made the Dr. Brennan character on the show like she really is in the books. She's nothing like the character on the show.
    Rita Mae Brown and Sneaky Pie Brown (that's a cat). - Rita Mae writes mysteries where the animals help solve the case and she includes her cat (Sneaky Pie) that she got from the shelter as co-author. There are easy to read and not too graphic.
    Robert Crais - have not read his books in awhile but I liked his Elvis Cole novels.
    Janet Evanovich - like her books but I feel she is starting to repeat the same humor over and over again.
    Robert Parker - I did like his book with the female detective named Sunny.

Page 3 of 5 FirstFirst 12345 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •