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  1. #61
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    Quote Originally Posted by DAngel View Post
    If he is one of those people then I think there would be signs of abuse/neglect on the dog... If the dog is healthy and taken care of, then it's strange for the owner to suddenly change his mind and insist that the dog be killed.
    I know a woman who took in her two family dogs to the humane society because she was sick and tired of taking care of them. They were her kids' pets and they weren't keeping up their end of the bargain to care and feed/clean up after them.

    These were two perfectly healthy dogs. One of the in-laws heard of this and went to the humane society to reclaim these dogs. Unfortunately, because the one was around 8, they immediately put it down because they didnt think anyone would adopt such a dog considering they had so many younger ones available.

    So, yes, a dog can look well-taken care of, but some people just don't want to be bothered after a while, even though they may have had good intentions in the beginning when acquiring the pet. No excuse, though.

  2. #62
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    Quote Originally Posted by DAngel View Post
    I don't think 80% chance of failure is a surgery that would likely be successful...
    Again, we only have the woman's statement to this fact. The vet may or may not have said that. I don't assume the woman is a liar, but I also don't assume she's not or that even if she is truthful she may not have misunderstood. I do know she didn't read the documents they gave her.
    Last edited by Garden Kitty; 02-24-2012 at 03:50 PM.
    "The Devil is joining in, and that's never a good sign." Phil Liggett

  3. #63
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    Quote Originally Posted by DAngel View Post
    I don't know his mental state and I don't know what he did or did not do before going to the vet. However, I do have a hard time believing that the man would only accept that the vet euthanize the dog. If it doesn't trouble him further and doesn't cost him more, why would he insist the dog be put down?
    I agree. If the guy was nothig but a sadistic monster whose only objective was the dog being killed, that could have been accomplished much more cheaply and less humane...rat poison, arsenic, starvation, or he could have taken a page out of Michael Vick's book by drowing, electrocuting, or hanging the dog. Not only that, the heartless arsehole could have sat there and happily watched while the dog suffered and breathed its last breath.

    I too find it difficult to believe that the guy would only accept the vet euthanize the dog.

  4. #64
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cupid View Post
    I know a woman who took in her two family dogs to the humane society because she was sick and tired of taking care of them. They were her kids' pets and they weren't keeping up their end of the bargain to care and feed/clean up after them.

    These were two perfectly healthy dogs. One of the in-laws heard of this and went to the humane society to reclaim these dogs. Unfortunately, because the one was around 8, they immediately put it down because they didnt think anyone would adopt such a dog considering they had so many younger ones available.

    So, yes, a dog can look well-taken care of, but some people just don't want to be bothered after a while, even though they may have had good intentions in the beginning when acquiring the pet. No excuse, though.
    I think older dogs have a small chance if they're a particular breed. Try being an older cat. Shelters have sooo many cats and kittens, that a senior cat would probably have no chance.

    We have our Mickey now because my old roommate's friend was moving to a new apartment that didn't allow pets. He was going drop Mickey off at the shelter, but Mickey's a big older adult (vet estimated 8 years old), and there are frankly TONS of cats that look like him, that we figured he'd have no chance at the shelter. So we took him instead. He's a big sweetie, and very spoiled now, haha. His previous owner came to see him last night actually - he's glad that someone he knows took him in.

    And I don't think he was callous in considering dropping the cat off at the shelter, just clueless. He likely didn't realize the dire conditions at shelters, thinking that someone would adopt Mickey cause he's a nice cat.

  5. #65

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    Quote Originally Posted by Garden Kitty View Post
    Perhaps the reason is because the Mom didn't bother to read the documents she signed, or because she was unwilling to pay for the surgery even though the doctor told her the surgery would likely be successful. The situation may be exactly as the Mom described, but we don't really know if we only hear one side of the story.
    The situation was not likely to be successful and if the documents Mom signed gave the power to have the surgery performed nonetheless and the dog given to a new home it it was successful, he was still negligent. A person preparing to put a pet to sleep is not in a good condition to read fine print.

    It he wanted to do the surgery for research purposes, she still stood have been informed and her consent obtained - given that the surgery could have caused a lot of suffering in addition to having a doubtful outcome. And if the surgery was consented to and then succeeded, the dog should have gone back to the original owners.

    It's a different case if someone brings in a healthy dog to be euthanized. Depending on the place, I would think the protocol would be to pass the animal on to a shelter or advise the person to surrender the dog to the shelter.

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