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Thread: Local idioms

  1. #201
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    Quote Originally Posted by Louis View Post
    I remember taking a Dutch colleague to Boston and having him ask me what language the people in the train station were speaking. He refused to believe it was English. We were in business meetings, and he literally could not understand what people were saying.
    I had that happen to me in Northern Ireland once. We were having dinner at a little place in Larne. I knew that the people at the next table were speaking English, but I couldn't understand more than a word here or there.

    Also, in Scotland & Ireland, I was asked more than once if I was from Australia - and I'm from Seattle - home to those who have possibly the nearest to "dictionary" pronounciation in the US.

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    Quote Originally Posted by skatingfan5 View Post
    Yes, even the Wikipedia entry on bologna allows that:

    ETA: Apparently you can lay the blame for the "needs + past participle construction" on the language of the early Scots-Irish settlers of the region around Pittsburgh. At least you can if the wiki on "Pittsburgh English" is accurate.
    Thanks for those! The second one especially. ALl of the pronunciation is spot on, I could hear my husband and his family. Can't tease them for the unusual pronunciation or grammar, they get ! I can tease my husband though. My favorite is when he asks me to make him some aegs. Eggs, but pronounced with a long A instead of a short e. He gets ribbed for that from all of us!

    Quote Originally Posted by Mozart View Post
    On Cape Breton Island, Nova Scotia where I now live cottages, etc are called bungaloos.
    Dinner is lunch
    Bungaloos or bungalos. We have small cottages here that are refered to as bungalos. Usually bungalos are the little cottages that are part of older resorts in the Poconos or the Catskills. but we have them around here too. This area used to be a vacation area - fresh air - for NYC dwellers, back in the '40s.

  3. #203

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    Quote Originally Posted by cruisin View Post
    Thanks for those! The second one especially. ALl of the pronunciation is spot on, I could hear my husband and his family. Can't tease them for the unusual pronunciation or grammar, they get ! I can tease my husband though. My favorite is when he asks me to make him some aegs. Eggs, but pronounced with a long A instead of a short e. He gets ribbed for that from all of us!
    I say "aigs" (or "aygs") when I'm talking about what hens lay -- however, when it is the verb "egg", I pronounce it with the short e.
    Bungaloos or bungalos. We have small cottages here that are refered to as bungalos. Usually bungalos are the little cottages that are part of older resorts in the Poconos or the Catskills. but we have them around here too. This area used to be a vacation area - fresh air - for NYC dwellers, back in the '40s.
    I've always seen it as "bungalow" although I think that might be a derivation from "bungalo." Here in the midwest it's most often used to refer to a small one-story (or 1-1/2 story) house in a residential area -- not necessarily as part of a resort of any kind. I guess what is considered a bungalow varies a bit, depending on the geographic region.

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    Quote Originally Posted by znachki View Post
    Also, in Scotland & Ireland, I was asked more than once if I was from Australia - and I'm from Seattle - home to those who have possibly the nearest to "dictionary" pronounciation in the US.
    Really? I've never heard that before. I'm not even sure what dictionary pronunciation is .
    "The secret to creativity is knowing how to hide your sources."-- Albert Einstein.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Prancer View Post
    Really? I've never heard that before. I'm not even sure what dictionary pronunciation is .
    Perhaps by "dictionary pronunciation" in the U.S. znachki means what is called "General American" or "Standard American English" accent? That is, a pronunciation that is distinguished from more regional accents (i.e. Southern, New England, etc.)? Think "generic network news broadcaster" accent.
    Last edited by skatingfan5; 02-08-2012 at 11:18 PM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by cruisin View Post
    Bungaloos or bungalos. We have small cottages here that are refered to as bungalos. Usually bungalos are the little cottages that are part of older resorts in the Poconos or the Catskills. but we have them around here too.
    My cousin in Manchester has a family cottage in Wales that they call "the bung."

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    Born and raised in South Eastern Michigan and never heard of "bubbler". We drink from the water or drinking fountain. We also drink "pop", wear "tennis shoes", and play in the "basement". Also, it seems that everyone I have ever known goes "up north" to their "cabin" many times during the year. "Up north" is really anywhere more northern than where you (Michigander) live. Last summer I held a garage sale. A family came and told me they were up north for just a few weeks at their cabin. I live thirty miles north of Detroit, yet this was up north to this family who lived on the Ohio/Michigan border. Their "cabin" was a two story house a mile or so away from my house. Never considered my suburban neighborhood up north! "Cabins" can be any architectural style and can be huge or tiny.
    Last edited by Lucy25; 02-08-2012 at 11:21 PM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by skatingfan5 View Post
    Perhaps by "dictionary pronunciation" in the U.S. znachki means what is called "General American" or "Standard American English" accent? That is, a pronunciation that is distinguished from more regional accents (i.e. Southern, New England, etc.)? Think "generic network news broadcaster" accent.
    Yes, but:

    The General American accent is most closely related to a generalized Midwestern accent and is spoken particularly by many newscasters

    Last time I checked, Seattle was not in the Midwest.

    Of all the American accents, the Midwestern accent is the easiest on the ear, which is why newscasters and actors use it.

    But pronunciation is a little different from accent.
    "The secret to creativity is knowing how to hide your sources."-- Albert Einstein.

  9. #209
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    Quote Originally Posted by Artemis@BC View Post
    My cousin in Manchester has a family cottage in Wales that they call "the bung."
    Isn't that a slang word for anus? Yikes!

    Funny, my husband and I were on vacation several years ago. We met this other couple who guessed my husband's from western PA, right off the bat. Then they asked me what part of the mid-west I was from. I said mid-north-western NJ. They didn't believe me. Even when I showed them my DL, they siad I might live here now, but I didn't grow up there. I actually had my birth certificate with me, so I proved it. The guy was flabbergasted, apparently he considers himself an accent expert. I guess not.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Prancer View Post
    Yes, but:

    The General American accent is most closely related to a generalized Midwestern accent and is spoken particularly by many newscasters

    Last time I checked, Seattle was not in the Midwest.
    No, it isn't but from the same wiki entry:
    Regional home of General American

    It is commonly believed that General American English evolved as a result of an aggregation of rural and suburban Midwestern dialects, though the English of the Upper Midwest can deviate quite dramatically from what would be considered a "regular" American Accent. ...The fact that a Midwestern dialect became the basis of what is General American English is often attributed to the mass migration of Midwestern farmers to California and the Pacific Northwest from where it spread.
    Seattle is in the Pacific Northwest, at least it was the last time I was there.

    And it seems that I grew up in "the area of the United States where the local accent is most similar to General American" (the Illinois part of the Quad Cities). People used to tell me that I should be a radio broadcaster because of my voice, but whenever I hear a recording of it, I think I don't sound "General American" enough -- a bit too flat, or something.
    Of all the American accents, the Midwestern accent is the easiest on the ear, which is why newscasters and actors use it. But pronunciation is a little different from accent.
    I suppose it is, but given the context of znachki's post, I thought that accent was most likely what was being observed.

  11. #211
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    Quote Originally Posted by emason View Post
    Our cellar had a poured floor, not a dirt one. We referred to it as the cellar; we never used the word basement. Don't know why, but it was the cellar, not the basement.

    ETA: Maybe it has to do with the age of the homes. My hometown, founded in 1654, had mostly older homes - all with cellars. Newer homes, circa 1950s post WWII, had basements, finished or otherwise.
    I think of basements as places where you can actually do things - like with an extra bedroom and/or bathroom or a t.v. or pool table or something like that. And a cellar as somplace you store things, where you only go to the cellar to put things away or bring them back up to the main part of the house. ??

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    Quote Originally Posted by milanessa View Post
    The pronunciation may be but not the sandwich. It's printed on every jar of Marshmallow Fluff. We called it (in WNY) a fluffer nutter.
    Try it on toast -- it doesn't stick to the roof of your mouth and teeth as much!!!!!

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    Quote Originally Posted by skatingfan5 View Post
    No, it isn't but from the same wiki entry:Seattle is in the Pacific Northwest, at least it was the last time I was there.
    Indeed, but why would Seattle dwellers have the best version of a Midwestern accent?

    Quote Originally Posted by skatingfan5 View Post
    And it seems that I grew up in "the area of the United States where the local accent is most similar to General American" (the Illinois part of the Quad Cities). People used to tell me that I should be a radio broadcaster because of my voice, but whenever I hear a recording of it, I think I don't sound "General American" enough -- a bit too flat, or something.
    Most Midwesterners hear themselves and are at how flat and nasal they sound, but that's actually what makes the accent the easiest on the ears.
    "The secret to creativity is knowing how to hide your sources."-- Albert Einstein.

  14. #214
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    Quote Originally Posted by znachki View Post
    Sticks - there is another one. Out in the middle of nowhere.

    In the NW it's usually the "boonies", or we used to say the "toolies", although we had a discussion in my office about that once, and I'm not sure anyone else had ever used it.

    This of course led to my trying to figure it out. Apparently it comes from The word Tules which is bulrush from the Lake Tulare area in California. So, lost in the weeds or out in the middle of nowhere.
    ”New West Overshoe” ‘round heah.

    Quote Originally Posted by Lucy25 View Post
    Born and raised in South Eastern Michigan and never heard of "bubbler". We drink from the water or drinking fountain. We also drink "pop", wear "tennis shoes", and play in the "basement". Also, it seems that everyone I have ever known goes "up north" to their "cabin" many times during the year. "Up north" is really anywhere more northern than where you (Michigander) live. Last summer I held a garage sale. A family came and told me they were up north for just a few weeks at their cabin. I live thirty miles north of Detroit, yet this was up north to this family who lived on the Ohio/Michigan border. Their "cabin" was a two story house a mile or so away from my house. Never considered my suburban neighborhood up north! "Cabins" can be any architectural style and can be huge or tiny.
    that’d be “up Nawth” in my neck of the woods.

    A mannerism that’s hard to explain. Usually you’ll hear it from older residents in response to a question, a quick intake of breath whilst saying “yeah."

    Quote Originally Posted by Susan1 View Post
    I think of basements as places where you can actually do things - like with an extra bedroom and/or bathroom or a t.v. or pool table or something like that. And a cellar as somplace you store things, where you only go to the cellar to put things away or bring them back up to the main part of the house. ??
    Anybody have a root cellar? In NE that was a section of the basement that had a dirt floor and was used to store...wait for it...root veggies, and the rows of mason jars contained preserved foods that had been “put up” for the winter.
    "Nothing in all the world is more dangerous than sincere ignorance and conscientious stupidity”– MLK

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    Quote Originally Posted by FigureSpins View Post
    In NYC, "come with?" means "do you want to come with me (somewhere)?"
    Not just NYC! I've heard that on t.v. shows for the last few years. And I will say to the t.v. ".....me".

  16. #216
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    Quote Originally Posted by Reuven View Post
    ”New West Overshoe” ‘round heah.

    that’d be “up Nawth” in my neck of the woods.

    Anybody have a root cellar? In NE that was a section of the basement that had a dirt floor and was used to store...wait for it...root veggies, and the rows of mason jars contained preserved foods that had been “put up” for the winter.
    That's where my dad stores his homemade wine. He calls it the bodega; my mom calls it the root cellar.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Aceon6 View Post
    Don't know if it's a localism or not, but we use Outer Mongolia.
    I'm sorry - I'm commenting separately as I'm reading along - and repeating some of the previous comments - so it someone's mentioned this one already............is that like B.F.E.: Bum F*** Egypt ????? :-0

    Side story, my cousin's roommate in college's high school age sister was talking to her mom about someplace "out in the boonies" and she started to say BFE (not the initials), realized who she was talking to, and what she couldn't say, so as she opened her mouth, East Jebip (don't ask me how to spell it - that's how it sounds) came out. So we always call someplace far away East Jebip.

  18. #218
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    Quote Originally Posted by Prancer View Post
    Indeed, but why would Seattle dwellers have the best version of a Midwestern accent?



    Most Midwesterners hear themselves and are at how flat and nasal they sound, but that's actually what makes the accent the easiest on the ears.
    Many, many years ago, I was on the phone with someone in New York and he said I had a midwestern accent (excuse me, a New Yorker saying *I* had an accent?). Anyway, I said Ohio's the only state that doesn't have ANY accent! ha ha ha

  19. #219
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    Quote Originally Posted by skatingfan5 View Post
    Perhaps by "dictionary pronunciation" in the U.S. znachki means what is called "General American" or "Standard American English" accent? That is, a pronunciation that is distinguished from more regional accents (i.e. Southern, New England, etc.)? Think "generic network news broadcaster" accent.
    Yep - no regional accent of any kind. If you pressed the little "pronounciation" button in an online dictionary - that's what we sound like.

  20. #220
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    I haven't been to the Pacific Northwest, but I've spent a lot of time all over California, and that's where I find American English the most "generic." Makes sense given the fact that with few exceptions, everyone is from somewhere else, so a common accent and pronunciation evolves.

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