Page 1 of 14 12311 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 266

Thread: Local idioms

  1. #1
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Location
    MA
    Posts
    3,378
    vCash
    500
    Rep Power
    0

    Local idioms

    I was traveling earlier this week for work out of state and asked someone where I could find a bubbler. I got several strange looks the more people I asked. I never knew "bubbler" was a local New England expression (apparently). When I finally described what I was looking for, the woman said, "Oh - you mean a water fountain!" (For the record, a water fountain to me are those things you throw coins in to make a wish).

    And I saw an episode of "Say Yes to the Dress - Atlanta" and learned that in the South if someone says something is "lovely", it's their polite way of saying they don't like it. I didn't know that

    What are some local idioms that you like or have encountered? Of course being from Boston, one of my favorites has to be "WICKED!" (another word for awesome). I knew "wicked" was a local thing to Boston. But I had no idea about "bubbler".

  2. #2
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Posts
    23,860
    vCash
    500
    Rep Power
    0
    People say bubbler in the Midwest too. Actually, I hear bubbler more in the Midwest than in the NE, so maybe it depends.

    Wicked I think is more of a British expression, but Boston has adopted a few British customs over the years.

    Binky for pacifiers I think is regionally specific. So also is mamaw and papaw for grandparents. In the NE, you hear roundabouts instead of traffic circles.

  3. #3
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Midwest
    Posts
    4,750
    vCash
    500
    Rep Power
    0
    I've lived in the Midwest since I was two and never heard "bubbler". What are you defining as Midwest???

  4. #4
    Not 'Boxxy'!
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Posts
    9,747
    vCash
    500
    Rep Power
    0
    In Rhode Island, an ice cream soda (with coffee syrup) is often referred to as a "cabinet."

  5. #5
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Posts
    23,860
    vCash
    500
    Rep Power
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by PDilemma View Post
    I've lived in the Midwest since I was two and never heard "bubbler". What are you defining as Midwest???
    I've heard it regularly in IL, WI, and MN.
    The Milwaukee Public Library traces the origin of the term "bubbler" back to the original 1888 Kohler trademark of that name.

    To those readers outside of our great state: many Wisconsinites use the term "bubbler" in place of "drinking fountain".
    http://www.law.wisc.edu/blogs/wisbla...e_bubbler.html

    Maybe it's just an upper Midwest thing

  6. #6
    Saint Smugpawski
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Cutting Down Privet Because Food Prices Are Going Up Next Year
    Posts
    11,732
    vCash
    500
    Rep Power
    34807
    Quote Originally Posted by soxxy View Post
    In Rhode Island, an ice cream soda (with coffee syrup) is often referred to as a "cabinet."
    Autocrat coffee syrup, specifically?
    The fastest thing out of New Jersey since Tricky Nicky in a Muscovian handbasket

  7. #7
    Not 'Boxxy'!
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Posts
    9,747
    vCash
    500
    Rep Power
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by Southpaw View Post
    Autocrat coffee syrup, specifically?
    I don't recall any other brand. I haven't seen the stuff in years.

  8. #8
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Diagonally parked in a parallel universe.
    Posts
    4,800
    vCash
    500
    Rep Power
    0
    Wicked is definitely not local to Boston. I've heard it used in various parts of North America for decades, and as someone else said it's common in the UK too.

    No point in getting started with British idoms -- we'd be here for ever.

    When the topic of local vernacular comes up, though, I'm reminded of where I grew up. It was a small town, and one of the dominant ethnicities was Portuguese. So a lot of Portuguese words became local idioms, even among the non-Portuguese population. Most of them were rude, though, so I won't repeat them here.

  9. #9
    Registered User
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    An American Circumstance
    Posts
    4,652
    vCash
    500
    Rep Power
    0
    Never heard of a bubbler before. Sounds like something I'd hear at a gay club.

    Philadelphians like to say "do you know what I mean" at the end of every sentence. It's morphed into the word "jhadanawwhutimean?"

  10. #10
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Posts
    17,241
    vCash
    500
    Rep Power
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by agalisgv View Post
    People say bubbler in the Midwest too. Actually, I hear bubbler more in the Midwest than in the NE, so maybe it depends.

    Wicked I think is more of a British expression, but Boston has adopted a few British customs over the years.

    Binky for pacifiers I think is regionally specific. So also is mamaw and papaw for grandparents. In the NE, you hear roundabouts instead of traffic circles.
    NJ - we call them water coolers or water fountains. Traffic circles are traffic circles or shortened to circles. I never heard the term roundabout until we rented a car in France. The navigation was British English and it said roundabout. And, of course we have jug handles. People from other areas don't like them, but I think they are much safer than making a left turn across a wide highway.

    A NJ'ism is "down the shore". Instead of saying going to the shore. Actually shore is an ism, other places they say going to the beach. We say that too, but if we're already down the shore and going from the hotel to the beach .

    We say soda, not pop. We refer to NYC as "the City". Every other city gets a name. Subs are subs, not grinders or hoagies. Sloppy Joes are ground meat with a ketchup sauce on a hamburger bun, they are also triple decker sandwiches with meat, cheese, cole slaw and russian dressing, on 3 slices of rye bread.

  11. #11
    From the Bloc
    Join Date
    Apr 2001
    Location
    California, I wish
    Posts
    17,355
    vCash
    500
    Rep Power
    11617
    The one that always gives away a New Yorker is that they say "on line" instead of "in line," as in, "I was waiting on line to buy a movie ticket." Never heard anyone else use that phrase that way.

  12. #12
    Bountifully Enmeshed
    Join Date
    Apr 2001
    Location
    At the Christmas Bizarre
    Posts
    38,161
    vCash
    250
    Rep Power
    46687
    Quote Originally Posted by agalisgv View Post
    Maybe it's just an upper Midwest thing
    I've never heard anyone say "bubbler," including friends in MN (I have quite a few from there) and Illinois (not as many, but still). The only person I know in Wisconsin in Veronika and I don't know what she says. Maybe she'll show up and tell us.

    But if you said "bubbler" here, no one would have a clue what you meant. FSU is only place I have seen that term for what I call a drinking fountain or water fountain. When I say I have never heard anyone say "bubbler," I mean that I literally have never heard that term used--no students, no transplants, no locals when I have traveled.

    I've always kind of looked forward to hearing it, because it sounds rather cheerful, but no.
    "The secret to creativity is knowing how to hide your sources."-- Albert Einstein.

  13. #13

    Join Date
    May 2002
    Age
    51
    Posts
    7,518
    vCash
    500
    Rep Power
    59408
    In the south, people ask you to "mash" the elevator button, instead of press.
    Made me laugh the first time I heard it.

  14. #14
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Posts
    23,860
    vCash
    500
    Rep Power
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by Prancer View Post
    I've always kind of looked forward to hearing it, because it sounds rather cheerful, but no.
    When I lived in the Midwest, particularly in IL and WI, I heard it regularly and picked it up from there. So if we ever meet, you'll finally hear someone say bubbler .

  15. #15
    Port de bras!!!
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Location
    Ravenclaw
    Posts
    30,123
    vCash
    500
    Rep Power
    34026
    I've never heard about the "bubbler" before. Plenty of "wicked" in Boston area though. Also, they say "roundabout" in NJ too.
    "Nature is a damp, inconvenient sort of place where birds and animals wander about uncooked."

    from Speedy Death

  16. #16

    Join Date
    May 2002
    Posts
    10,726
    vCash
    500
    Rep Power
    34438
    Quote Originally Posted by agalisgv View Post
    I've heard it regularly in IL, WI, and MN. http://www.law.wisc.edu/blogs/wisbla...e_bubbler.html

    Maybe it's just an upper Midwest thing
    Maybe. I've lived in Illinois for several decades (including northern Illinois during my high school years) and have never heard the term "bubbler" used. "Drinking fountain" seems to be the most common usage here in central Illinois (which differentiates it from the coin-tossing type of water fountain).

    I've heard of traffic circles being called "rotaries" -- not sure exactly where, though, but not here.

  17. #17
    AYS's snark-sponge
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    in the Bobrova & Soloviev Fan Clubhouse
    Posts
    41,906
    vCash
    500
    Rep Power
    30529
    Quote Originally Posted by Prancer View Post
    I've never heard anyone say "bubbler," including friends in MN (I have quite a few from there) and Illinois (not as many, but still). The only person I know in Wisconsin in Veronika and I don't know what she says. Maybe she'll show up and tell us.

    But if you said "bubbler" here, no one would have a clue what you meant. FSU is only place I have seen that term for what I call a drinking fountain or water fountain. When I say I have never heard anyone say "bubbler," I mean that I literally have never heard that term used--no students, no transplants, no locals when I have traveled.

    I've always kind of looked forward to hearing it, because it sounds rather cheerful, but no.
    I haven't heard anyone say bubbler in more than 40 years. My mother, my aunt and my grandmother used it because they were from Boston. I learned to say drinking fountain so as to not have people look at me like I was speaking gibberish.
    Congratulations 2014 World Ice Dance Champions Anna Cappellini & Luca Lanotte!!!

  18. #18
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Posts
    23,860
    vCash
    500
    Rep Power
    0
    Leave it to wiki to explain the origins and usage of bubbler :
    The Bubbler' was developed in 1889 by the then-small Kohler Water Works (now Kohler Company) in Kohler, Wisconsin, which was already well-known for its faucet production. While Harlan Huckleby is credited with the actual design, it was Kohler who patented it and trademarked the name. The original Bubbler shot water one inch straight into the air, creating a bubbling texture, and the excess water ran back down over the sides of the nozzle. It was several years later before the Bubbler adopted the arc projection, which may have allowed the drinker to partake more easily, or was perceived to be more sanitary.
    Current usage of term

    "Bubbler" is still used as a generic term in several regional dialects of the United States, originating in eastern Wisconsin and remaining well-known throughout the state. The term is widely used in NSW Australia. Oregon is also known to be quite familiar with the term, specifically in the Portland region where in the late 1800s Simon Benson installed 20 fountains, which are now known in the Portland area as "Benson Bubblers". It is also commonly used in New England, especially in the state of Rhode Island and in the cities of Worcester, MA and Lowell, MA. Despite its widespread usage in the aforementioned areas, the term "water fountain" is much more commonly used than "bubbler" throughout the remainder of North America.

  19. #19
    Just me
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Location
    no place special
    Posts
    6,762
    vCash
    9350
    Rep Power
    1820
    Quote Originally Posted by cruisin View Post
    And, of course we have jug handles. People from other areas don't like them, but I think they are much safer than making a left turn across a wide highway.
    I think this is what I grew up calling a "Michigan left."
    If this is to end in fire
    Then we will all burn together

  20. #20
    Beach Bum
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    Maryland burbs and shore
    Posts
    13,102
    vCash
    583
    Rep Power
    9930
    I have never heard bubbler before.
    I think I will have a snack and take a nap before I eat and go to sleep.

Page 1 of 14 12311 ... LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •