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  1. #1
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    Pairs Skating question.

    Ok...I was wondering if anyone here could answer this question. As I read somewhere that Pairs Skating (along with other Disciplines) is indeed done on Ships that as we know DO have Skating Shows...That much I do know. But does anyone happen to know how it is even possible to do Pairs on a Ship? As I would think that even really well trained Pairs Skaters with a lot of pratice would find it hard to do a Throw-Twist,etc. without being knocked off course by the movement of a Ship. Can anyone answer this. Thanks.

  2. #2
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    I have never been on a cruise ship, but I believe the rinks are very small. They probably don't attempt those elements like throws, twists and jumps. A lot of skaters don't when the rinks are small, regardless of whether they're on a ship or on land. They probably stick to things like lifts and adagio moves (meaning headbangers or death spiral that come off the ice).

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    Quote Originally Posted by Cherub721 View Post
    I have never been on a cruise ship, but I believe the rinks are very small. They probably don't attempt those elements like throws, twists and jumps. A lot of skaters don't when the rinks are small, regardless of whether they're on a ship or on land. They probably stick to things like lifts and adagio moves (meaning headbangers or death spiral that come off the ice).
    That sounds like it would make sense Cherub. Do we know if it's just SHOWS Skaters do aboard Ship? Or is it possible to do a whole Competition? I ask that because I would think the rules of Competition (the moves you need to do to get higher marks or first place) would have to be accommidated for a moving object to make it fair.

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    It's just show skating, not competitions.

    And the bigger cruise ships with ice rinks have stabilizers in the hull, so the ship is not rocking back and forth as much as you would expect.
    You should never write words with numbers. Unless you're seven. Or your name is Prince. - "Weird Al" Yankovic, "Word Crimes"

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    Oh,so they turn the staberlizers on down in the Hull to keep a Ship steady when doing Skating Shows so all that can't happen,right?

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    Yes, they do throws and jumps, it is small but they can still do great programs. One RC ship even allowed for open skating in you signed up.

  7. #7

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    The stabilizers are usually turned on most of the time, not just during the skating shows. Especially when the ship is in open water, away from the shore. The crew don't want people getting seasick from the ship rocking too much, and there are lots of other things going on in the ship (e.g. preparing hot food in the kitchen) where it's better for everything to be as stable as possible.

    One of the skaters in my club has been in a skating show on a cruise ship, and she says that even when the ship does rock during a show, the ice shifts from side to side so slowly that you can easily adjust to it. But she did say that jumps feel extra high and exciting if the side of the ice you are landing on is slanting downward as you land

    She also says that if the sea is really churning or stormy, the skating show will be postponed or rescheduled if the crew thinks the movement of the ice surface might be unsafe for the skaters.
    You should never write words with numbers. Unless you're seven. Or your name is Prince. - "Weird Al" Yankovic, "Word Crimes"

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by overedge View Post
    The stabilizers are usually turned on most of the time, not just during the skating shows. Especially when the ship is in open water, away from the shore. The crew don't want people getting seasick from the ship rocking too much, and there are lots of other things going on in the ship (e.g. preparing hot food in the kitchen) where it's better for everything to be as stable as possible.

    One of the skaters in my club has been in a skating show on a cruise ship, and she says that even when the ship does rock during a show, the ice shifts from side to side so slowly that you can easily adjust to it. But she did say that jumps feel extra high and exciting if the side of the ice you are landing on is slanting downward as you land

    She also says that if the sea is really churning or stormy, the skating show will be postponed or rescheduled if the crew thinks the movement of the ice surface might be unsafe for the skaters.

    Gee,she must really be a Great Skater to be able to skate on a Ship!!!! Is it ok to give her name? You mean the ice DOES move? They should be able to stablize the ice. You also make a good point. As I can see what might happen if Skaters were seasick while doing their programs.

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    I can't give her name, but she was a national-level skater when she competed.

    The ice does move, but it isn't a lot of movement - it just tilts slightly from side to side as the rest of the ship rolls with the waves. The only way to make the ice completely level all the time would be to have some sort of mechanism under the ice surface (sort of like adjustable table legs) that would move to keep the ice level as the ship moved. And that would be really expensive and might take up a lot of space, so it isn't really practical for a ship.
    You should never write words with numbers. Unless you're seven. Or your name is Prince. - "Weird Al" Yankovic, "Word Crimes"

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by overedge View Post
    I can't give her name, but she was a national-level skater when she competed.

    The ice does move, but it isn't a lot of movement - it just tilts slightly from side to side as the rest of the ship rolls with the waves. The only way to make the ice completely level all the time would be to have some sort of mechanism under the ice surface (sort of like adjustable table legs) that would move to keep the ice level as the ship moved. And that would be really expensive and might take up a lot of space, so it isn't really practical for a ship.
    It would be worth it though. Gee,how are Skaters even able to keep up with,and keep steady skating and balance with moving ice (keeping in line with the movement of it).

  11. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by FSWer View Post
    It would be worth it though. Gee,how are Skaters even able to keep up with,and keep steady skating and balance with moving ice (keeping in line with the movement of it).
    Because if the ice is moving at all, it moves very slowly. Cruise ships are very big and heavy ships, so even in rough seas they do not roll back and forth very fast. And,like most ships, when they roll back and forth it happens at an even pace. So, according to my friend, even if you are on the ice and feel it moving, you know that one side is going to move up at the same pace that the other side is moving downwards, so you can adjust for that when you skate.

    Also, on most ships, things like ice rinks are not near the outer sides of the ship (because the ice rink doesn't need a view of the water!). They are located more toward the centre of the ship, where the rocking motion is a lot smaller. It's like being near the centre of a see-saw or a teeter-totter - everything is moving at the same rate, but there is a much smaller movement in the middle than there is at the ends. So even if the ship is rolling, the surface of the ice rink is probably not going to move as much as the parts of the ship that are closer to the outside.
    You should never write words with numbers. Unless you're seven. Or your name is Prince. - "Weird Al" Yankovic, "Word Crimes"

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