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  1. #141
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rex View Post
    Well, I'm glad your mom missed that boat too. Wow. Talk about fate.
    Crazy. She was also involved in a near airplane crash when flying Aeroflot. But that's another story.

    As to the freighter's captain, yup sounds like drunk-navigating to me. From your Nakhimov link:

    Just minutes into the voyage, the ship's pilot noticed that the large bulk carrier Pyotr Vasev was on a collision course with the Admiral Nakhimov. The Pyotr Vasev was a Japanese-built, 18,604-ton freighter recently acquired by the Soviet Union, and was carrying a cargo of oats and barley from Canada. The pilot radioed a warning to the Pyotr Vasev, and the freighter responded, "Don't worry. We will pass clear of each other. We will take care of everything."
    Despite the message, Captain Viktor Tkachenko of the Pyotr Vasev did nothing to slow his ship or change course.
    "Nature is a damp, inconvenient sort of place where birds and animals wander about uncooked."

    from Speedy Death

  2. #142

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    I know from working on ships, we had to do boat drills at least twice a week (okay one was just for the crew and the other involved the passengers straight after we departed). One of the problems was the fact that many of the staff do not speak english. For the entire time I worked for RCCL they were constantly trying to work on this. The coast guard would come on and check the staff (asking random questions about what does this siren mean, what would you do in this situation, etc.) and if a ship failed there was the threat of not letting it go ahead with it's cruise. Never happened to us but I have some hysterical stories about muster.
    I guess the hard thing for a lot of people to accept is why God would allow me to go running through their yards, yelling and spinning around.


  3. #143
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    Quote Originally Posted by Civic View Post
    Just out of curiosity, has your coolness in a crisis ever been put to a real test?
    Yes. Thankfully, nothing as bad as 9/11, just things like evacuating the floor of staff and clients when the building next door collapsed, directing attendees when a steam pipe exploded outside of the conference center building, and insisting that we leave the classroom when there was an electrical fire in another room, but the professor assumed it was a false alarm. The latest one was getting 125 kids off the ice and into locker rooms during a tornado warning, then keeping them occupied for 30 minutes.

    Glad I stopped working in office buildings, though - I'm so glad to give up the floor fire warden responsibility.

  4. #144

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    Quote Originally Posted by IceAlisa View Post
    Crazy. She was also involved in a near airplane crash when flying Aeroflot. But that's another story.

    As to the freighter's captain, yup sounds like drunk-navigating to me. From your Nakhimov link:
    Wow. That is some scary shit. And the fact that the ship sank so quickly.

  5. #145
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    Let's be fair: If you go by percentages, the worst person to be on the Titanic was a man in second class. You had an 8% chance of survival. (I'm sort of trusting this site's math despite their being wrong on one count--first class children, while still far and away the best, wasn't 100% as little Loraine Allison died with her parents, body never recovered. Her brother and his nurse, who btw counts towards first-class passenger totals despite being a servant, escaped in an early boat.) Third class men fared slightly better--16% survival, compared to 46% of Third Class women (there was absolutely no attempt to keep Third Class passengers below decks. The only way to inform them was to have stewards literally go door to door in the largest passenger section of a very large ship, often to people who didn't speak English. They hadn't invented intercoms yet. Proactive steerage passengers like Hanna Youssef (Touma) responded by going to the boat decks--she and her children were in the last boat successfully launched. Presumably, the three other Third Class passengers who told her "The ship is sinking, we are going to go pray for help" didn't make it out. Her response was "I'll pray, but I'm going to try and save myself and my children, too.") 46% of the women in Third Class survived. That's compared to 32% of First-Class men. And most of that 32% were in the earlier port-side boats, and it includes people like Ismay (who really had a responsibility to survive if possible-at least to give the world a scapegoat), men who were drafted to row, or Colonel Gracie, who survived by climbing onto an overturned lifeboat after being swept off at the end.

    Meanwhile, 77% of the crew died. Of the 23 female crew, 20 survived. Of the male crew, 86% went down, including half the officers (Smith, Wilde, Moody, and Murdoch), all the Harland & Wolff guarantee group (Thomas Andrews and seven other engineers along for the maiden trip), the orchestra, the a la carte staff (more probable victims of lack of translators as most were Italians who didn't speak very good English), one of the two Marconi operators, one of the two masters at arms, more than half the stewards and victualling crew, and all but a little under a dozen of the Engine crew.

    No gates were deliberately locked, there is absolutely no credible evidence anyone was shot (Lowe fired his pistol down the side to stop passengers on the promenade decks from trying to swarm a boat being lowered), there is REALLY no evidence anyone committed suicide or bribed anyone else to get into a boat.

    Basically, if you wanted to live, be calm, obey IMMEDIATELY when you are told to put on your life vest and get on deck...and it really really helped to be a woman. If you were a man, hope they needed someone to row or you were up on deck early.

  6. #146

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    It would seem the captain may have had a mistress with him on board the ship. A mysterious Moldovan woman has given interviews stating that the captain helped save many lives and did not abandon the ship. The captain for his part has said she was with him on the bridge of the ship at the time of the accident. She seems to have been neither an employee nor a passenger and was not assigned a cabin.
    http://abcnews.go.com/News/costa-con...ry?id=15393421
    “Love all, trust a few, do wrong to none.” William Shakespeare

  7. #147
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    The captain has been suspended by the cruise line which has said that it will not be helping with his legal costs, according to what I heard on the late news this evening.
    Can't skate but love to watch

  8. #148
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    There's an article up on CNN that says the captain ordered dinner after he crashed the ship into the rocks.

    I saw another headline that referred to him as "The Chicken of the Sea"

  9. #149
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    Quote Originally Posted by Buzz View Post
    It would seem the captain may have had a mistress with him on board the ship. A mysterious Moldovan woman has given interviews stating that the captain helped save many lives and did not abandon the ship. The captain for his part has said she was with him on the bridge of the ship at the time of the accident. She seems to have been neither an employee nor a passenger and was not assigned a cabin.
    http://abcnews.go.com/News/costa-con...ry?id=15393421
    Every time I think this guy cannot dig himself into a bigger hole he opens his mouth and proves me wrong
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    A: Competition forums on the board are available to those with a Season Pass or a premium membership How to View Kiss & Cry

  10. #150
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    Doesn't this guy have a lawyer to tell him to STFU?
    "Nature is a damp, inconvenient sort of place where birds and animals wander about uncooked."

    from Speedy Death

  11. #151
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    Quote Originally Posted by Buzz View Post
    It would seem the captain may have had a mistress with him on board the ship...She seems to have been neither an employee nor a passenger and was not assigned a cabin.
    http://abcnews.go.com/News/costa-con...ry?id=15393421
    Quote Originally Posted by Fridge_Break View Post
    There's an article up on CNN that says the captain ordered dinner after he crashed the ship into the rocks.
    Something I read awhile ago said the captain was seen eating with a woman in a cafe onshore while the rescue efforts were underway. Don't know if that is the woman above, or if that story has been validated.

  12. #152

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    Quote Originally Posted by 4rkidz View Post
    Rex those old ships remind me of the one we took from England to Canada - it was called the Stefan Batory

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/TSS_Stefan_Batory

    it was my first time on a ship - I was a teenager and we hit a major transatlantic storm south of greenland and approaching newfoundland and the teacher at our dinner table reminded us all we were only a few hundred miles from where the titanic went down They then closed the decks due to the swell of the water as the waves were coming over the decks and all the furniture and plates/dinner all slid off the tables .. Took me another decade before I went back on a ship - (although am excited for my 4th cruise next month) ..
    The Batory was around forever, and one of the first liners around to have tourist class as the dominant accommodation. What a wonderful experience that must have been...did you emigrate on it, or were you on a pleasure trip?

  13. #153
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    Quote Originally Posted by danceronice View Post
    Let's be fair: If you go by percentages, the worst person to be on the Titanic was a man in second class. You had an 8% chance of survival. (I'm sort of trusting this site's math despite their being wrong on one count--first class children, while still far and away the best, wasn't 100% as little Loraine Allison died with her parents, body never recovered. Her brother and his nurse, who btw counts towards first-class passenger totals despite being a servant, escaped in an early boat.) Third class men fared slightly better--16% survival, compared to 46% of Third Class women (there was absolutely no attempt to keep Third Class passengers below decks...
    I'm currently reading "Titanic" Women and Children First" by Judith Geller. It contains some fascinating information about Loraine Allison's nurse, Alice Cleaver. Unbeknownst to the Allisons, she was a convicted child murderer. Bess Allison hired her after the children's regular nurse quit while the family was traveling in Europe. When she felt the ship hit the iceberg, Nurse Cleaver grapped Baby Trevor, wrapped him a blanket and rushed up to the boat launching deck without telling his parents. They spent precious time looking for him and missed all of the lifeboats.

    Third Class passengers on the Titanic were disadvantaged by their berthing area's distance from the lifeboat launching desks. They had to make their way up from the ship's lower levels; often climbing ladders in the process while the lower level corridors were flooding. Some of the worst cases involved large family groups traveling in Third Class. Everyone in the Goodwin, Sage and Rice families died. Language wasn't a barrier in their cases since the first two families were English and the latter family Irish.

  14. #154
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    Quote Originally Posted by numbers123 View Post
    And most of us look for the elevators and exit signs to help us. If the ship is taking on water, I bet the elevators weren't working or if they were, were so full that only the people on the top levels got on them. I remember the process of debarking and it takes several hours to get everyone off the ships.


    Our last cruise, we had terrible weather on the next to last day. The decks were closed, the pools were emptied, they were dispensed Dramamine to anyone, including staff, who needed it. I think there were some restrictions on what was served at the various venues due to cooking issues. But we are talking about a 14 day cruise in 2013 and possibly one this year.
    that reminds me I must pack my gravel (dramamine) I hope you do another cruise.. five years ago we did a two week Princess one in South America and the panama canal - had a balcony and was amazing.. It is still a very safe way to travel - and I think under different leadership/crew the Costa ship could have had a different outcome
    Thanks to PI .. I discovered I'm actually a Nontheist

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  15. #155
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    That Alice Cleaver story is disputed - I would google it before taking it as the gospel truth.

  16. #156

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    This may have been posted, not sure how old it is:

    Carnival is offering survivors of the crash a 30% discount on their next cruise. Can you believe this!? They are giving them their money back, as well, but to then offer them a slight discount on another cruise? I can't even begin to put into words how awful of a PR move this is. It is probably 30% off of full price, they would probably get a better deal just booking last minute when prices go way down. I am not even sure a free cruise or a lifetime of free cruises would get many of those people back on one of their ships.
    -Brian
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  17. #157
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    That is the only laughable thing to come out of this tragedy. Bad PR is right.
    3539 and counting.

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  18. #158
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    Everything I have read is that the 30% is a discount for those who were booked on the concordia, but have now had their.cruise canceled. Not that it is compensation to those on board.

    Eta: anyone booked.through mid march apparently, but also those who were on the ship when it sank. They are also accepting cancelations on all.their ships, with no penalty. Not as awful as it first sounded.
    Last edited by Skittl1321; 01-23-2012 at 08:58 PM.

  19. #159
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    A couple of years ago, mr cygnus and I had a cruise booked for New Zealand/Australia with Celebrity Cruise lines. A week or so before we were to go, we got a message that the cruise was cancelled because the ship was in dry dock undergoing repairs. We not only got a full refund for the cruise and airfare, but we got a free cruise to be taken any time in the next year. It was disappointing to miss the Australian trip (it was too late in the season to rebook)- but we lost no money and took the (grown up) kids on a free cruise of the Mediterranean two months later. Not bad.
    I know. But I do not approve. And I am not resigned.
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  20. #160

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    Quote Originally Posted by danceronice View Post
    first class children, while still far and away the best, wasn't 100% as little Loraine Allison died with her parents, body never recovered. Her brother and his nurse, who btw counts towards first-class passenger totals despite being a servant, escaped in an early boat
    Lorraine Allison was the only first class child to die, an absolutely impossible situation for her mother. I have no idea what I would have done in her situation. IMHO the most heartbreaking story by far in any maritime disaster.

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