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  1. #1

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    A question to the Americans

    if you were reading a program documentation spelled in an american english (aka program, center etc) would you expect grey to be spelled as gray or as grey or it wouldn't matter?
    (reading our product user guide, it spells grey and center in the same document. Am clueless whether it's good, bad, unimportant).

    Thanks!

  2. #2

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    It doesn't matter as long as you are consistent.

  3. #3
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    Grey = GB
    Gray = US
    "I missed the view and viewed the mist..." ©

  4. #4

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    Quote Originally Posted by cholla View Post
    Grey = GB
    Gray = US
    No, both are commonly used in the US.

  5. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by cholla View Post
    Grey = GB
    Gray = US
    Yes, that's what I meant. The technical writer spelled `color' and `center' and then `grey'.

    emason, thank you! That explains

    Grey it is!

  6. #6
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    I can never remember which is the "American" spelling of the word, but the copy-editor at work tells me that Gray is the american spelling. Looking at all the major style guides ing the office, they all say gray is American and grey British.

    You can remember it because A = American, E = English

    Both are commonly used here, so I don't think anyone would give it a second glance, but I think that is because most Americans don't know which is the "British" spelling (because it doesn't follow any style convention that normally Americanizes words- why have two different words at all?)

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    I use both. Seriously. I can never remember which to use. Somedays it's a, others it's e.
    AceOn6, the golf loving skating fan

  8. #8

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    What Aceon6 said ^^^^^^^
    Never mess with a geocacher. We know the best places to hide a body....

  9. #9

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    Gray, graigh, grae, greigh. I prefer grey.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by emason View Post
    No, both are commonly used in the US.
    "Gray" is far more commonly used in the U.S.

    Quote Originally Posted by Skittl1321 View Post
    I can never remember which is the "American" spelling of the word, but the copy-editor at work tells me that Gray is the american spelling. Looking at all the major style guides ing the office, they all say gray is American and grey British.

    You can remember it because A = American, E = English

    Both are commonly used here, so I don't think anyone would give it a second glance, but I think that is because most Americans don't know which is the "British" spelling (because it doesn't follow any style convention that normally Americanizes words- why have two different words at all?)
    I was taught in second grade that "grey" is the British spelling and shouldn't be used in written U.S. English.

    It I were reading an article that used the spellings "center," "color," and "grey," I would wonder why the writer was switching between American and British spelling conventions.

  11. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by Vagabond View Post
    "Gray" is far more commonly used in the U.S.



    I was taught in second grade that "grey" is the British spelling and shouldn't be used in written U.S. English.

    It I were reading an article that used the spellings "center," "color," and "grey," I would wonder why the writer was switching between American and British spelling conventions.

    I don't agree; grey and gray were used interchangeably when I was growing up and there was no differentiation. There were just alternate spellings of the same word.

  12. #12

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    I had a teacher named "Grey". And I have always interchanged grey and gray. When I had this teacher, I assumed that Grey was the spelling when it's a name, and gray when it's a color. But when reading, grey and gray are used to mean color. So I just figured nobody gives a crap and grey and gray can co-exist peacefully.
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  13. #13

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    My American dictionary at hand lists grey as a variant of gray. I.e., grey is not incorrect, but gray is preferred. It doesn't say anything about grey being primarily a British spelling.

    Same with theater vs. theatre.

    So I'd agree with emason -- either is correct as long as it's consistent.

  14. #14

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    I really don't read any difference. for example grey-dolloped horse seems to be the write spelling. Gray is a color in a crayola box. I had a friend who named her daughter Gray. So perhaps I read them: grey as a descriptive term and gray as a noun?
    I agree with PrincessLeppard and emason, just be consistent.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by gkelly View Post
    Same with theater vs. theatre.
    I was taught that in American English a theater is a building and theatre is the art form.

    I don't know if that is a "real" rule though.

    (Oh- and I prefer grey, but the editors have conditioned me to use gray.)

  16. #16
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    Grey looks much nicer.

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by emason View Post
    No, both are commonly used in the US.
    They are. But gray is defined as "the US spelling of grey" by the Oxford and Cambridge dictionaries when grey is a "variant of gray" for the Merriam-Webster. Gray is a color, grey is a colour . In the US the two spellings are acceptable. In the UK, they are not. Use "gray" in a Bristish document and it will be considered mispelling. I know that because I once did... Hence my reply to Tanya.
    "I missed the view and viewed the mist..." ©

  18. #18
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    cholla is correct about Britain. Here in the UK, 'grey' is used universally, whereas if I came across the word 'gray' without knowing the source I would assume it was written by an American writer (or else it was a spelling mistake).
    Last edited by orientalplane; 01-09-2012 at 03:57 PM.
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  19. #19

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    I prefer gray.

  20. #20

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    I always think of grey as having yellowish undertones and gray as having bluish undertones.

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