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  1. #1
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    The Pledge....should it be said at Sporting Events?

    Ok...there has been a lot of talk about this on the News and Radio. So I thought I'd take a servey about it here. Do you think the Pledge of Alengence (sorry,I can't spell it without looking at it) should be said or recited at Sporting Events along with our National Anthem?

  2. #2
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    No. I think it is definitely appropriate at government meetings and such, but not at a sporting event. The anthem(s) are enough, IMO.

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    I don't know of any sporting events where The Pledge of Allegiance is spoken...I don't think it's necessary. The Anthems, especially at an international sporting event, are fine.

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    ITA with the rest. A national anthem is appropriate but the Pledge of Allegiance is not. Not everyone in attendance has to pledge allegiance to the USA- they could be from different countries- but it is easy to show respect to a national anthem of any country, without any allegiance. When a Canadian sporting team visits (e.g. for an NBA or NHL game) we all show respect to their national anthem, along with ours.

    At other international sporting events (Olympics/world championships in various events) also it seems appropriate to recognize the teams from different countries through their national anthems.

    I have not seen any sporting event where the pledge is recited.

    As a side note, in many Toastmasters clubs in the USA (I belong to a couple of those clubs) the pledge of allegiance is recited at the start of the meeting. I have seen even some non-US citizens say it along with the rest of the members, although they are not required to. However, I think the pledge should be said only if a person actually has allegiance to the USA (I don't know if other countries have something similar; India does not).

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    As far as National anthems go, get this kid to perform it: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w-WCsJrSfWQ

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    No, no, and no.
    Nubka - Unpaid Slave Laborer...

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    I don't know,I do know if they did,I wouldn't have a problem with it.If someone is from another country and doesn't want to pledge to the USA,they don't have to.As long as they do the National Anthem,I'm cool.Hopefully sung properly.

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    I haven't figured out the neccesity for national anthems yet. I mean, really, what does a national anthem or a pledge of allegiance have to do with sports? Other than political or jingoist reasons?

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    Not all athletes on American professional sports teams are Americans. Non-Americans should not be forced to pledge allegiance to the US at a sports game. In other circumstances, yes, like if they were becoming US citizens or some other legal/formal occasion, but this IMHO is not one of those circumstances.

    I think it's OK to have the national anthem(s) of whatever countries the teams represent, and people who are not citizens of the country whose anthem is being performed can stand respectfully and quietly during the performance.
    Who wants to watch rich people eat pizza? They must have loved that in Bangladesh. - Randy Newman on the 2014 Oscars broadcast

  10. #10

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    I think our National Anthem is long enough and just drags, no need to also recite the Pledge.
    -Brian
    "Michelle would never be caught with sausage grease staining her Vera Wang." - rfisher

  11. #11

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    I'm with feetwerk. I don't even understand why the National Anthem is sung/played at sporting events. It even gets played prior to our rink's dinky Basic Skills competitions. Does anyone know how this tradition got started?

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    According to this blog it was started at a baseball game. No idea if it is accurate, but it sounds good.

    After America’s entrance into World War I, Major League Baseball games often featured patriotic rituals, such as players marching in formation during pregame military drills and bands playing patriotic songs. During the seventh-inning stretch of game one of the 1918 World Series, the band erupted into “The Star-Spangled Banner.” The Cubs and Red Sox players faced the centerfield flag pole and stood at attention. The crowd, already on their feet, began to sing along and applauded at the end of the song.

    Given the positive reaction, the band played the song during the next two games, and when the Series moved to Boston, the Red Sox owner brought in a band and had the song played before the start of each remaining contest. After the war (and after the song was made the national anthem by a congressional resolution in 1931), the song continued to be played, but only on special occasions like opening day, national holidays and World Series games.

    During World War II, baseball games again became venues for large-scale displays of patriotism, and technological advances in public address systems allowed songs to be played without a band. “The Star-Spangled Banner” was played before games throughout the course of the war, and by the time the war was over, the pregame singing of the national anthem had become cemented as a baseball ritual, after which it spread to other sports.

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    No. I stopped saying the pledge in high school (I stood but wouldn't say it) after I learned that "under God" was inserted as an anti-communism stance in the 1950s. Never got in trouble for it.

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    Interesting article about pro athletes refusing to participate in what they considered excessive displays of patriotism:

    http://nbcsports.msnbc.com/id/5481503/
    Who wants to watch rich people eat pizza? They must have loved that in Bangladesh. - Randy Newman on the 2014 Oscars broadcast

  15. #15

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    I've never heard the pledge at any sporting event, and it should remain that way.

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    Quote Originally Posted by vesperholly View Post
    No. I stopped saying the pledge in high school (I stood but wouldn't say it) after I learned that "under God" was inserted as an anti-communism stance in the 1950s. Never got in trouble for it.
    As did I. Also seeing what was happening in the Southern states in the 60s told me there was not “justice for all.” If I have pledge allegiance to something, I would prefer the U. S. Constitution.
    And no, the pledge does not belong at sporting events.
    "Nothing in all the world is more dangerous than sincere ignorance and conscientious stupidity”– MLK

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    Hmm, A War on The Pledge, I'm e-mailing Faux News.
    Only Faux can combat this unpatriotic dis.

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    Not so fast there, Swifty. They’ve still got the War on Christmas to wage first.
    "Nothing in all the world is more dangerous than sincere ignorance and conscientious stupidity”– MLK

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