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  1. #121
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    Garr, I am so sorry. When I saw that it was a pack hunting dog I kind of wondered if he would be a good fit. I wish I had said something.

    (((Garr))) (((beagle - who would probably be happiest in a hunting pack)))

  2. #122
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    I'm sorry Gar, but I was astonished that they told you a beagle found with a hunting pack would adjust. I mentioned it at the beginning. They are hunting dogs. Their natural instinct is to chase prey. Some beagles don't have that instinct (and they don't make good hunters and do make good house pets), but yours was part of a pack. My family has had lots of beagles that were rabbit dogs. They were good dogs, but I would never have tried to make a house pet out of any of them. That's not what they were intended for.

    I guess the shelter was trying to avoid having to put this dog down which is what is probably going to happen since he's been returned twice. (((((Freddie)))) He's just being was he was born to be.
    Adelina Sotnikova defeated the curse of Esta She is indeed the Greatest Of All Time!

  3. #123

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    So sorry to hear this. And poor Freddie, losing another home, and not understanding why. Hopefully your poor cat will recover, too.

  4. #124
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    Quote Originally Posted by GarrAarghHrumph View Post
    We're absolutely crushed. For fear for the life of our cat, we have to return the beagle. We're also taking the cat to the vet for dehydration. Believe me, we're crushed.
    I'm so sorry. Hopefully, Freddie will find a more appropriate (for him) place to live, but it's not worth the cat's life. (((Garr))) It's hard to make tough decisions, but it will be for the best, imo.

  5. #125

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    Aw, Garr, that is one horrible story, I had missed the part about pack hunting dog. So sorry for you, your husband and kid(s?). I can't imagine your pain.

  6. #126
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    Aw Garr, I'm so sorry the adoption did not work out. But don't feel badly about your actions, you did all the correct steps. I too had a bad adoption experience and really these situation lay solely on the blame of the shelters. It's their jobs to get the dogs into homes, and sometimes they paint too bright a picture in order to get them into homes. When I got my shelter dog I walked in and told them that I was single, fenced yard and house, and planned on having kids sometime in the next 5 years (ie, within the lifespan of the dog) and had kids next door that I allow to climb the fence to get their footballs and such that sometime fly over into my yard. What dog did they give me? Well, she was very pleasant, but I quickly got strong suspicions of abuse. And....she was food aggressive. Very food aggressive, as in would bite. Tell me the shelter wasn't aware of that! Granted, I could have made do with her at that point in my life, but the minute I had a baby running around dropping teething biscuits and cheerios on the floor and reaching to pick it back up....well I couldn't have a food aggressive dog go on the attack. Which is what she would do- even went after me if I dropped food accidentally while cooking, once it hit the floor it was "hers". So after a week of tears and multiple shelter calls, I returned her.(It was immediately or a few years down the road when I had a baby, which would have been unfair to the dog).I told them specifically that she needed a home that would never have young children. Fingers crossed that they listened. I was literally bawling at the return, and the shelter folks actually came back out with a puppy to offer me, which I turned down.

    I since did research and bought a Brittany spaniel puppy from a breeder, and from 9weeks old I worked on him with training. (and any person can easily take food out of his mouth without a single issue, and he does wonderfully with children). I would consider adopting in the future, now that I have some dog owning experience, but would do so only from a rescue organization that is not in an extreme rush to move them out of the door (as they are fostered) and due to the fostering knows the dogs behaviors intimately. True, there are good dogs in shelters, but sadly many dogs get dumped there for a reason and need experienced owners with specific family situations to rehab them for family suitability, and also the shelters are sometimes too eager to get them out the door, versus finding the perfect forever home. It leads to disaster and puts people with good intentions (like me) off from going to shelters and adopting.

    Take some time and do some more research. Your forever friend is out there somewhere! Hugs, Woodstock

  7. #127
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    Even some of the non-humane society adoption groups are not necessarily telling the truth about their adoptable dogs.

    Humphrey has a host of health issues. He was saved from a kill shelter, and was quite sick when his rescuers got ahold of him. We were never told of these health issues, beyond that he had an upper respiratory infection. On our first trip to the vet, she took one look at him and said "Cushings dog". If this group had a vet look at him, and I doubt they did - probably did his vaccinations in house - then they hid the fact that he had this disease. Should he have been put to sleep? Probably. I'm glad he wasn't, because he is a nice dog, but he is a lot of trouble because of his disease. We found him at an adoption event at the local PetSmart.

    Shadow, on the other hand, was an entirely different story. I found her on Petfinder. She and her sister were kept isolated, in an outdoor pen, by their owner, for the first five months of their lives. One of the people at the rescue group talked him into giving them up for adoption. She is a german shepherd. German shepherds who are not socialized in the first five months of their lives are often either timid or aggressive. (See last paragraph) I knew nothing about this, the rescue said nothing - they said she was "learning to be house trained" which was a complete joke. That dog had never seen the inside of a house until we brought her home. She had never heard a door close or a toilet flush or a host of other things that make up our daily lives. Thankfully I found a smart dog trainer (at the same Pet Smart where we got Humphrey) who told me exactly what I needed to do to try to make her a good dog. She is still timid to this day - she accepts children way better than adults - but has issues with people she doesn't know in general, and even people she does know who aren't immediate family in our house. Not aggressive, thank God, but pacing and grumbling. I often wonder what happened with her sister. Last I saw her, she was being looked at by a family with two small children. I hope they quickly learned what I learned about the breed - I shudder to think of the consequences if they didn't.

    That still won't stop me from adopting from a rescue - one of the best dogs I ever had (Floppy) came from the Humane Society - but education is the key. I think the rescue groups could be more proactive in this area - both owner education and honesty about the breeds they are adopting out.

  8. #128

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    ((Gar)) I'm so sorry to hear that Freddie did not work out with your kitty. It breaks my heart when pets that both deserve and need great homes cannot live together. I really hope you find another dog who is better with kitty.

  9. #129

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    Gar, I'm sorry to hear about your experience. It didn't click that you would be introducing an older rescue dog to household with a cat.

    All dogs have predatory instincts, although some like beagles more than others.

    But in truth it is always difficult to introduce a new dog to house with an existing cat. A new cat can even be harder.

    The best scenario is to introduce a a puppy to an older cat. The cat will become dominant and the relationship boundaries will be established. We introduced puppy to cat/cats three times and it worked well, although on one occasion as the puppy grew up she began chasing the cat and the cat did not like that, and subsequently spent a lot of time in a favourite hiding place. . .

    Unless the dog you adopt has lived with cats, it will be a problem. As I said, you're best to start of with a puppy.

  10. #130
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    Quote Originally Posted by Japanfan View Post
    Gar, I'm sorry to hear about your experience. It didn't click that you would be introducing an older rescue dog to household with a cat.

    All dogs have predatory instincts, although some like beagles more than others.

    But in truth it is always difficult to introduce a new dog to house with an existing cat. A new cat can even be harder.

    The best scenario is to introduce a a puppy to an older cat. The cat will become dominant and the relationship boundaries will be established. We introduced puppy to cat/cats three times and it worked well, although on one occasion as the puppy grew up she began chasing the cat and the cat did not like that, and subsequently spent a lot of time in a favourite hiding place. . .

    Unless the dog you adopt has lived with cats, it will be a problem. As I said, you're best to start of with a puppy.
    Except both Garr and hubby work so a puppy would be impossible to take care of.

  11. #131
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    Quote Originally Posted by Anita18 View Post
    Except both Garr and hubby work so a puppy would be impossible to take care of.
    Maybe an older puppy. At 6-8 months old, it's still a puppy, but depending on where you get the dog, house breaking should have been started by then. And a 6 month old can be crated for longer lengths of time. Just be sure to have an appropriately sized crate, and leave water.

    Tip - don't try and leash train and house train at the same time. If you have a dog that is not used to being on leash, it will not have a clue that it's out on a leash to do it's business. What I did (very successfully) was get a 6' x 6' pen for outside (with no bottom). Cooper was 9 months old. I brought Cooper out and put him in the pen, without a leash. He was always in the same spot, so the smells were there. I waited for him to do his business, then brought him inside. Then I took him out and taught him to walk on leash. Eventually, he started doing business while on leash, and we didn't need the pen anymore. It took about 4-5 weeks. Fastest housebreaking ever!

  12. #132

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    Garr. I'm sorry that adopting Freddie didn't work out for your family. I hope that you do find a dog that will be a good fit for everyone, including your cat.

    Quote Originally Posted by Japanfan View Post
    But in truth it is always difficult to introduce a new dog to house with an existing cat. A new cat can even be harder.
    Perhaps, but I have introduced new cats into my household which already had a cat (or sometimes two) in residence. In one case, I took in my sisters two cats (aged 13 and 17) when she moved to England for four years. I had a pair of 14 year old cats at the time, and they all learned to get along much more quickly than I had imagined -- in less than a week all four were sometimes sitting on my legs/lap at the same time.

    The best scenario is to introduce a a puppy to an older cat. ....

    Unless the dog you adopt has lived with cats, it will be a problem. As I said, you're best to start of with a puppy.
    Quote Originally Posted by Anita18 View Post
    Except both Garr and hubby work so a puppy would be impossible to take care of.
    While it may be true that introducing a puppy is easiest/"best", I think it can depend on the individual dog and cat involved. My sister has almost always had both a dog and several cats at the same time. The most recent "introduction" was when she took in a two-year-old border collie mix who never was a problem with her three cats. They all tolerated each other, though they never became overly friendly, despite Jake, the dog, doing his best to try to win them over. Spot, the senior and "top cat," viewed Jake as an interloper and would give him a look that could only be described as indignant disdain and leave the room in "disgust" when ever Jake entered.

  13. #133
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    Quote Originally Posted by cruisin View Post
    Also, when mixed breeding is about shedding, are they really considering the potential adverse genetic problems. I know they started breeding Cavaliers with Poodles, to get the sweet personality of the Cav, without the shedding.
    Breeders of these "hybrid dogs" are a bunch of amateur geneticists. There is no scientifically sound reason to assume that breeding Breed A with Breed B will give you only the good traits of A with only the good traits of B. Doesn't always work out that way. Witness the "Chorkie", which has the housebreaking problems and grooming needs of the Yorkie and the dental and orthopedic problems of the Chihuahua. Half the time these crosses involve breeds with the same bad traits anyway.

    Yet, pretentious people are shelling out $3,000 for some of these so-called "designer dogs", which are basically glorified mutts that they could have rescued at a shelter for $100.

    There's one born every minute.

  14. #134
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    Quote Originally Posted by skatingfan5 View Post
    While it may be true that introducing a puppy is easiest/"best", I think it can depend on the individual dog and cat involved. My sister has almost always had both a dog and several cats at the same time. The most recent "introduction" was when she took in a two-year-old border collie mix who never was a problem with her three cats. They all tolerated each other, though they never became overly friendly, despite Jake, the dog, doing his best to try to win them over. Spot, the senior and "top cat," viewed Jake as an interloper and would give him a look that could only be described as indignant disdain and leave the room in "disgust" when ever Jake entered.
    Aww, that reminds me of the pit bull puppy I saw at the shelter when I volunteered once. He was like "I WANT TO BE YOUR FRIEND!" to the cats, and the cats were like, "NO GO AWAY."

  15. #135
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    Quote Originally Posted by heckles View Post
    Breeders of these "hybrid dogs" are a bunch of amateur geneticists. There is no scientifically sound reason to assume that breeding Breed A with Breed B will give you only the good traits of A with only the good traits of B. Doesn't always work out that way. Witness the "Chorkie", which has the housebreaking problems and grooming needs of the Yorkie and the dental and orthopedic problems of the Chihuahua. Half the time these crosses involve breeds with the same bad traits anyway.

    Yet, pretentious people are shelling out $3,000 for some of these so-called "designer dogs", which are basically glorified mutts that they could have rescued at a shelter for $100.

    There's one born every minute.
    I agree, totally. The goal of the "Cava-poo" is to get a non-shedding dog with a calm/sweet personality. But, they might get a a hyper dog that sheds. There is no guarantee that you will get the desired "perfect" traits.

  16. #136

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    Quote Originally Posted by skatingfan5 View Post
    While it may be true that introducing a puppy is easiest/"best", I think it can depend on the individual dog and cat involved. My sister has almost always had both a dog and several cats at the same time. The most recent "introduction" was when she took in a two-year-old border collie mix who never was a problem with her three cats. They all tolerated each other, though they never became overly friendly, despite Jake, the dog, doing his best to try to win them over. Spot, the senior and "top cat," viewed Jake as an interloper and would give him a look that could only be described as indignant disdain and leave the room in "disgust" when ever Jake entered.
    Of course it can work out - but you don't want to bring dogs home from the shelter just to take the best. Really, it would be best to take a dog already familiar with cats, it would just make it easier.

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