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  1. #221
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    Quote Originally Posted by jeffisjeff View Post
    I am wondering how our Jane Austen fans feel about this:
    Deft, satirical, light-handed Jane Austen as done by stodgy, dour, heavy-handed P.D. James?

    "The secret to creativity is knowing how to hide your sources."-- Albert Einstein.

  2. #222

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    Quote Originally Posted by rfisher View Post
    I hope she didn't poke her eyes out with a stick.
    Mais non!
    It was not quite as good as the first two, but I liked it very much, particularly the ending - I never saw that coming. (Katniss murdering Coin)
    The epilogue was sappy, to be sure, but I'd already assumed they would end up together.
    I was v. pleased with myself for being suspicious of Coin from the first, and predicting Prim would die.
    I was a little disppointed that none of my (rather complicated) theories panned out. I thought that possibly Madge's mother had initiated the whole Mockingjay plan to avenge her sister's death, and I was sure there was something going on with that pearl.
    I loved Johanna and would have liked to find out more about her.
    I think Suzanne Collins is brilliant.

  3. #223

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    Quote Originally Posted by Prancer View Post
    Deft, satirical, light-handed Jane Austen as done by stodgy, dour, heavy-handed P.D. James?

    This book cracks me up:
    http://www.amazon.com/Pride-Promiscu...68577&sr=1-1#_

  4. #224

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    Quote Originally Posted by Prancer View Post
    I'm reading Bill Bryson's At Home, which is, as always with Bryson, chock full of fascinating trivia told in a comfortably rambling style. I think it might ramble a bit more than some of his other work and there are a few anecdotes that serve no purpose whatsoever that I can tell, but still, who knew that houses were so fascinating?
    I adore Bill Bryson. I went to a reading he did in NYC when this first came out, and it was a hoot. He's hysterically funny, with a deadpan sort of humor. He read excerpts from "Life and Times of the Thunderbolt Kid" and "In a Sunburnt Country". From "At Home" he read the part about wigs and hairstyles, everyone was in stitches.
    He speaks with a British accent, which I found kind of odd as he's American and went to live in the Uk as an adult.

  5. #225
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    I had to fly to Atlanta and back within the last 48 hours and started and finished Barbara Kyle's The King's Daughter, thinking it was going to be a good Tudor story. It was... ehhhhh. Kyle's writing is pretty rough and the story reads more like a bad movie script than a good novel. Good enough to while away a few hours of time in the airport, but I'm glad it was a library book.

    Moving onto Riding Lessons by Sara Gruen.

  6. #226

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    I'm halfway through "A Beautiful Blue Death" by Charles Finch and I'm loving it so far.

  7. #227

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    Quote Originally Posted by mkats View Post
    Oh, I just finished The Forgotten Garden too! Loved it but had the same feeling as you as far as jumping goes - I got disappointed every time Nell came back, I liked Eliza's parts best!
    I read this book earlier this year and I had the same reaction - the Eliza parts were really strong, but the rest were not and it made you just want to stay with Eliza. The Eliza parts reminded me a little bit of The Thirteenth Tale, which is probably why I liked them best.

    Just coming back from vacation, where I got a lot of reading done on planes and trains. Finished The Help - pretty average. Glad I read it to see what all the fuss was about, and a nice break to have a book that I could rip right through, but was looking forward to getting into something meatier after. Hotel on the Corner of Bitter and Sweet accomplished that - excellent book about a Chinese-American boy and Japanese-American girl during WWII in Seattle and the impact of the Japanese internment camps, which I hadn't known much about before that.

    I also read two excellent non-fictions - both auto-biographies, as it happens. The first was Stolen Innocence about Elissa Wall, who was part of the FLDS polygamist sect and testified against Warren Jeffs (he was convicted of two counts of being an accomplice to her rape, although the verdict has been overturned...he may or may not be re-tried). Fascinating story. From what I've seen of clips of her on TV, I'm guessing the collaborator had a heavy hand in the writing, but to some extent the story speaks for itself.

    The last one that I'm almost through is Kathryn Bertine's As Good As Gold, who was the former skater turned triathlete turned cyclist who worked for ESPN while trying to get to the 2008 Olympics (which didn't happen, but it appears she's still aiming for 2012). Much of the book draws heavily on her ESPN articles, but I enjoyed them the first time around and there are some new stories in the book. Kept me entertained for more than half of an 8 hour flight, so good enough for me.

    Next up is Major Pettigrew's Last Stand based on earlier recommendations from this thread.
    Last edited by Erin; 10-17-2011 at 01:52 AM.

  8. #228

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    Finished Rick Riordan's Son of Neptune...finally. I don't like Hazel and Frank as much as Tyson and Annabeth, but I do like them OK.

    I need to go back and re-read some parts from the first series; there were some references to it in this book that I just didn't remember. I'm really interested in where he goes with the series--he's got a vehicle now he can do a lot with. It's hard for me to believe this is this same author of the Kane Chronicles, as those books are just dreadful.
    "The practice of sport is a human right. Every individual must have the possibility of practicing sport, without discrimination of any kind and in the Olympic spirit, which requires mutual understanding with a spirit of friendship, solidarity and fair play." –Olympic Charter

  9. #229
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    Original Sin by Beth McMullen: funny. Sally Sin is a wife, mother and spy. This is the first of what will be a series.
    Those who never succeed themselves are always the first to tell you how.

  10. #230
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    "The Codex" a great "can't put it down" adventure novel by Douglas Preston.

  11. #231
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    Quote Originally Posted by rfisher View Post
    Original Sin by Beth McMullen: funny. Sally Sin is a wife, mother and spy. This is the first of what will be a series.
    Is it any good? I got that one as an e-book freebie, but I haven't gotten around to reading it yet.
    "The secret to creativity is knowing how to hide your sources."-- Albert Einstein.

  12. #232
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    Quote Originally Posted by Prancer View Post
    Is it any good? I got that one as an e-book freebie, but I haven't gotten around to reading it yet.
    It's funny. She's a spy who decides to quit and get married and have a kid. Well, you can guess how well that works. There are a lot of backstories in this book that explains her past leading up to the action that will set up future books.
    Those who never succeed themselves are always the first to tell you how.

  13. #233
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    I'm in love with "The Dovekeepers" by Alice Hoffman. Have always wanted to know more about Masada and she's one of my favorite authors, so it's a win-win for me. I find myself wanting to take a day off work just to read.

    I'm now dying to buy Alison Weir's book about Mary Boleyn. Anyone read it yet? It's called "The Mistress of Kings". Figure it has to be better than 'the other Boleyn' garbage (and that horrid movie)...

  14. #234
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    Quote Originally Posted by dbell1 View Post
    Figure it has to be better than 'the other Boleyn' garbage (and that horrid movie)...
    Did you ever see this version of the movie? It was before the Hollywood version, and it pulled me in enough to launch a Tudor obsession that would last several years and dozens of other books.

    Interesting that it stars Natascha McElhone - I love her subsequent work in the movie Laurel Canyon and in Californication - didn't realize it was her back then!

  15. #235
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    Hmm, never heard of that version. Might have to go hunt down a version. I've been Tudor obsessed since I was a preteen.

  16. #236
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    Well, I finally slogged my way through The Way of the Peaceful Warrior by Dan Millman, which was given to me by a friend. I know this book has a huge following, and my friend called it "mind-blowing," but the only word I can use to describe it is awful. I'm not a big fan of "spiritual journey self-help" books anyway, but this one was particularly bad. The "characters" (supposedly real people, tho he's a bit coy about that) were very unlikable, I didn't believe Dan's growth/transformation (he was only marginally less self-absorbed at the end than he was at the beginning), and the writing was really, really, really bad.

    It might have been slightly better if I'd read it when I was a teenager or in my early twenties, but the over-riding messages of "if you want to be happy, just be happy," and "don't focus on what others think of you," are just so friggin' obvious. Suffice it to say that I won't be running out to read any of the sequels -- or any other books this friend recommends!

  17. #237

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    I have no time to read for fun these days, but I just added a big stack of books to my to-read list and I was wondering what people in here had read them and what their thoughts were about them (though some haven't even come out yet...)

    The Little Bride, by
    1Q84 by Haruki Murakami
    The Marriage Plot by Jeffrey Eugenides
    The History of Love by Nicole Krauss
    Van Gogh: The Life by Stephen Naifeh
    The Little Bride by Anna Solomon

    I loved Jeffrey Eugenides first two books and can't wait to read this one.
    Adelina Sotnikova is the 2014 Olympic champion!

  18. #238
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    I just finished a Lynda LaPlante novel, The Red Dahlia. LaPlante is best known as the writer of the Prime Suspect television series that starred Helen Mirren. The Red Dahlia features another female detective, Anna Travis. It was good but I didn't find Anna Travis as nearly interesting as Jane Tennison.

  19. #239

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    Quote Originally Posted by oleada View Post
    The History of Love by Nicole Krauss
    I loved this book! Her more recent novel (Great House) was interesting but no History of Love.

  20. #240

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    Quote Originally Posted by dbell1 View Post
    ... I'm now dying to buy Alison Weir's book about Mary Boleyn. Anyone read it yet? It's called "The Mistress of Kings". Figure it has to be better than 'the other Boleyn' garbage (and that horrid movie)...
    "TOBG" isn't serious history; even Warnicke (the historian cited by Gregory as "supporting" the book) has disclaimed it. Any Tudor fans interested in reading the Mary Boleyn book may be interested in reading this review of it:

    http://www.theanneboleynfiles.com/15...r-book-review/

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